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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 308722  
Subject: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 4:46 PM
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Heya Folks!

There have been many posts here on the very important topic of Identity Theft, but I've noticed that one vital point doesn't seem to come up.

We all know (or should know!) that we never, never should carry a social security card in our wallets. Social Security numbers should be committed to memory. Additionally, we know (or should know!) to never give out our social security number over the phone, or to anyone unless we're 100% sure that it's necessary under certain circumstances.

With that in mind, I wonder how many people are carrying their social security numbers right now. Yep, I'll bet you that some people are reading this post while their SS #'s are sitting right inside their wallets.

Impossible?

Perhaps. But I'm not talking about Social Security cards. I'm talking about health insurance cards and/or prescription cards.

Do you have a health insurance card in your wallet right now? If so, I urge you to stop reading this post for a moment, and go find that card to see what your identification number is.

I'll wait.

Back? Good! Is your identification number the same as your social security number? If not, you're safe, and that's great. (You might want to just double check all of the important cards in your wallet while you're at it. It couldn't hurt.)

Many, many health insurance companies identify their customers by their social security numbers (mine is one of them). You need to present this card when you go to a doctor's office, hospital, and sometimes a pharmacy in the case of prescription cards. Health insurance companies have been urged to change this form of identifying customers, but they have been very slow in addressing change with this, and this is indeed a major problem--a catch 22--when you know the worst thing you can do is make this number accessible.

So what can you do?

First, call your insurance company and let them know that you do not want to be carrying this number around due to the dangers of identity fraud. In many cases, the company will be responsive and will issue you a new card with a new number. It's not a difficult problem for them to solve, and a simple phone call may be all you need.

If your company is reluctant to help with this, or to make a change, don't pull your hair out. Instead, pull your card out of your wallet and make a photostat of the card with the number blacked out. Then, put the card in a very safe and secure place where it won't be carried with you.

When you need to provide your card, just provide your photostated copy, and provide your number at the time it's needed. No one will turn you away for not having the card, as you're still providing proof of coverage. Even if there was a problem, the health care provider needs only to call the number of your insurance company for verification.

This is a very important thing to take care of for your own protection, and will be yet another aid to you in the prevention of identity theft.

Hope this was useful!

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: LuluB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150361 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 5:08 PM
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And don't forget your driver's license. Unless told otherwise, Virginia puts your SSN on your driver's license. To be issued one with an alternative number costs $5.00 - that's what I did.

I don't carry my insurance card at all. My healther insurer refuses to remove my SSN from my card, so the only time I carry it is to a doctor's appointment that I have schedule ahead of time.

Louise

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Author: NaggingFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150366 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 5:39 PM
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When you need to provide your card, just provide your photostated copy, and provide your number at the time it's needed. No one will turn you away for not having the card, as you're still providing proof of coverage. Even if there was a problem, the health care provider needs only to call the number of your insurance company for verification.

I would be interested in hearing from health care professionals if this would really work from their point of view. I realize that emergency rooms will still provide you with care with or without proof of insurance, but won't you have more of a hassle after the fact if you don't go into their database properly in the first place (ie if you're incapacitated when you arrive)?

I agree that identity theft is a problem. I just don't think it's as much of a problem as say, getting into a car accident. It's less likely to happen, and it's less dangerous. So while I wear my seatbelt everytime I get into a car, I do not think it is worth making my life more difficult to avoid identity theft. So I don't shred papers, and I'm not interested in reciting my health card number every time I have a doctor's appointment.

-Megan


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Author: BrettKing One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150369 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 6:01 PM
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And don't forget your driver's license. Unless told otherwise, Virginia puts your SSN on your driver's license. To be issued one with an alternative number costs $5.00 - that's what I did.

After moving back to VA, I just got a new VA drivers license this weekend. There's a checkbox on the application whether you want your SSN on your license or not. I said no, and when the DMV lady was reviewing it, asked me to double-check if I wanted it on there or no. I said no, and received a different number. I don't believe there was any charge for this, however. (Unless you ordered a new drivers license to replace an existing one.. I think there's a $5 fee for that)

Last time I lived here, though, (~4 years ago) the SSN was your drivers license number as well, and remember there were some stories about the DMV getting some flack over that. (Now if only they'd do something over the flack they're getting for making me wait over 6 hours Saturday morning to get my license/registration..)

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Author: autoicon One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150373 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 6:12 PM
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I would be interested in hearing from health care professionals if this would really work from their point of view. I realize that emergency rooms will still provide you with care with or without proof of insurance, but won't you have more of a hassle after the fact if you don't go into their database properly in the first place (ie if you're incapacitated when you arrive)?

Actually, I had something like this happen to me last summer.

I went on a short vacation and cleaned out my wallet prior to leaving.
One of the things I removed was my Insurance Card (since it had my
SSN on it). While out of town I was involved in a horrific accident
(a drunk driver jumped a curb and mowed me down on a sidewalk), which
left me temporarily incapacitated (concussion, dislocated elbow,
fractured ankle). Although I had no problems with the emergency
room, there were considerable hassles in dealing with the billing
and my insurance company, especially since the insurance company
claimed they weren't notified in a timely manner about the accident
and the hospital that treated me was out of plan.

