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Author: Akthar Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 127714  
Subject: Home Inspection Date: 2/9/2000 12:29 PM
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I'm buying a new home and pretty excited. I needed some help deciding when I should have the Home Inspection done: after trades (before drywall), just before closing or a few months after I move in.

Is it worth doing at all since it is a new home?

Also, is there some place one can find out about what capacity heating/cooling units are recommended/required based on the home size to ensure adequate heating/cooling.

Thanks in advance.
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Author: 2gifts Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 8953 of 127714
Subject: Re: Home Inspection Date: 2/9/2000 12:34 PM
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I'm buying a new home and pretty excited. I needed some help deciding when I should have the Home Inspection done: after trades (before drywall), just before closing or a few months after I move in.

Is it worth doing at all since it is a new home?

Also, is there some place one can find out about what capacity heating/cooling units are recommended/required based on the home size to ensure adequate heating/cooling.



I would think having the inspection done just before closing makes the most sense. Having an inspection after you have bought the property and have no leverage with the seller seems like a waste of money to me. The building inspector is the one who is supposed to be doing inspections prior to drywall going up and making sure everything is to code. You might want to have a conversation with the local building inspector to see when he will be inspecting your property and if you could tag along, but I'm not sure there's much you can affect at that stage.

As far as the heating/cooling, the HVAC guy is supposed to do calculations showing what the house needs. Around here, that has to be given to the building inspector as part of the process. I'm not sure if that is true everywhere.

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Author: 1960TR3 Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 8957 of 127714
Subject: Re: Home Inspection Date: 2/9/2000 12:58 PM
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>>Is it worth doing at all since it is a new home?<<

Yes, it can be very much worth doing. Most reputable builders will do what's called a "walk through" with you just prior to closing. This is to determine any mistakes that might have been made or to fix anything not done properly. The problem is that the walk through consists only of you and your builder or his/her agent. Hopefully, if you have a Realtor, he/she should attend as well. Certainly you can find the paint that needs to be touched up, etc. as well as anyone. But...can you tell if the HVAC is adequate? Are all the outlets grounded properly & with the correct polarity? My point is that a "new" home frequently needs a more thorough inspection by someone who represents *you* as much and sometimes more than an "existing" home. My experience is that inspectors find a lot of things you will nver find. In fact, you may even live with them until a few years down the road when you become the seller, your buyer hires an inspector, and you get to fix the problems at your expense.

FWIW: I've *never* seen a builder tell my client there is anything mechanically wrong with their new home. Walk throughs are designed to fix paint, scratches, & other minor items and to make you feel good about the builder.

It could be the best money you spend and if the builder balks, you have a builder trying to hide something.

Last point: remember to get a licensed, reputable inspector. Ask for referrals to a good one. Get a written report.

Bob

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Author: TMFRunkle Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 8973 of 127714
Subject: Re: Home Inspection Date: 2/9/2000 10:20 PM
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I'm buying a new home and pretty excited. I needed some help deciding when I should have the Home Inspection done: after trades (before drywall), just before closing or a few months after I move in.

Is it worth doing at all since it is a new home?


Yes - provided you get a good inspector. The locality inspects, but it is only for code/life safety compliance. Also, you can't be too sure the local inspector will catch everything. Finally, there are cosmetic items that the local inspector is not concerned with - such as damage to floors, wall damage, so on.

The main thing is to get a good home inspector. Take time to get references, and inquire about his/her experience in qualifications.


George

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Author: TMFRunkle Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 8974 of 127714
Subject: Re: Home Inspection Date: 2/9/2000 10:23 PM
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As far as the heating/cooling, the HVAC guy is supposed to do calculations showing what the house needs. Around here, that has to be given to the building inspector as part of the process. I'm not sure if that is true everywhere.

It's not done down here in Atlanta, so that's not done in every locality. That's another thing for the home inspector to check. (and another reason you need a good one)

George

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Author: RahmYtsami Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 8975 of 127714
Subject: Re: Home Inspection Date: 2/9/2000 10:30 PM
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As far as everything being to code, that is what the municipality building inspector and underwriter labs electrical inspectors are for.

For people that don't know, all new houses are inspected. First, by the local municipality building inspector. He is supposed to be looking to see if the house meets general building code requirements, which have more to do with the design than the workmanship. Secondly, before the electrical company will hook your house up to the grid, a inspection is required by the an UL electrical inspector. Again, he is looking more at the legal requirements than the workmanship. However, those requirements are rooted deeply in safety. Thirdly, if you are on a septic, then the local health dept is supposed to do an inspection to ensure that the leach field works. Nobody want puddles of you know what coming up with the first rain. Lastly, if you are taking out a mortage and have a well, then the bank may require a test of the well to ensure that it is healthy.

With that all said, it is my experience that the local municipal inspector may not know all that much and besides he is really looking out for the municipality more so than the homeowner. Sooo, a new homeowner should have some type of workmanship/quality insection done. You could hire it out, but even if you do I'd advise you to spend a lot of time at the house during all construction stages. Bring your camera (video is best) and take a long hard look for your self. If there is anything you don't feel comfortable with, then bring it up with the General Contractor right away or even a sub who seems to be doing work. If you still don't feel comfortable, then hire somebody or find an experienced friend. And remember, your leverage expires after you fork over the dough.

Rahm

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Author: jagunlimited Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 9066 of 127714
Subject: Re: Home Inspection Date: 2/15/2000 7:20 AM
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My wife and I just had our soon to be house inspected, and I believe that it was $185 well spent. The guy was very thorough, and provided us with a 200 page (standard) report when he was done. Even though our house was new, there were still three outlets that did not have ground wires, and the sump pump drain came our the side of the house (was never drained anywhere). My advice, get a thorough inspector, ask for references. Ours climbed in the attic and did structural inspections of everything. Have them open every window, check every outlet, etc. Another thing that the inspector found was that the back door still had the shipping caulk around it. Not a big deal, but up here, that means in two years, we would've had a rotting door frame.



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