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If True, this Would Suck


Bill

Perhaps, but I would rather have these fellows handling one of my pensions than just giving it to the politicians or a for profit bank or investment firm to play with?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Pension_Plan#CPP_Investm...

Under the direction of then Finance Minister Paul Martin, the CPP Investment Board (CPPIB) was created in 1997 as an organization independent of the government to monitor and invest the funds held by the CPP. In turn, the CPP Investment Board created the CPP Reserve Fund. The CPP Investment Board is a crown corporation created by an Act of Parliament. It reports quarterly on its performance, has a professional management team to oversee the operation of various aspects of the CPP reserve fund and also to plan changes in direction, and a board of directors that is accountable to but independent from the federal government.


They actually haven't done too bad though I confess I haven't done a lot of research on them.

http://www.cppib.ca/

I had some personal issues with the whole Canada Pension Plan as I started paying into my military pension plan in 1964 then started paying into both when CPP was implemented in 1966. The government decided around 1972 that the outcome would be too generous and changed the rules so the effective when I turned 65 they would reduce my military pension by a percentage of what CPP was adding to the mix.


Any <here for the beer> mouse
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We have the SEC, we have FINRA, I see no reason why we would need yet another agency trying to police this industry.

If the previous two would simply do their job, this would not even be up for discussion - and I seriously doubt adding a third chief would do anything more than just muck it up worse.
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Bill

What about that article made you comment as you did?

Poz
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Somewhat related. The video is somewhat less downbeat than the text.


Any <retired> mouse


http://www.bnn.ca/News/2013/2/1/Whatever-happened-to-Freedom...

Whatever happened to Freedom 55?

BLOG: Freedom 55 was a marketing campaign from London Life Insurance in the mid 1980s that exemplified the optimism of a 25 year bull market in its early stages. The ads showed healthy middle-aged couples climbing mountains and sailing into the sunset.

Fast forward to the post 2007 financial meltdown and Freedom 55 has become a cruel joke. A recent survey by Sun Life Financial found the average Canadian now expects to retire at 68 - a full year more than expectations from the previous year's survey.
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