Eventually everything got straightened out, but it took numerous
phone calls and follow ups to get things right. Anyway, even
though my insurance card has too much info about me on it, I carry
it with me all the time these days.

Feeling significantly better these days,
TJ




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Author: frissy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150374 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 6:12 PM
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We all know (or should know!) that we never, never should carry a social security card in our wallets. Social Security numbers should be committed to memory. Additionally, we know (or should know!) to never give out our social security number over the phone, or to anyone unless we're 100% sure that it's necessary under certain circumstances.

With that in mind, I wonder how many people are carrying their social security numbers right now. Yep, I'll bet you that some people are reading this post while their SS #'s are sitting right inside their wallets.


Yup, I do, but I'm job searching, and all the temp agencies say I *MUST* bring my SSA card with me.

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Author: FuskieFool Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Ticker Guide SC1 Red Winner of the 2010 Rule Breakers Challenge Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150375 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 6:13 PM
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Don't forget your drivers license...

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Author: FuskieFool Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Ticker Guide SC1 Red Winner of the 2010 Rule Breakers Challenge Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150376 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 6:15 PM
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Don't forget your drivers license...

Thought it bared repeating.

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Author: CassWoman Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150383 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 7:48 PM
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Yup, I do, but I'm job searching, and all the temp agencies say I *MUST* bring my SSA card with me.

I never have needed my SSA card to show an employer or anyone else. I didn't even HAVE the physical card for years and years. Showing an employer a recent pay stub will usually suffice, but sometimes a passport is necessary, too.

I've haven't ever carried my SSA card with me, and it has never been a problem.

Cassandra

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Author: fredinseoul Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150391 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 8:43 PM
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Yup, I do, but I'm job searching, and all the temp agencies say I *MUST* bring my SSA card with me

You know, I see this in employment tips all the time. Bring your SSN card. I've always wondered about that. I memorized my SSN in junior or senior high school. I had several jobs and always needed that information. Later, I joined the Army and had to use it daily.

So, I have my number memorized. I can, of course, produce the card, but what good is the card? It isn't identification. I can produce a similar card with different names. Are they using it only to make sure that an applicant has a SSN? Frankly, if asked for a SSN, legitimately, I would provide it. If they said I had to show a piece of paper, I would be irked.

Can anybody tell me why that is important?

fredinseoul

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Author: gladiame One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150392 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 9:28 PM
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Yup, I do, but I'm job searching, and all the temp agencies say I *MUST* bring my SSA card with me.

Hi Frissy,
Is this to prove that you are a legal employee in the US? If so, a US passport (even if it has expired) is legally acceptable documentation. Says so right on the back of that form they make everybody sign.

Of course, a passport may be just as valuable to identity thieves as an SS card - I'm really not sure about that. But I know that I have always been able to use mine as proof to any employer of my legal status.

HTH,
Glad
P.S. Anybody have any perspective about the dangers/pros/cons of using a passport instead of an SS Card?


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Author: rah1420 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150393 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 9:29 PM
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You know, I see this in employment tips all the time. Bring your SSN card. I've always wondered about that.

I just went through the 'new hire' process a scant two weeks ago. They had a form I think called an "I-9" form which attested to your legal right to work in the US. To prove that you were you, you had to bring either a passport or green card (or one of a couple of other "ironclad" documents) or two other forms of ID, one of which had your picture on it, or something like that. It's the second time I had to do this; when Agere spun off of Lucent, we were treated like new hires and had to do the same thing in '01.

All I know is that if you are a citizen and don't have a passport, the two easiest things to break out are a state-issued drivers' license and a social security card -- which must be an original card, and I've even taken flack because I laminated it years ago when it wasn't a big deal about being an 'original.' It was issued in 1960, and you can tell. :-{)

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Author: fredinseoul Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150399 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/27/2003 10:26 PM
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Anybody have any perspective about the dangers/pros/cons of using a passport instead of an SS Card

The passport is much more valuable overseas. If a person wants to sneak in to the US, a passport is needed. If you have a US passport it is easy to get in.

In the states, passports are not as helpful. I've shown my passport and been asked for ID, because the clerk didn't know what a passport was. (The ruckus I raised brought a manager, who resolved the situation)

I'm sure you could use a passport to establish a SSN account. I haven't done this, but it does make sense.

fredinseoul
knows where passport and towel is.

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Author: daFlufferNut Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150417 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 7:24 AM
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Tony - excellent advice. I committed my SS# to memory years ago and never regretted it. So imagine my surprise when I moved to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and was advised that my driver's license number would be my SS#!!

I pointed out the varios problems with that, that many banks and financial institions wanted your SS# as back up ID when you called in, etc. and anyone who took my wallet would have that data. I was told that, to quote Bruce Hornsby, "that's just the way it is." So I kept mine locked in my glove compartment and never wrote checks. 6 months later they abandanded the system. I was the second in line for a new one.

