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Author: bizgenie Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 3061  
Subject: HGSI's Patents Date: 3/7/2000 2:17 PM
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There appears to be many skeptics on today's HGSI board. I am one who recognized that HGSI would be a leader in genomic research back in 1995 when the stock was selling for about $18 bucks a share. I continue to hold the stock today and see no reason for jumping overboard, since I consider it a lifetime investment. It is true that Hazeltine is a promoter and you can certainly read between the lines in his interview with the Fools that he is jealous of the widespread publicity Celera is getting these days. However, his message to the Fools, though boastful, is "right on" and holds lots of merit. With his high ranking position, not only in a public company but within his industry, he cannot afford to lie or mislead current or prospective investors with false claims. If you should gain anything at all from his interview, it should be to question the degree of success that Celera will have in getting patents on genes either already discovered by HGSI or on applications that lack the indepth testing and and practices that HGSI submits every gene to upon discovery and prior to patent filing. In short, Hazeltine is no dummy and has reason to believe HGSI will have a greater patent issuance-to-filing ratio that its competitors.

I hold stock in both companies so don't take this post as a slam on CRA. It will have its own degree of success and will likely catch the better headlines during 2000. But 5 years down the road it will be HGSI that will be considered the Microsoft or Intel of the genomic industry.

Several posts have questioned the number of patents that HGSI has been awarded of the 7,500 apps that have been filed. One must remember that the approval process at the U.S. Patent office takes time and the office is overwhelmed by all the filings from HGSI, CRA, AFFX, and others. To date, HGSI has 117 patents issued. They are as follows:



