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Author: Mark0Young Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 5069  
Subject: Re: Poll: Your parents...Foolish or not? Date: 8/31/2003 3:39 PM
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I voted My parents were Fools all the way! I am convinced they were 98% the way!

they were really good about saving and LBYM, but not too Foolish at investing.

My parents did many things correctly: live below their means, dove cars until they just about had to be hauled to the junk yard (when I was growing up they had the only two cars they had purchased new, all their other cars were purchased used), had mostly simple lifestyles but they did have their hobbies (but wouldn't indulge more in them than they can afford without jeapordizing long-term goals). I didn't know it at the time, but my parents made very heavy use of "automated savings" (payroll deduction, etc.) to feed their 401(k) and 403(b) plans, savings for shorter term goals--they had saved up to send every one of us kids through college, but I was the only one who took them up on that.

Father was a long-term buy-and-hold investor. It wasn't until he passed away, Mother went to a community college and took a class on investing, and took over the investments that we learned that Father used a Fundamental Analysis approach to buy and hold ... just about forever. Since Mother tended to be more of a communicator and thought that the stock market was just "legalized gambling", I didn't learn the value of investing from my parents. My parents subscribed to Changing Times, which I read every month, and Father subscribed to The Wall Street Journal, which I would occasionally read, so I had some exposure to personal finance and investing when I was growing up, at least had some ideas about them, even though it wasn't until about twenty years after I graduated from college that I actually started any investing, and that in an expensive 403(b), and then five years later, about 4 years ago, that I also started investing with a financial advisor that I really started learning about investing in mutual funds that I went back, examined my 403(b) investments, and switched 403(b) providers to TIAA-CREF.

So, yes, I think my parents are wonderful, was probably about 98% Foolish, and while the additional 2% would have been nice, I am still 99.999% richer due to the wonderful example and moral support of my parents.
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