DaFluff.

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Author: gastrolith Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150427 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 8:32 AM
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Sounds good...

But there is a fairly large portion of the population that carries a card that has SSN on it -- and they are REQUIRED to carry it.

Government Employees.

So, what do you recommend for us unfortunate lot?

G

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Author: TMFCheeze Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150433 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 9:21 AM
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I was once a victim of identity theft. And when I described the suspect to the police sketch artist, he drew a picture of me.

A few weeks later they caught the guy, and the judge let him go. Judge said that the time spent being me was already punishment enough.

It's a tough life, lemme tell ya...

Cheeze

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Author: slaramee Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150437 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 9:57 AM
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Tony, thanks for the heads up.

However, I agree with Megan that you may find yourself in hassle territory without the SSN and actual card when dealing with healthcare based on experience.

My wife was "required" to show her insurance card to the triage nurse for signing in. My guess is any foul-up WRT to the card could be a mistake on your bill down the line. And if you've never tried to fix a medical bill in error, this is quite a chore (I have).

Also, I often need to show the insurance card to a drugsotre, even if I'm in their database and renewing a prescription. Usually, it's a function of the employee you are dealing with. Sometimes, people may have been given orders and simply follow them without interpretation. Other times, they may just be in the mood to hassle the next guy in line. And once in while, it's the only way to get the prescription if the computer is down.

But I will try calling BlueCross/Slue Shield to see if I can change our insurance card number. That is an excellent idea IMO.

-Scott (slaramee)


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Author: dianakalt Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150438 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 10:11 AM
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Yup, I do, but I'm job searching, and all the temp agencies say I *MUST* bring my SSA card with me.

This is nonsense. Unless you are actually becoming an employee of a company, there is no need for said company to have your SSA card. The only thing they should need it for is to process your tax forms/I-9, and you might not even need it then. A passport or some other forms of ID will work just fine.

d

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Author: frissy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150441 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 10:32 AM
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Nope. As an employer, a representative from the temp agency must SEE the SSA card along with a primary ID card (DL, State ID, military ID, passport), and sign the I-9 swearing that they have seen the documents.

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Author: sockwonder Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150447 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 11:01 AM
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I would be interested in hearing from health care professionals if this would really work from their point of view. I realize that emergency rooms will still provide you with care with or without proof of insurance, but won't you have more of a hassle after the fact if you don't go into their database properly in the first place (ie if you're incapacitated when you arrive)?

I'm not a healthcare professional, but... My main concern with not bringing proof (or normal proof) of insurance to any medical establishment, but especially a hospital would be the quality of care. We all know that discrimination is alive and well in many forms in this world, and people without insurance (or proof of insurance) are more than likely not given the same caliber of treatment as people with insurance (or proof of insurance). It's the same reason I'm not an organ donor on my drivers license. If the paramedics know that they might be able to save another life by using my organs, will they work as hard to save mine? I don't like the odds.

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Author: LQueiros Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150453 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 11:34 AM
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Hey Tony,

Another thing you might want to do, in case you lose your wallet, is photocopy everything you normally carry in there. Place the photocopy in a safe place.

If your wallet is lost or stolen, you will have a record of any & all items which you had with you. It makes notifying the appropriate companies easier.

This is also a good idea when you go on vacation. Make sure to include a copy of your passport, along with a copy of your wallet items, & place it in a separate location from your originals. If you should lose your passport, it will speed the replacement process at the consulate.

On the subject of social security numbers, our library was actually using them as the ID number on our library cards a while back. I complained about it & they have since revised their policy. What were they thinking? For a library card? Sheesh....

Laura

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Author: 7karen Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150455 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 11:54 AM
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I'd still want to carry the insurance card. Got mugged a few years back (usually what gets me is stupid sports accidents), so wound up in the ER w/o the card. Even though my assigned provider was connected to the hospital, and I was able to give them my SS # which they kept track with, it took SIX MONTHS to straighten the billing out.

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Author: frissy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150456 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 11:55 AM
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The SSA card isn't to prove you are you--that's what the ID is for. The SSA card is so that an agent of your employer isn't comitting perjury when they swear (on the I-9) that they have seen your proof of your right to work.

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Author: NaggingFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150461 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 12:11 PM
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sockwonder wrote:

It's the same reason I'm not an organ donor on my drivers license. If the paramedics know that they might be able to save another life by using my organs, will they work as hard to save mine? I don't like the odds.


Hmm, I think we know different sorts of paramedics. If they picked and chose who to work harder on (which I don't think they do) I think they would work harder on people who were willing to donate organs than people who weren't.

<gore warning: skip to the next post if you find this subject unsuitable for lunchtime>

























On a practical note, organs are more usable when they're harvested immediately after death, so you want to keep that heart pumping until the hospital. So paramedics might work harder to get you to the hospital alive if they knew you were an organ donor (ie, even if they saw gray matter).


