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Author: ssesox Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 501  
Subject: How will 3D printers change manufacturing? Date: 1/18/2013 12:12 PM
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I need some clarification for my ownership of DDD and its outrageous price. The logic for the outstading potential of 3D printing is that it will change the way we make parts and we will have them in our homes. One example that was given is if we need a new part for our dishwasher we will simply print the part on our 3D printer. I'm in the plastic parts business. How will 3D printers account for all the different plastic compounds and processes that are needed to finish plastic parts to correct hardness, durability etc. This will need to take place in a factory.....right??? Any thoughts or logic would be appreciated.
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Author: Gordogato Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Ticker Guide CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 113 of 501
Subject: Re: How will 3D printers change manufacturing? Date: 1/18/2013 2:01 PM
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I think that the thing that will make 3D printing indispensable is not here yet, so people speculate about dishwasher parts, toys, etc.

At one time, experts said that nobody would need a computer in their homes; those were only for labs and universities. They said we'd never need Internet in our homes; what would we do with it when we could get things like weather and news from the TV? They said nobody would want a tablet interface on a computer; how would people type with no keyboard?

This time around, investors are thinking that there will be a use that creates demand for 3D Printers in the home eventually, even though we can't imagine exactly what it is yet. Yes, DDD (and the whole industry) is somewhat of a risky investment in that regard, but DDD appears to be the best-positioned company for the home market in the industry if that indispensable home consumer use does come along.

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Author: lukascranac Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 114 of 501
Subject: Re: How will 3D printers change manufacturing? Date: 1/18/2013 2:09 PM
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I think the first step is going to be factories. There are such factories already. Shapeways, Materialise, Sculpteo, etc.. They cater mostly to artists or hobbyists. For example if you are a jewelry designer you can sell pretty much globally by uploading your design to these websites and let the manufacturing and shipping taken care of by these factories. All you need to worry about it marketing.

Then you will see the MrFixIt model where you walk down to corner store to get your parts printed.

The next step is probably power tool market. There's gonna be a machine in your garage performing such tasks.

And finally it might become a house hold appliance like your fridge or TV.

These machies are far from the ability to meet the kind of demands you describe. But given the amount of money pouring into R&D nowadays it is going to unfold in that direction over the next few years.

Right now its about paying 100 bucks for something you could get for $20 and get the ability of customization in exchange.

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Author: colleran Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 115 of 501
Subject: Re: How will 3D printers change manufacturing? Date: 1/18/2013 6:12 PM
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The current state of 3D Printing has been compared to the days of the Apple II. No one had any idea what would come from it and similar computers of that era. I think that the implications of 3D Printing are enormous, not just for traditional manufacturing, but for how we make things and what we make.

The problem is that any investment in 3D Printing is based on a future that no one can predict. You just have to jump in or wait until it becomes clearer.

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Author: ssesox Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 123 of 501
Subject: Re: How will 3D printers change manufacturing? Date: 1/25/2013 1:27 PM
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Thanks guys all great logic, and the stock just keeps going up! But I still can't get my arms around how a 3D printer will be used to make plastic parts in someones home or small factory. There are gazillions of different plastics and compounds. There are also many different process that are performed after a part is made that are needed to make the plastic,to make it hard, brittle, flexible, increase its stregnth,color, finish. I can't see how a 3D printer will be able to make these parts. Where and how will the printer get these materiels. Ink is one thing but there are thousands of different plastic compounds that are used in order to get the plastic parts to perform correctly. I guess since I make plastic parts I'm too close to this and I'm not thinking outside the box. Probally should sell and take my quick profit. Thanks

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Author: Hummm Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 141 of 501
Subject: Re: How will 3D printers change manufacturing? Date: 1/28/2013 11:42 PM
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I am new to MF but just wanted to make a comment and see what everyone had to say. The talk about making parts for dishwashers and frig's etc seems a bit far fetched. It assumes that most people fix their own appliances when they break. That is not the case now and I doubt it will be in the future,

I can see huge implications in the manufacturing sector for something like this. Is SSYS maybe a better play?

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