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Author: tallfoolvictor Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 2601  
Subject: Re: Television over IP Date: 4/11/2002 10:49 AM
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Hi ExpertNovice,

First, I would like to say that "expert" is a relative term. While I like to think that I know something about moving data through an optical network I don't consider myself an expert. You've asked:

->Assuming the network is already built and the satellite is already up: does either method have a significant cost advantage? How about transmission time, I consider anything over 3 seconds too long for “live” sports coverage. Would say a game in Boston transmit back to Arizona in under 3 seconds (best guess) over fiber? I assume that fiber would transmit better in bad weather, and be more secure than even a scrambled satellite signal, right? But do any operators care enough about those factors to pick fiber over Satellite?

I believe that the answer is that once the infrastructure is in place to provide a specific service it is very difficult to dislodge it. Once the satellite is in place it is not expensive to run however, if it should malfunction then it gets expensive. Satellites are ideal for broadcasting because the total bandwidth provided is limited. Everyone using the satellite is getting the same broadcast. The advantage to sending video over the internet is that it is possible to store massive video files and provide them on demand.

Regarding live television. If the delay on delivering live TV from anywhere was one minute would you notice? And if you are ten seconds behind everyone else in broadcasting do you really care? By the way, the speed of light (in a vacuum) is about 186,000miles per second. In fiber it is about 120,000 miles per second. So if there is a delay it probably is not due to the fiber. In other words, I'd expect no change in terms of lag between conventional broadcast and a broadcast over fiber.

Would a big ISP buy into a long haul network? It all depends on their expectations. I would bet that they would be more inclided to negotiate a long term contract for use of bandwidth on the network at a reduced rate but that's just a guess.

TallFoolVictor
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