-Megan

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Author: Klingedp Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150473 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 1:18 PM
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Re: Healthcare and Insurance ID cards

As someone who works for hospitals in the insurance contracting area I can give a few reasons you may want to have your actual ID card:

1) Insurance fraud- a copy of the card may not be acceptable, our hospitals have seen a huge increase of non-covered individuals bringing in a relative's ID card. I think registration staff would be more nervous about a copy of the card. We are now requiring photo ID as well as your insurance card to confirm that the patient we are seeing really is the person that has insurance.

2) Unless you copy both front and back you will not be giving the hospital all of the information that is needed (i.e. phone numbers, limitations of your plan, billing information, etc.)

3) If the hospital has any reservations about whether you have insurance or not you will probably be put in the system as a "Self Pay" meaning no insurance.

4) Many contracts that we have with the insurance companies require that we see the card.

Also, I often need to show the insurance card to a drugsotre, even if I'm in their database and renewing a prescription. Usually, it's a function of the employee you are dealing with.

Please remember that many people have changes in insurance during the year due to new jobs or employers changing coverage. It is *not* a good idea for an employee to assume that the patient has the same insurance as they did the last time they were in.

Dawn


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Author: Klingedp Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150474 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 1:23 PM
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I'm not a healthcare professional, but... My main concern with not bringing proof (or normal proof) of insurance to any medical establishment, but especially a hospital would be the quality of care. We all know that discrimination is alive and well in many forms in this world, and people without insurance (or proof of insurance) are more than likely not given the same caliber of treatment as people with insurance (or proof of insurance)

It is obvious that you are not in healthcare, otherwise you would know that what you stated above is most offensive. In a hosptial ER most of the nurses, doctors and other healthcare individuals do not know if you have insurance or what type of insurance you have.

Patients are treated for emergencies regardless of their ability to pay.

Dawn

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Author: LuluB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150480 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:18 PM
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I would be interested in hearing from health care professionals if this would really work from their point of view.

I'm not in healthcare, but here's what has worked for me. I take my insurance card in. Doctor's office photocopies my card. Then I never have to take my card with me again. However, lately they have asked for it, so I do remember to take it with me. Emergency room and pharmacy? I give them my driver's license to prove I'm me, then I provide them with my member number. That is all I've needed.

I do not think it is worth making my life more difficult to avoid identity theft.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission says that identity theft is its number one source of consumer complaints - 42 percent of all complaints, in 2001.

To me that says a lot. It isn't less likely to happen anymore.

FWIW

Louise




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Author: sockwonder Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150481 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:19 PM
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Patients are treated for emergencies regardless of their ability to pay.

Oh PLEASE. You and I (and everyone else here) KNOWS that's total BS. I don't know where YOU live (or work), but I've lived in the Philly area and Raleigh/Durham area, and here about it ALL THE TIME. You're either ignorant to the facts or in complete denial.

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Author: sockwonder Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150482 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:22 PM
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Patients are treated for emergencies regardless of their ability to pay.

Oh PLEASE. You and I (and everyone else here) KNOWS that's total BS. I don't know where YOU live (or work), but I've lived in the Philly area and Raleigh/Durham area, and here about it ALL THE TIME. You're either ignorant to the facts or in complete denial.

As a matter of fact, I've seen it with my own eyes many times in the emergency rooms of several different hospitals. Triage is based on much more than severity of injury in at least some of the major hospitals in two very large metro areas in this country. I'm talking race, gender, age, perceived income, perceived insurability, etc. If you didn't know, you do now.

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Author: dianakalt Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150485 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:44 PM
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Nope. As an employer, a representative from the temp agency must SEE the SSA card along with a primary ID card (DL, State ID, military ID, passport), and sign the I-9 swearing that they have seen the documents.

Not until you actually become an employee. Companies have a certain number of days after a person starts work to file the I-9 (something like 5 business days or something). They do not need to see your docs beforehand to meet this requirement. If you simply go in for an interview, they should not require the docs.

d

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Author: slaramee Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150487 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:52 PM
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Oh PLEASE. You and I (and everyone else here) KNOWS that's total BS. I don't know where YOU live (or work), but I've lived in the Philly area and Raleigh/Durham area, and here about it ALL THE TIME. You're either ignorant to the facts or in complete denial.

This is complete BS. My wife, who wasn't married to me until this year, had no insurance for several years (yikes) before we got married as none of her employers had it and it was way too expensive to buy individually for us at the time. Several times she had to go to the hospital, sometimes a clinic type place with regular doctors offices, sometimes ERs.

In three states and three cities, we never had any noticeable reduciton in her quality care due to her lack of insurance. Of course, paying the ER bill was tough, but a necessary evil given the circumstances.

Triage is based on severity of injury- that's why you sometimes have to wait a long time to be seen, and why anyone on insurance avoids the ER for convenience unless they need it. That's it. About the only discrimination I ever saw first hand was towards me- as I was treated (with insurance) at an ER in an urban area. My doctor was reluctant to prescribe painkillers for a broken nose given the drug traffic in the city, but was overruled by the attending.

So "everyone else here" doesn't know what you speak of. Count one person who disagrees completely with this line of thinking.