Title


Issue Date
Patent Number
1. Human Osteoclast Derived Cathepsin March 26, 1996 5,501,969
2. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein 3 and 4 April 2, 1996 5,504,003
3. Superoxide Dismutase-4 April 9, 1996 5,506,133
4. Macrophage Inflammatory Protein Gamma September 17, 1996 5,556,767
5. Human Growth Hormone January 28, 1997 5,597,709
6. Human ABH April 8, 1997 5,618,717
7. Serum Paraoxonase May 13, 1997 5,629,193
8. Transforming Growth Factor Alpha HI May 27, 1997 5,633,147
9. Human Oxalyl-COA Decarboxylase June 3, 1997 5,635,616
10. Interleukin-6 Splice Variant June 6, 1997 5,641,657
11. Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzymes 7,8, and 9 July 22, 1997 5,650,313
12. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-3 July 22, 1997 5,650,295
13. Human Transcription Factor IIA July 29, 1997 5,652,117
14. GABAa Receptor Epsilon Subunit August 5, 1997 5,654,172
15. Cytostatin I August 19, 1997 5,658,758
16. Human MutT2 December 9, 1997 5,695,980
17. 5-Lipoxygenase-Activating Protein II December 9, 1997 5,696,076
18. Human Potassium Channel 1 and 2 Proteins January 20, 1998 5,710,019
19. Human Elastase-4 January 20, 1998 5,710,035
20. Human Inositol Monophosphatose H1 February 10, 1998 5,716,806
21. Human DNA Topoisomerase I Alpha March 3, 1998 5,723,311
22. Fibroblast Growth Factor-13 March 17, 1998 5,728,546
23. NERF Genes February 24, 1998 5,721,113
24. Colon Specific Genes and Proteins March 31, 1998 5,773,748
25. Human Vascular IBP-Like Growth Factor May 5, 1998 5,747,280
26. Human ABH Polypeptide May 5, 1998 5,747,312
27. Nucleic Acid Encoding Human Endothelin-Bombesin Receptor and Method of Producing the Receptor May 12, 1998 5,750,370
28. Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor May 26, 1998 5,756,309
29. Neurotransmitter transporter June 2, 1998 5,759,854
30. Fibroblast Growth Factor 11 June 9, 1998 5,763,214
31. Nucleic Acid Encoding Novel Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor June 9, 1998 5,763,218
32. Fibroblast Growth Factor 15 June 30, 1998 5,773,252
33. Human G-Protein Receptor HGBER32 July 7, 1998 5,776,729
34. Human CCN-Like Growth Factor July 14, 1998 5,780,263
35. Arginase II July 14, 1998 5,780,268
36. Human Prostatic Specific Reductase July 28, 1998 5,786,204
37. Human Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate Synthetase Polynucleotides and Method for Using Same July 28,1998 5,786,193
38. Paraoxonase Polypeptides and Use Thereof August 11, 1998 5,792,639
39. Human Amine Transporter August 25, 1998 5,798,223
40. Adrenergic Receptor October 6, 1998 5,817,477
41. Nucleic Acid and Cells for Recombinant Production of Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 October 6, 1998 5,817,485
42. Gene Encoding Human DNASE November 3, 1998 5,830,744
43. Corpuscles of Stannius Protein, Stanniocalcin November 17, 1998 5,837,498
44. Cytostatin I December 1, 1998 5,844,081
45. Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzymes 7, 8, and 9 December 15, 1998 5,849,286
46. Human Elastase-4 December 22, 1998 5,851,814
47. Human Amine Transporter January 12, 1999 5,859,200
48. Polynucleotides encoding Human DNA Ligase III and Methods of Using These Polynucleotides January 14, 1999 5,858,705
49. C5A Receptor January 19, 1999 5,861,272
50. Polynucleotide Encoding A Chemotactic Protein February 2, 1999 5,866,373
51. Colon Specific Gene and Protein January 19, 1999 5,861,494
52. DNA Encoding Retinoic Acid Receptor Epsilon February 9, 1999 5,869,284
53. Human G-Protein Receptor HCEGH45 February 9, 1999 5,869,623
54. Superoxide Dismutase-4 February 16, 1999 5,871,729
55. Human Neuronal Attachment Factor-1 (NAF-1) February 16, 1999 5,871,969
56. Human 4-1BB Receptor Splicing Variant February 23, 1999 5,874,240
57. Antibodies to Corpuscles of Stannius Protein, Stanniocalcin March 2, 1999 5,877,290
58. Human Chemotactic Protein March 9, 1999 5,880,263
59. Polynucleotides Encoding Chemokine Alpha-2 June 8, 1999 5,910,431
60. Method of Purifying Chemokines from Inclusion Bodies June 15, 1999 5,912,327
61. Human Deoxycytidine Kinase-2 June 22, 1999 5,914,258
62. Polynucleotides Encoding Extra Cellular/Epidmeral Growth Factor HCABA58X Polypeptides June 29, 1999 5,916,769
63. Human Cystatin F July 6, 1999 5,919,658
64. Polynucleotides Encoding Haemopoietic Maturation Factor July 13, 1999 5,922,572
65. Human Amine Receptor July 27, 1999 5,928,890
66. Human Geranylgeranyl Pyrophosphate Synthetase July 27, 1999 5,928,924
67. Human ABH July 27, 1999 5,929,225
68. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 2 (VEGF-2) August 3, 1999 5,932,540
69. Polynucleotides Encoding Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 2 (VEGF-2) August 10, 1999 5,935,820
70. Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor August 3, 1999 5,932,702
71. Polynucleotides Encoding Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor HIBEF51 August 24, 1999 5,942,414
72. CD44-Like Protein and Nucleic Acids August 24, 1999 5,942,417
73. Human Oxalyl-CoA Decarboxylase August 31, 1999 5,945,273
74. Connective Tissue Growth Factor-2 August 31, 1999 5,945,300
75. Human Hematopoietic Specific Protein August 31, 1999 5,945,303
76. Cytostatin III August 31, 1999 5,945,309
77. Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzymes 7, 8, and 9 August 31, 1999 5,945,321
78. Human G-Protein Coupled Receptor HPRAJ70 September 7, 1999 5,948,890
79. DNA Encoding the Chemotactic Cytokine III September 14,1999 5,952,197
80. Human Inositol Monophosphatose H1 September 21, 1999 5,955,339
81. Interleukin-6 Splice Variant September 28, 1999 5,958,400
82. Human G-Protein Receptor HCEGH45 September 28, 1999 5,958,729
83. DNA Encoding an Immune Cell Cytokine October 5, 1999 5,962,268
84. Human Growth Hormone Variants and Methods of Administering Same October 5, 1999 5,962,411
85. Human IRAK-2 October 12, 1999 5,965,421
86.. Dendritic Cell-Derived Growth Factor October 19, 1999 5,968,780
87. Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzymes 8 & 9 October 19, 1999 5,968,797
88. Human DNA Topoisomerase I alpha October 19, 1999 5,968,803
89. Cytostatin 1 November 2, 1999 5,977,309
90. Human Criptin Growth Factor November 9, 1999 5,981,215
91. Epidermal Differentiation Factor November 9, 1999 5,981,220
92. Polynucleotide Encoding Chemokine Beta-4 November 9, 1999 5,981,230
93. Polynucleotides Encoding Chemokine Beta-15 November 9, 1999 5,981,231
94. DNA Encoding Human Cystatin E November 16, 1999 5,985,601
95. Polynucleotides Encoding Natural Killer Cell Enhancing Factor C November 16, 1999 5,985,612
96. Polynucleotides Encoding Interleukin-19 November 16, 1999 5,985,614
97. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-3 November 16, 1999 5,986,060
98. Prostatic Growth Factor November 30, 1999 5,994,102
99. Human Stanniocalcin-Alpha November 30, 1999 5,994,103
100. Corpuscles of Stannius Protein, Stanniocalcin November 30, 1999 5,994,301
101. Human Vascular IBP-Like Growth Factor November 30, 1999 5,994,302
102. Adrenergic Receptor November 30, 1999 5,994,506
103. Polynucleotides Encoding Human G-protein Coupled Receptor GPRZ December 7, 1999 5,998,164
104. Polynucleotides Encoding Human Endokine Alpha December 7, 1999 5,998,171
105. Polynucleotides Encoding Myeloid Progenitor Inhibitory Factor-1 (MPIF-1) and Polypeptides Encoded Thereby December 14, 1999 6,001,606
106. Interferon Stimulating Protein and Uses Thereof December 14, 1999 6,001,806
107. Growth Factor HTTER36 December 21, 1999 6,004,780
108. Brain-Associated Inhibitor of Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator December 28, 1999 6,008,020
109. Human Cytokine Polypeptide December 28, 1999 6,008,022
110. Human Cystatin E January 4, 2000 6,011,012
111. Human B-cell translocation genes-2 and 3 January 11, 2000 6,013,469
112. Fibroblast Growth Factor 15 January 11, 2000 6,013,477
113. DNA Encoding Endothelial Monocyte Activating Polypeptide III January 11, 2000 6,013,483
114. Polynucleotides Encoding Human G-Protein Chemokine Receptor HDGNR10 February 15, 2000 6,025,154
115. Galectin 9 and 10SV Polynucleotides February 22, 2000 6,027,916
116. Chemokine Beta-6 Antagonists February 22, 2000 6,028,169
117. Polynucleotides Encoding G-Protein Parathyroid Hormone Receptor HLTDG74 Polypeptides February 29, 2000 6,030,804


This is my first post ever to a Fool.com board. I hope I haven't offended anyone with my views.

bizgenie
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