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Author: intercst Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 753938  
Subject: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exercise Date: 8/12/2001 5:44 PM
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Just received this from a retired colleague:

"It is well documented that for every minute that you exercise, you add one minute to your life. This enables you at 85 years old to spend an additional 5 months in a nursing home at $5000 per month."

intercst
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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 47889 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/12/2001 6:48 PM
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Just received this from a retired colleague:

"It is well documented that for every minute that you exercise, you add one minute to your life. This enables you at 85 years old to spend an additional 5 months in a nursing home at $5000 per month."

intercst


My wife and I are members of an International Dinners Group; it is an intrest group in the UT Faculty Women's club. Anyway we get together at various members homes for various theme dinners. Anyway we were at one old retired Chemistry Professors home (he and his wife are both from England and have strong accents) and another old professor (head of Biochemistry) and his wife, both of whom excersize and who I might add have significant health problems, were talking about their excesize regimen. The old Chemistry prof goes in his thick British accent, "Oh, believe all that and go in for that do you?" The other professor was speechless. What is funny is that the old British couple are healthy and active and the other excersizing couple are in really bad shape. It was pretty funny and made me think.

A few years ago I was excersizing hard and getting in good shape. I was riding my bike and swimming 1/2 mile every day. I started doing the "stairmaster" and a few weeks into it something happened in my hips and it was like a knife was stabbing me. I went to the doctor and he X-rayed me and said I had bad arthritis in both my hips and bone spurs all up and down my spine. He said if one of them break I'm going to be in bad shape. I've been in pain every day since then. It is one of the reasons I'm not crazy about going back to work.

When you are in pain the idea of being in a nursing home and a few extra years of pain aren't all that appealing. When I can't get around anymore I would rather have a massive heart attack. I read somewhere that most people who make it past 80 have serious health problems. I'm sure I'll hear some argument about someone they know who is 96 and still runs the decathalon; but remember they are the exception to the rule. - Art

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Author: RhythmMan One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 47890 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/12/2001 7:14 PM
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I don't know that exercise will extend my lifespan all that much, I just do it to improve the *quality* of my life.

My dad is 70, pretty trim, watches what he eats & tries to stay in reasonable shape. He still rides streetbikes, dirtbikes, bicycles & rollerblades. On a family vacation he'll jet ski or scuba dive, and plays in the surf quite a bit with his grandkids.

My 68 year old mother, on the other hand, smoked heavily most of her life, eats poorly, and much prefers drug therapies to lifestyle modification given a choice. Her stamina is such that she often stops halfway up a flight of steps to catch her breath. The grandkids carry her towel & folding chair to the beach, where she pretty much stays put.

I don't know which one of them will outlive the other (though I do have a hunch), but my dad seems to enjoy himself more. He often counsels me, "It's not really about how much MONEY you have in retirement, but rather how good your health is that determines how happy you'll be."

RM

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Author: jaroman Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 47892 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/12/2001 7:25 PM
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I've been a lurker here and have learned alot. My husband is a number of years older and took the "package" from a big oil co. Needless to say, since I am the mohey manager, we are now retired early.
I am a certified personal fitness trainer.
My humble opinion on regular exercise: it really is for the quality of your life!
After doing it for awhile, you will love it. It can and does make you feel better. Sure, you could drop dead while working out, but that beats that nursing home. Exercising cannot evade osteoarthritis or other physiologic problems; it helps you manage them.
Yours in health,
jaroman

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Author: bill2975 Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 47951 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/13/2001 11:58 AM
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Hi, jaroman,

As a personal fitness trainer, what types of exercise do you recommend for people, just as a general approach?

I guess what I'm really asking is - if you are working with an individual, how do you go about designing an exercise program that fits that individual, and what types of exercises do you think should be included (strength, endurance, stretching, aerobics, etc.)?

bill2975, who is working on putting together a regular exercise program now that he has achieved FIRE, and is interested in other peoples' input

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Author: TheBreeze Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 47956 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/13/2001 12:29 PM
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I don't know that exercise will extend my lifespan all that much, I just do it to improve the *quality* of my life.