-slaramee


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Author: sockwonder Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150488 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:56 PM
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Count one person who disagrees completely with this line of thinking.

You can disagree all you want, but it's not a line of thinking. I've seen it with my own eyes, I've seen and heard it on the news, and I'm not the only one. Unfortunately, discrimination is alive and well, whether anyone wants to admit to it or not.

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Author: slaramee Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150490 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 2:59 PM
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Well, like I said, my wife has had none of this happen over several years with no insurance. So I'm not going to admit to any problem until I believe it's true- which I don't.


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Author: frissy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150492 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 3:04 PM
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They require the documents when they decide that I am "placeable". Which is usually within 20 minutes of me walking in the door and showing them my resume.

frissy
amazed that being on time, well dressed, and not afraid of computers makes her QUALIFIED!

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150519 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 4:51 PM
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I pointed out the varios problems with that, that many banks and financial institions wanted your SS# as back up ID when you called in, etc. and anyone who took my wallet would have that data. I was told that, to quote Bruce Hornsby, "that's just the way it is." So I kept mine locked in my glove compartment and never wrote checks. 6 months later they abandanded the system. I was the second in line for a new one.

Exactly!

My concern is that too often we just accept what the system tells us. If the voice on the other end of the phone says, "That's the way it is," then I say, "change it."

The bottom line is that no one else is going to look after our safety when it comes to securing our identity, so we've got to do everything in our power to safeguard it ourselves.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150521 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 5:06 PM
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Sounds good...

But there is a fairly large portion of the population that carries a card that has SSN on it -- and they are REQUIRED to carry it.

Government Employees.
So, what do you recommend for us unfortunate lot?


G,

I'd make this a crusade. It's an insane rule, and government employees shouldn't have to be forced to make it easier to become victims of identity theft. Write letters, start a campaign.

If having your SS# fall into the wrong hands means that you're liable for a lot of grief, then I believe every step necessary should be taken to keep that from happening.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150523 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 5:09 PM
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Tony, thanks for the heads up.

However, I agree with Megan that you may find yourself in hassle territory without the SSN and actual card when dealing with healthcare based on experience.

My wife was "required" to show her insurance card to the triage nurse for signing in. My guess is any foul-up WRT to the card could be a mistake on your bill down the line. And if you've never tried to fix a medical bill in error, this is quite a chore (I have).

Also, I often need to show the insurance card to a drugsotre, even if I'm in their database and renewing a prescription. Usually, it's a function of the employee you are dealing with. Sometimes, people may have been given orders and simply follow them without interpretation. Other times, they may just be in the mood to hassle the next guy in line. And once in while, it's the only way to get the prescription if the computer is down.

But I will try calling BlueCross/Slue Shield to see if I can change our insurance card number. That is an excellent idea IMO.


Scott,

What you said at the end was what my suggestion was going to be. Definitely try to do everything in your power to convince BC/BS to issue you a new number.

Then, Please let us know what the results are!

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150524 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/28/2003 5:13 PM
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Hey Tony,

Another thing you might want to do, in case you lose your wallet, is photocopy everything you normally carry in there. Place the photocopy in a safe place.

If your wallet is lost or stolen, you will have a record of any & all items which you had with you. It makes notifying the appropriate companies easier.

This is also a good idea when you go on vacation. Make sure to include a copy of your passport, along with a copy of your wallet items, & place it in a separate location from your originals. If you should lose your passport, it will speed the replacement process at the consulate.


Laura,

Brilliant! Brilliant! Brilliant!

This is such good advice and as I started responding I realized that this is something I haven't done either.

I'm doing it right now!

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: aNobleWoman Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150613 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/29/2003 3:22 PM
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Have you considered the use of the Termporary Health care card ?

I went into the emergency room at Johns Hopkins Hospital here in Baltimore on Jan 13th for a problem with my right wrist. I didn't even realize that my original Health care card was left at the Giant Food Store Pharmacy the 1st week in Jan '03 when I get a prescription filled. That was the last place I used it becuase I transferred my prescr. to that specific store.
While at the triage, 'check-in', the lady asked me for my Insurance card,
and I checked my wallet only to find it was not there. (having NEVER lost
a card of this importance before), I still had the original TEMPORARY CARD that they issued before mailing the original H-Care card. I told her
what insurance I used and stated that the card was at the Giant Pharmacy, but that I DID HAVE MY TEMP CARD they issued first. The TEMP CARD...had
a line to MANUALLY WRITE IN MY SS#...WHICH I LEFT BLANK. I gave her
the card and my SS# =VERBALLY.....this was no problem.
After getting treatment and going back to Giant to check with them for the card. They did not have it. I promptly called the insurance company
and TOLD THEM I was in the ERoom (even though my carrier does not require it), and also told them I used my TEMP CARD at the ERoom.
They agreed to send me a new 'replacement' card.

Maybe the TEMP CARD is an option, (if you keep yours), AND IF it does
not have you your SS# pre-printed on the front.

