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Monday will in the European stock market will look apocalyptic.

http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/10/04/business/EU-German...
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Would you buy stock in a company called "Hypo Real Estate"?

Maybe it sounds better in German:

Hypo Real Estate Group
http://www.hyporealestate.com/index.php

Nope.

Peter
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Would you buy stock in a company called "Hypo Real Estate"?


It's from the German word "Hypothek" which refers to the German equivalent of a mortgage on a piece of land.
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AD It's from the German word "Hypothek" which refers to the German equivalent of a mortgage on a piece of land.

So it does sound better to German ears.

Has it been trendy to use English ("Real Estate") for German corporation names?

Peter
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Has it been trendy to use English ("Real Estate") for German corporation names?

Yes.
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Has it been trendy to use English ("Real Estate") for German corporation names?

Yes.


How unfortunate.


Meg (must rid herself of the idea that Europeans are less susceptible to "trendiness")
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<AD It's from the German word "Hypothek" which refers to the German equivalent of a mortgage on a piece of land.

So it does sound better to German ears>

In Spanish mortgage is hipoteca much like the German. I wonder if it comes from the same root as hypothetical. As in hypothetically speaking this loan might get paid back. ;-)

Miro
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Probably the same root as 'hypothecate', as in to put up collateral for a loan -- in this case the real estate itself.
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It's from the German word "Hypothek" which refers to the German equivalent of a mortgage on a piece of land.


So what does "hypoverein" mean?
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Could this also be the beginning of the end for the euro? What if some countries need $150-200B euro to save their banks while others need little to nothing to save their banks?
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Yes. first the Irish, then the Greek, now Germany guarantee all bank deposits. It is the beginning of the end for them too.

The European Union, at least in its present shape, will fall apart, country by country. They forgot to write the treaties that could have prevented that. And now individual panicked governments, like the Irish, do crazy things, like guaranteeing all bank deposits, even though they could never pay.

Willem Buiter writes:
"The Irish guarantee is the most ‘in-your-face’ beggar-thy-neighbour provocation since medieval armies catapulted bubonic-plague-ridden corpses into the cities they were besieging."
Amen. The problem is that there are no other tools available; Europe never thought they’d be required. The first tool you need in a crisis is realism, knowing what you're up against. I see no such thing. What I see in Europe is a sense of entitlement that is way beyond any sort of proportion, and which risks pitting countries and individuals against each other instead of working together.


http://theautomaticearth.blogspot.com/2008/10/debt-rattle-oc...
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So what does "hypoverein" mean?


Hypovereinsbank

Means something like "mortgage club bank".
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OK AD...now what the "H" does that mean?

Means something like "mortgage club bank".


a real estate mortgage is not a "club" I want to belong too....;o)

KBM (simpleton)
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a real estate mortgage is not a "club" I want to belong too....;o)


I think the Vereinsbanken are something like credit unions. Not sure though.
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In Spanish mortgage is hipoteca much like the German. I wonder if it comes from the same root as hypothetical. As in hypothetically speaking this loan might get paid back. ;-)

Miro


All these hypo variants are friendlier than the roots of "mortgage."

Mortgage: In the word mortgage, the mort- is from the Latin word mori (via old french mort) for death and -gage is from the sense of that word meaning a pledge to forfeit something of value if a debt is not repaid. So mortgage is literally a death pledge.
http://www.seek2know.net/word.html

"Death Pledge"

Can't say we weren't warned.

Peter
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