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My wife just pulled a 5 pound boneless turkey roast out of the freezer, and announced her plans to cook it Monday for the holiday.

Then she asked me how.

I have no idea. And since it costs $30, I want some suggestions about how to best prepare it.

Any ideas?

Ideally a recipe without a lot of hands-on prep time. (We don't care if it needs to marinate overnight or cooker for many hours, but we don't want to be fussing over it all day.)

(And in the previous sentence, when I wrote "we" I really meant "my wife.")
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RE: SJK: "5 pound boneless turkey roast"

I've had these, and while this isn't the exact recipe I used, the procedures will work with any seasonings you prefer.

http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1926,152161-242203,00.html

Best Wishes

SB
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My wife just pulled a 5 pound boneless turkey roast out of the freezer, and announced her plans to cook it Monday for the holiday.

Then she asked me how.

I have no idea. And since it costs $30, I want some suggestions about how to best prepare it.



No suggestions at all, unfortunately.
But I do have one question (if you'll put up with being twitted a tad!). If neither of you has any idea what to do with this $30 piece of bone-free turkey -- why did you buy it in the first place? ;-)


sheila
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My wife just pulled a 5 pound boneless turkey roast out of the freezer

When you say, "boneless turkey roast", I'm assuming that you don't mean a turkey breast or a processed turkey roast. What you've got is a turkey without the bones. So you've got both dark meat and white meat.

You can roast this the same way you would a turkey or chicken, using whatever seasonings, sauces or gravy you like.

I did a an on-line search for "boneless turkey roast" and there were lots of recipes and cooking suggestions. This one happens to be gluten-free and, according to about.com, comes from Susie Fishbein's cookbook "Kosher by Design":

Cook Time: 2 hours, 15 minutes
Ingredients:
1 (5-lb) boneless turkey roast with skin, tied
3 Tbsp olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp dried marjoram, crushed
1 tsp finely grated orange zest (optional)
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup plus 2 Tbsp maple syrup (not pancake syrup)
1/4 cup orange juice
1/2 cup dry white wine

Preparation:
Line your baking pan with heavy-duty foil. Heat oven to 450 degrees. In a small bowl, combine the oil, garlic, marjoram, orange zest, salt and pepper. Rub this spice mix all over the turkey.
Place the turkey in the pan and roast for 1/2 hour. In a small bowl, combine the maple syrup and orange juice. Pour the maple syrup glaze over the turkey. Cover loosely with foil. Reduce the temperature to 350 F and continue to roast for another 1 1/2 hours or until it reaches an internal temperature of 165 F, basting occasionally.

Let turkey stand covered with foil for 15 minutes. (It will rise five degrees during standing time.) Meanwhile, pour the glaze from the turkey into a small pot. Add the wine; cook over medium heat on the stove top about 3 to 4 minutes or until the liquid is reduced by half. Pour the glaze over the turkey.

Enjoy!

Christina
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why did you buy it in the first place? ;-)

I didn't buy it -- she did. (Since our triplets were born, we almost never go shopping together. I recall just one "family" grocery trip in the last 18 months.)

I'm tempted to ask her the same question you asked me.

But I know better than to ask!
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why did you buy it in the first place? ;-)


I'm glad I asked -- a wonderfully chuckle-worthy response! And a sweet, humorous, ironic commentary on life and relationships. ;-)

Not too late to say l'shana tovah!


sheila
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RE: shiela: " l'shana tovah!"

Yes, of course.

SB (thought maybe "the holiday" Monday was Canandian Thanksgiving!)
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thought maybe "the holiday" Monday was Canandian Thanksgiving!

Monday is also Columbus day, but the holiday I had in mind is this one:
http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday5.htm
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“thought maybe "the holiday" Monday was Canandian Thanksgiving!”

Monday is also Columbus day

Leif Erickson Day? ;-)

but the holiday I had in mind is this one:
http://www.jewfaq.org/holiday5.htm


Ah yes, that explains it. So is the roast a formed turkey roast or a turkey breast with skin & bones? If it’s the whole turkey breast, I would brine it first before roasting it.

C.J.V. - or smoking it, me
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So is the roast a formed turkey roast or a turkey breast with skin & bones?

I doubt if it's the latter as SK said it was a "boneless turkey roast".

As I noted it my earlier post, I'm assuming (for that price) what he has is a boneless turkey (which might or might not include the skin) i.e., "boneless turkey roast" --- and not a "formed turkey roast" which is, I think, a processed item that wouldn't have cost $30.

Christina
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So is the roast a formed turkey roast or a turkey breast with skin & bones?

The label just says, "boneless turkey roast." Whatever that means.

I would brine it first before roasting it.

I don't think brining kosher meat is every a good idea!

As part of the koshering process, all the birds are coated inside and out with coarse salt. (In fact, it is this use which gives course salt the name "koshering salt."

If you have a box of Morton's Kosher Salt, it even has koshering directions on the box!

From an article about Empire Kosher, the largest kosher poultry processor in the world:
Workers place each bird in a trough of coarse salt and generously rub them inside and out. About seven tons of salt a day falls to the floor during this process; Empire donates it to local municipalities for use on roads during winter. Workers place the salted birds into huge inclined bins that carry them forward slowly, letting them sit about an hour before rinsing.

This salting is one of the most distinctive features of kosher processing. The purpose of the salt is to draw out the birds' blood, which Orthodox Jews may not eat. Salting has the added benefits of evening out the birds' moisture, tenderizing their flesh, and creating a hostile environment for microorganisms.