I have this replacement card...but it has my SS# displayed on it. :(

Nubian

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Author: TheHeadhunter Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150693 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 12:40 PM
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There's a movement among some states to use SSN's as drivers' license numbers. Fancy that. It's common knowledge among investigators that once you've got a person's DL and SSN, you can get anything else you want.

Keep your eyes on the news. Identity theft is now aided by the background-checking practices of corporate HR departments -- and the outsourcing of these investigations.

We'll report on that on the Ask The Headhunter board here on The Fool soon...

Cheers,

Nick Corcodilos
Ask The Headhunter

http://www.asktheheadhunter.com



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Author: susiegogo Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150697 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 1:09 PM
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OOH boy, when I first went to work at a community college, I was asked for my SS# from the people issuing IDs, from the people issuing parking permits, from the gym so they could put me in their system, from the NURSE who was testing me for TB. I complianed bitterly, and refused all. To get me in the system in the gym, we made up a number: 111-11-1111.
But all the students must use their SS#s as ID.
I was told, "that's the way we do things."
Wonder if a lawyer would encourage this to continue?
Susan

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Author: earlmedwards Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150699 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 1:44 PM
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Tony TMF2Aruba

Very interesting discussion.

I chased off for my wallet and looked for my card. Right there where I've carried it for years. Got my SS# back about 1953, and strangely my card carries a notation on the back: Form OA-702 (6-82).

Don't remember when or why I got the replacemewnt but obviously after June 1982.

Anyway, I started looking at other cards and one pooped right out at me.

My Meadicare Health Insurance card which I got last summer.
My medicare claim number is my social security number (plus "A" for Part A?) or whatever. But the SS# is prominently displayed in big bold letters. Even with deteriorated eyesight, I believe I could read it at 15 paces.

Have had no ID Theft experience, thank the Lord, but seems to drive everyone crazy.

I have a twisted solution to ID theft. Track down the person who stole your ID and shoot them - big 357 cal 120 gr load right between the eyes. Last I heard, "suicide" is the one crime they can't convict you of if you're successful, Sorry your honor, I just shot myself!
<big grin>

Part of the problem seems to be that the government never has decided what they are going to do. Is the SS# going to be your unique national identity number? Most European countries have one, and everyone carries their card because it is the law, and I never heard of any particular problems with that.

I also believe most of us are over-concerned with "privacy." Take a day or two sometime and start looking to see what you can find about yourself on the internet. Go to out-of-the-way sites. I checked the local Tax Appraisers site. First problem, I was too specific, putting in my full name and complete street address. Kept coming up blank. Finally I just input the street name, leaving off the specific number and street typ ("Royal Acres" instead of "10105 Royal Acres Ct") and the results were amazing. I got a complete lising of all my neighbors, myself included, with full detail about the property, size, layout, date of purchase etc etc etc.

Well, that's more than you wanted to hear of my story, but I did want to make everyone aware that the biggest insurer of all, Medicare, uses your SS# as your ID #.

EarlM


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Author: EastLakeview Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150700 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 1:46 PM
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Yes -- if they supply a SSA Card, if they use some other form of ID then they don't need to see the SSA Card FOR THE I-9. However, as a formed employer, I can tell you that the employer can be fined if they report income to the wrong SS#, so as an employer I'd want to see the card. It may not be legal, but if you're going thru the hiring process and refuse to show it it might red flag you and you might be a happy, non-SSA Card showing unemployed person. It's your right!

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Author: zzyp Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150701 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 2:00 PM
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What about Medicare? Will the federal government allow a Medicare provider to accept other than the official medicare card? Just as my medical insurance card has my SSN, my Medicare card has a SSN identifyer, but differs as it does not have an 800 number to call (although I suspect medical suppliers know how to contact Medicare)

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Author: ely17 Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150722 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 5:20 PM
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OK, so what do you do if your S.S. card IS stolen? My son was carrying his when his wallet was stolen (abroad) last fall. I called our local S.S. office here to report it, and they didn't seem to care much - they don't keep any record of stolen numbers. Apparently. I am concerned about the identity theft issue for him, but what do we do?

ely17

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Author: johnb1662 Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150730 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 6:35 PM
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Your advice is difficult for those of us on the downhill side of 65 -- the Federal government has decided that we all should be covered by Medicare and you can guess what ID number is used for Medicare claims.

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150731 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 6:37 PM
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OOH boy, when I first went to work at a community college, I was asked for my SS# from the people issuing IDs, from the people issuing parking permits, from the gym so they could put me in their system, from the NURSE who was testing me for TB. I complianed bitterly, and refused all. To get me in the system in the gym, we made up a number: 111-11-1111.
But all the students must use their SS#s as ID.
I was told, "that's the way we do things."
Wonder if a lawyer would encourage this to continue?


Hi Susan!

This thread just keeps getting more interesting as we find more and more situations where the bureaucracy keeps telling us they "need" our SS#'s.

Maybe we're at the foreground of a grassroots movement? What if we all banded together each time we're told "it's the way it's done" and told them we're mad as hell and we're not going to take it anymore?

