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This may not be the best forum for this question, but here goes. I have already posted to Mandrakeexpert.com and am still waiting for an answer.

Ok, I expect lots of flame for being a Windows user, blah, blah, whatever. My problem is that I tried using Linux, it did not mesh with my system, and now I can't get rid of it. I installed Mandrake 7.2 using the lnx4win program that installs Linux in a Windows folder as disk images. It comes with an 'uninstall program' that consists of a DOS batch file. This deletes all of the Linux files, but leaves the OS selector (called GRUB) in the system. Once Linux has been removed, the GRUB ceases to function and I cannot boot my system. The only solution so far has been for me to manually delete the Linux files, leaving the GRUB files and folders alone. I still have to manually select 'Windows' each time I turn on my computer this way though. Kind of annoying. Did the Linux install put something in my BIOS that makes it boot to the GRUB? I can't find any way to bypass this. Any help would be appreciated. Oh, I am using Windows ME if that helps diagnosis any.
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I still have to manually select 'Windows' each time I turn on my computer this way though. Kind of annoying. Did the Linux install put something in my BIOS that makes it boot to the GRUB? I can't find any way to bypass this. Any help would be appreciated. Oh, I am using Windows ME if that helps diagnosis any.

Linux changed your boot block on your HD so that Grub got loaded instead of the windows loader.

Run your windows setup disk, and tell it to repair the installation. It will rewrite the boot block so that the Windows loader starts.
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Thanks. That was a much quicker response than from Mandrake. Maybe someday I'll be able to run Linux. It looks good to me, but I can't get it to work with my video, printer, or NIC.
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Thanks. That was a much quicker response than from Mandrake. Maybe someday I'll be able to run Linux. It looks good to me, but I can't get it to work with my video, printer, or NIC.

Unless they are very strange, they should work. I do not know about Mandrake, but Red Hat support a lot of stuff:

http://hardware.redhat.com/redhatready/cgi-bin/us/db-hcl.cgi

Probably Mandrake have a similar web page.
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...Maybe someday I'll be able to run Linux. It looks good to me, but I can't get it to work with my video, printer, or NIC.

Just out of curiosity, what is your video, printer, and NIC?
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This question has already been answered, but anyhow...

An alternative solution is to run fdisk with the /mbr option to fix the boot record. The setup program probably does the same thing, but you can do this without a setup disk.
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Just out of curiosity, what is your video, printer, and NIC?

My video is built in, but is a SiS 530, which Linux supports. The problem is that there are verticle static lines running through my screen. I tried many different combinations for my resolution/display size/video card and could not get rid of the lines. My printer, Canon BJC 6000, which should also be supported through CUPS. The problem here is that I can't get it to print anything. My NIC is a CNet card, which Linux keeps incorrectly identifying as some other brand, but when I try to change it, it says there is no network card detected. Probably some problem with Plug-n-Play.
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An alternative solution is to run fdisk with the /mbr option to fix the boot record. The setup program probably does the same thing, but you can do this without a setup disk.

This, in fact, turned out to be the solution. After completely reinstalling Windows, I still had the problem. Actually, I'm not sure what the hell Windows was doing during that 45 minutes because all of my settings and passwords are still intact. The only thing that changed was the startup splash screen. Anyway, the 1.5 seconds I spent typing 'fdisk/mbr' proved more helpful than millions of lines of Microsoft code. Thanks to everyone who gave advice (as of right now, I still have not gotten a reply from Mandrake).

As far as my future with Linux goes, I would like to put together a lower-end, "cheap" box with fairly common components and install Linux on it to use as a server. The main reason I was trying out Linux was because the version I downloaded (even cablemodem seems slow when you download 1.2GB) had web and ftp server software with it. I'll probably hang around, lurking in this group to get a better understanding of Linux before I try something like this again.

Once again, thanks to all.
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I think you said in your original post that you first installed the lin4win option in Mandrake - running Linux from within your windows.

When I first started with Linux I tried something like this too. From taking with a number of other people, it seems that this setup almost always results in a bad experience.

It is probably more work to partition your hard drive and install Linux seperately, but IMO it is well worth it.

joe
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I think you said in your original post that you first installed the lin4win option in Mandrake - running Linux from within your windows.

When I first started with Linux I tried something like this too. From taking with a number of other people, it seems that this setup almost always results in a bad experience.

It is probably more work to partition your hard drive and install Linux seperately, but IMO it is well worth it.


When I was constantly bitching to my nephew about Windows 95, he said to get Red Hat Linux 5.0 (the current product at the time) because it was the easiest to install. While he said it would be possible to repartition my 1.6 GByte hard drive to run both operating systems (dual bood), it did not seem a good idea to me. So I just bought another (4.3Gbyte, the smallest I could get at the time) hard drive for $200 (this was in mid 1998) and installed it there with no problems.
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Author: tobarstep
Number: of 1164
Subject: Re: Help with uninstalling Linux
My video is built in, but is a SiS 530, which Linux supports. The problem is that there are verticle static lines running
through my screen. I tried many different combinations for my resolution/display size/video card and could not get rid
of the lines. My printer, Canon BJC 6000, which should also be supported through CUPS. The problem here is that I
can't get it to print anything. My NIC is a CNet card, which Linux keeps incorrectly identifying as some other brand,
but when I try to change it, it says there is no network card detected. Probably some problem with Plug-n-Play.


Curiously enough, I am at this moment stalling on my next job, which is debugging that %$#&^ NT box with the built in SiS 620 that has a corrupted video driver, won't boot, and won't repair (SCSI HD and for some reason the Windows repair doesn't find it...gotta dig deeper into the ol' bag of tricks...) I haven't tried Linux on that box so I have no opinion or help for you on that one. Ditto the printer; I actually haven't tried to configure one here yet.

However, I might be able to help with the NIC, having just gone through it. I have an ultra-cheap ISA NIC in this machine. It does not PnP, and pnpdump did not/does not find it. The solution was to make sure that the IRQ and the IO address is properly specified for it. It is an NE2000 compatible, and the ne driver did it. I had a bit of trouble because I kept expecting the system to find it. But, when I set the IRQ and the IO in /etc/modules.conf, and told it what driver to use we were off to the races.
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It is probably more work to partition your hard drive and install Linux seperately, but IMO it is well worth it.

At the Egghead.com auction site, I picked up a refurb IBM ultra SCSI 4.3 Gig HD for $31 including shipping. I stuck it onto my SCSI bus and installed Linux on it. The only tampering with the Windows drive consisted of writing Grub to the MBR.

Cheap enough at the price to play around. When I get the system to the point where I decide to put it into production and start the transition off NT, then I can if I choose copy the whole thing to a new HD.
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