"We put out poultry here that has the lowest microbial load of any in the country," Reed says proudly.
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I agree with C.J.V. and recommend smoking the meat.

Since your meat is already Kosher, no need to brine. Put on a dry rub. For example: paprika, pepper, some brown sugar, garlic. Let it sit with the rub in the refrigerator. Smoke it outside on the grill for approximately 2 to 3 hours. (Place the white hot charcoal and soaked wood on the opposite side of the meat. Have the upper vent half way closed.)

Barry
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Smoke it for sure.

The very best way to get the most taste and to keep it juicy.

bigpix
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Smoke it for sure.
*************
And don't forget the brine ;-}
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Brine & smoke for sure. Here's a couple of pictures from the last time I brined and smoked a turkey breast.


http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/t98/fweidner/?action=view...

http://s158.photobucket.com/albums/t98/fweidner/?action=view...

The most flavorful and moist turkey I've had.

Phred
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The most flavorful and moist turkey I've had.

Phred
****************************
Please share your brine recipe :-)
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Since your meat is already Kosher, no need to brine.

I think a lot of folks missed this point as they recommended brining.

Also, what Stephen has (or maybe "had" if they cooked it yesterday) is a "boneless turkey roast", not a turkey breast.

Lastly, and I know this will again get me in trouble on this board -- I like smoked turkey breast for sandwiches but not for a meal. Somehow or other, the smoked taste just doesn't go with the "traditional" turkey accompaniments I like with a turkey dinner. But that's just MVHO, YMMV.

Christina
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If the water solution is 3% then you can still brine it, if it is higher than that it probably would end up too salty. When you purchase a whole turkey note that it is often in a 15% solution, depending upon the brand.

Also when it is cooked this way it has very light smoked flavor, nothing like what you might get in a deli.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Apple Brine For Turkey (from Virtual Weber website)
2 quarts apple juice
1 pound brown sugar (light or dark)
1 cup Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt
3 quarts cold water
3 oranges, quartered
4 ounces fresh ginger, unpeeled and thinly sliced
15 whole cloves
6 bay leaves
6 large garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
Substitute 3/4 cup Morton Kosher Salt or 1/2 cup table salt for Diamond Crystal.

Combine apple juice, brown sugar, and salt in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring to dissolve. Boil for one minute, remove from heat, let mixture come to room temperature, then refrigerate to 40°F.

In a large non-reactive container, combine the apple juice mixture with the remaining ingredients. When adding the oranges, squeeze each piece to release the juice into the container, then drop in the peel.
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I like smoked turkey breast for sandwiches but not for a meal. Somehow or other, the smoked taste just doesn't go with the "traditional" turkey accompaniments I like with a turkey dinner.

Aha! That's why you never venture over to the Barbecue Board.

A perfectly smoked chicken or turkey is wonderful any time of year. (I'll bet you've never had a good smoked turkey. The skin should be the color of reddish chocolate. Meat, including the white meat, should be very moist and tender.) Would you like to come over to our house for Thanksgiving?

Barry
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Christina,

I should have added: a good smoked chicken or turkey does not have a strong smoked flavor. The smoke flavor is in the background. Normally I marinate my poultry with a rub for 24 hours prior to cooking. The flavors in the rub are noticed about equally with the smoked flavor.

Commercially smoked meats have much stronger smoke flavors. The producers probably added liquid smoke or the equivalent.

Barry
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I should have added: a good smoked chicken or turkey does not have a strong smoked flavor. The smoke flavor is in the background. Normally I marinate my poultry with a rub for 24 hours prior to cooking. The flavors in the rub are noticed about equally with the smoked flavor.


Ditto that! I brine and smoke chickens to stock my freezer with 1 lb bags of smoked chicken meat. It's great for sandwiches, burritos, enchiladas, etc. The smoking adds a subtle flavor. The brining makes for moist and tender meat. I also stuff the cavity of the bird with sliced onions and vegetable scraps from the freezer ("freezer garbage" - e.g. cilantro stems, spinach stems, carrot peelings, etc.) - that adds moisture and flavor during the smoking.

Here's a big tub of smoked chicken meat (2 whole chickens, smoked and picked)

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa279/oledocj/April%20200...


OleDoc
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Steven:

So....just how did your wife cook the roast?

Inquiring minds want to know.

Christina
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Aha! That's why you never venture over to the Barbecue Board.

That's one of the reasons.

I'll bet you've never had a good smoked turkey.

You'd lose that bet. I've got lots of friends who are into that "smoking is great" thing. As I said, I'll take that smoked turkey on a sandwich please, not on my dinner plate.

Would you like to come over to our house for Thanksgiving?

Thanks for the offer but I'll stick with my traditional "roasted" moist and juicy turkey, thank you.

Christina
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I guess my family is wierd (I know we are) because we like it both smoked and traditional. We usually have Thanksgiving and Christmas traditional and other times smoked. the store bought "smoked" don't compare with a good home smoked turkey, probably the liquid smoked someone mentioned.
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So....just how did your wife cook the roast?

Well, she did not roast the "roast."

She cooked it in a soup pot on our cooktop, with cut-up potatoes, and various spices, and lots of liquid.

Tasted great!
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She cooked it in a soup pot on our cooktop, with cut-up potatoes, and various spices, and lots of liquid.


Not too dry, that's for sure.
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