This needs to be changed. I can't figure out any good reason as to why individual numbers are so hard to generate?

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150732 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 6:40 PM
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Well, that's more than you wanted to hear of my story, but I did want to make everyone aware that the biggest insurer of all, Medicare, uses your SS# as your ID #.

Great post, Earl. Thanks!

Now that we know that Medicare uses our SS#'s for Identification, I'm wondering if Medicare would allow people to carry the card with the number blacked out, providing it only when required.

Perhaps someone on Medicare could make a call or two and see if there's a definitive answer from someone who knows?

Hmmm....someone in government who can "provide a definitive answer"...perhaps that's a paradox? ;-)

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150733 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 6:44 PM
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OK, so what do you do if your S.S. card IS stolen? My son was carrying his when his wallet was stolen (abroad) last fall. I called our local S.S. office here to report it, and they didn't seem to care much - they don't keep any record of stolen numbers. Apparently. I am concerned about the identity theft issue for him, but what do we do?


Well, ely, everyone should be diligent with periodically checking their credit reports to make sure that everything is correct.

In cases like your son's, it's even more vital that he check his credit report a few times a year, in my opinion, simply because having his information out there "could" pose a risk to identity theft.

Addtionally, if he lost credit cards when his wallet was stolen, I hope that he reported this to all of the companies and cancelled those accounts right away.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150734 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 6:46 PM
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Your advice is difficult for those of us on the downhill side of 65 -- the Federal government has decided that we all should be covered by Medicare and you can guess what ID number is used for Medicare claims.

I agree, John. That's why we need to find out Medicare's take on this problem, and what possible alternatives there are.

Until that point, it's vitally important that you know where that card is at all times.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: buckaroobonzai Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150741 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 7:53 PM
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I pride myself on be a good steward of my family's SSN's. But get this...

My employer, a major university, just started to outsource the processing of its Dependent Care and similar plans. I check out the new company's website to learn how to process my first claim.

Right there on the form which you have to either mail or fax (to a computer) are the boxes for: name, address, date of birth, daytime phone number, email address (optional), a place for my signature and Social Security Number.

And this, a form that I expected to send at least monthly!

I call the company. The standard rep told me this is the way we identify people because we work with so many companies. I asked to speak with a supervior. She said that is how it is and then tried to explain at length how secure the system is and how there has never been any problem in the 5 years she has been there and that employees are simply too busy keeping up with their quota of work to commit fraud. I don't consider myself among the paranoid in this world, but I was beside myself in frustration. They claim to be working on an alternate system for identifying customers, but there is no target date. If anybody else is using SHPS, Inc. www.shps.net, please express your outrage and insist both directly and through your employer that they implement the switch to non-SSN identification immediately.

Thing is - I am already committed to the maximum $5000/yr irreverable withdrawal from my paycheck. I can't switch to my wife's Dependent Care plan which would also prevent me from using the Medical Savings account. I guess I'm just going to have to deal with it this year.

Buckaroo

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Author: CaveGirl Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150767 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/30/2003 10:56 PM
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With that in mind, I wonder how many people are carrying their social security numbers right now. Yep, I'll bet you that some people are reading this post while their SS #'s are sitting right inside their wallets.

-----------------------------

In the military world this is also true... our ID cards are cued off of our SSNs and there isn't a darn thing we can do about it.


CaveGirl


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Author: Colovion Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150781 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/31/2003 2:37 AM
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You can disagree all you want, but it's not a line of thinking. I've seen it with my own eyes, I've seen and heard it on the news, and I'm not the only one. Unfortunately, discrimination is alive and well, whether anyone wants to admit to it or not.

Actually, the fact that hospitals cannot turn anyone away is costing them literally hundreds of millions of dollars a year near the Mexican border. According to an article by Phyllis Schlafly titled "Why Healthcare Costs So Much," which can be read at: http://www.eagleforum.org/column/2003/jan03/03-01-29.shtml , illegal immigrants who make their way to hospitals have to be treated. Mexico knows this, so they send ambulances up to Texas, California, etc. Senators McCain and Kyl have even introduced a bill to split the costs of treating these illegals with the entire nation, as the $200 million price tag is causing the closure of ER's in the four border states.

So really, some may argue that the problem isn't discrimination, it is quite the opposite. ER's will treat anyone that walks in the door. I work security on a college campus, we send homeless people (who don't have insurance) to the hospital all the time for various reasons. They keep coming out alive, so I'm assuming they're getting quality care.

I've never seen nor heard of a single person being refused care or receiving substandard care from an ER based on their not having insurance. As a recent college grad I've known plenty of people without insurance who went to the ER, with nary a horror story amongst them. From the ER's point of view, they'd be in for one heck of a lawsuit if this were to happen. It would be economic suicide.

Mike

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Author: tconi Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150783 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 1/31/2003 6:09 AM
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If anybody else is using SHPS, Inc. www.shps.net, please express your outrage and insist both directly and through your employer that they implement the switch to non-SSN identification immediately.

Irony.
My company uses www.shps.net - but I am never included in any company wide mailings/distributions and I am NOT in the SHPS system and do all my paperwork by paper (not online).
My dept was transferred out of state and they have still not figured out I switched to a dept that didn't move.
SO, I am safe, because HR can't do their jobs right and if they could, my SSN would be out there for all to see.
good luck.

peace & privacy
t

I faved you for your name.....first DVD I ever bought

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Author: mizvicky Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150929 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/1/2003 11:47 AM
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1. Seems lots of people are confused about the I-9. It does NOT require a social security card. A SS card is one form of ID. If you have a passport that is all you need. Had to explain that to my new personnel department but they had to agree when they read the form.

2. I've heard that the first 3 or 5 numbers is coded based on where you were born. Is this true? A LOT of places ask for the last 4 digits of your social. If they have the last 4, and they know where you were born, aren't they fairly far along in getting your SSN?

Miz Vicky

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Author: pjohns One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150939 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/1/2003 12:58 PM
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I realize that emergency rooms will still provide you with care with or without proof of insurance, but won't you have more of a hassle after the fact if you don't go into their database properly in the first place (ie if you're incapacitated when you arrive)?

It shouldn't be a hassle. I am an honorable person--which is to say, I pay all my honest obligations promptly and in full--but I will not be intimidated by the mistakes or false assumptions of others.

If you receive a bill in the amount of, say, $50,000 or $100,000 for treatment, there is really no need to panic; just pick up a telephone and clarify the situation. Expect the provider to get things right!

And if the provider's computer continues to spit out bills and "late" notices, simply make a written reply--businesslike and polite, but with a slight sense of irritation.

After all, you have nothing for which to apologize, and no special request to make--just the reasonable expectation that the billing department should get it right.


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Author: dkron Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150976 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/2/2003 9:50 AM
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Please remember that many people have changes in insurance during the year due to new jobs or employers changing coverage. It is *not* a good idea for an employee to assume that the patient has the same insurance as they did the last time they were in.

Wouldn't this actually argue for the drugstore always calling to verify coverage - a change in coverage, with a new card, or even termination of coverage, doesn't force me to CARRY the new card or DESTROY the old one ...

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Author: 420064388 Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150985 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/2/2003 12:37 PM
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It seems obvious to me from reading these numerous posts that if someone is serious about obtaining your SS# for purposes of identity theft then it would be painfully easy to do in a number of ways. In my opinion, I don't think removing your SS card or drivers license or insurance card from your wallet is really going to do a lot of good in prevention of identity theft. So, my recommendation is to carry whatever you want in your wallet. Any thoughts?
Lee

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150989 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/2/2003 1:16 PM
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It seems obvious to me from reading these numerous posts that if someone is serious about obtaining your SS# for purposes of identity theft then it would be painfully easy to do in a number of ways.

I think the point is identity theft is a problem, and whatever we do to make it less easy for thieves is a help in protecting ourselves.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: frissy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 151003 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/2/2003 5:39 PM
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I don't have a passport, therefore, the SSA Card is required to prove I am allowed to work in the U.S.

The first 3 digits tell the state that the SSA # was issued, not necessarily where you were born. There are multiple three digit codes for each state, though. My SSA # was issued to me when I was 12. 5 years ago, a police officer who was taking a report from me commented that he had never heard the 616 prefix before. In AZ, the prefix is either 526, 527, or 600 for most SSA numbers.

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Author: Klingedp Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 151064 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/3/2003 8:30 AM
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Wouldn't this actually argue for the drugstore always calling to verify coverage - a change in coverage, with a new card, or even termination of coverage, doesn't force me to CARRY the new card or DESTROY the old one ...

Pharmacies usually check for eligibility and coverage (since not all drugs are covered by all insurance companies).

Most insurance companies have electronic ways of verifying coverage, but if the pharmacy calls the wrong insurance company (due to mis-information) they will get "not eligible" and still won't know which insurance you DO have and will charge you full price for the prescription.

You save the hassle factor on the back end when you provide accurate information to the hospitals or pharmacies. That was the point I was trying to make.

Dawn

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Author: sockwonder Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 151115 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/3/2003 3:59 PM
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From the ER's point of view, they'd be in for one heck of a lawsuit if this were to happen. It would be economic suicide.

...and yet it happens all the time.

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Author: Colovion Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 151329 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/5/2003 4:07 PM
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...and yet it happens all the time.

Great! So there should be not one, but several articles about this sort of thing out there in cyberspace, but I'd settle for one example.

Mike

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Author: joberg1 One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 151530 of 308722
Subject: Re: Identity Theft: What's in Your Wallet? Date: 2/7/2003 8:18 PM
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Thanks for your post. I lost my insurance card when my 1 year old daughter emptied my wallet in a restaurant. I was unable to find it and was very concerned about the social security number on it. As a result of reading on TMF, I posted fraud alerts with all three credit reporting companies and fortunately, I have had now problem.

I was not aware, however, that you could have the number changed on your insurance card. Great idea! Thanks!


Joberg1

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