I'll second that. Who says that *lack* of exercize means that you won't live as long, but WILL live those years healthily? Nobody says that a 50 year old has to pump iron 'til his joints ache, or that he has to run a marathon every day so that his knees become arthritic. However, there are many benefits to moderate exercize. For example, nothing I eat or don't eat seems to bring my cholesterol number into the "good" zone. However, I started lifting weights as part of a pre- and post-surgery rehab. My "good" cholesterol number _doubled_. Since the ratio of good to bad cholesterol is very important, I reduced the ratio by 50%. Being able to avoid a heart attack is a great goal, not even counting the LBYM aspect! It's also nice to be able to play catch or go bike riding with the kids, or climb up the stairway at work without gagging.

I work out in my basement gym, and usually do it while watching TV. No lost time, no lost money.

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Author: warrl Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48011 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/13/2001 8:01 PM
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I read somewhere that most people who make it past 80 have serious health problems.

I suppose it depends on what one means by "serious".

I read once that when a man over 70 dies and they do an autopsy, they are more than 60% likely to find prostate cancer - regardless of his health immediately prior to his death. However, as with several other organ-specific cancers, there are several sorts of prostate cancer, and the ones that account for 90%+ of these discoveries are of the sort that, AFTER they cause symptoms enough to get detected, will (if untreated) kill the patient in another 40 years.

In other words, not a critical matter to the average 70-year-old.

(Then there are these other sorts that will often kill a patient in less than a year...)

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Author: telegraph Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48023 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/13/2001 9:03 PM
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""It is well documented that for every minute that you exercise, you add one minute to your life. This enables you at 85 years old to spend an additional 5 months in a nursing home at $5000 per month."

I don't think too many men would argue with making to 84 or 85, in good condition, and ONLY spending five months in a nursing home, as opposed to some obese non-exercising person who hasn't been able to walk 500 feet for the last 15 years of his/her life........and dies five months earlier after a miserable life for the last 15 years....sitting on the sofa or in bed eating bags of potato chips....

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Author: SeattlePioneer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48038 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/14/2001 1:26 AM
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<<Just received this from a retired colleague:

"It is well documented that for every minute that you exercise, you add one minute to your life. This enables you at 85 years old to spend an additional 5 months in a nursing home at $5000 per month."

intercst
>>


Heh, heh! A good joke, but I doubt that it's true.


My own observation is that people who exercise as they age keep themselves able to be active and lead a varied life.

Eventually, some kind of disability will sap your ability to exercise, and that usually begins a period of rather rapid deterioration. So my aim is to keep up with an exercise program as long as I can. My biggest problem is a tendency towards laziness, although I'm running 3 miles per day almost every day right now.


Heck, even a round of GOLF is probably a help in this regard!



Seattle Pioneer

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48042 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/14/2001 1:42 AM
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I don't think too many men would argue with making to 84 or 85, in good condition, and ONLY spending five months in a nursing home, as opposed to some obese non-exercising person who hasn't been able to walk 500 feet for the last 15 years of his/her life........and dies five months earlier after a miserable life for the last 15 years....sitting on the sofa or in bed eating bags of potato chips....

Just remember that "obese" non-excersizing person may have bad arthritis that they inherited from their mother. I have arthritis in my hips and long claw like bone spurs going down my spine. This not something that comes from a sedentary lifestyle; it is genetic. The arthritis is like knives being jammed in my hips every morning. How would you like to wake up to that every morning? I was excersizing by riding my bicycle 7 miles a day and swimming 1/2 a mile a day until I woke up one day and it felt like someone was jamming a 6" boning knife in my hips. So much for excersize. Predjudice is predjudice regardless of who it is aimed at. Don't judge someone until you have walked a mile in their moccasins. - Art



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Author: jaroman Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48053 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/14/2001 7:18 AM
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Bill,
Hello again!
All three aspects of fitness need to be addressed:strength,endurance, and flexibility. Any program should be geared to the individual's goals and health history.
Julie

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Author: SeattlePioneer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48079 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/14/2001 12:30 PM
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<<I don't think too many men would argue with making to 84 or 85, in good condition, and ONLY spending five months in a nursing home, as opposed to some obese non-exercising person who hasn't been able to walk 500 feet for the last 15 years of his/her life........and dies five months earlier after a miserable life for the last 15 years....sitting on the sofa or in bed eating bags of potato chips....

Just remember that "obese" non-excersizing person may have bad arthritis that they inherited from their mother. I have arthritis in my hips and long claw like bone spurs going down my spine. This not something that comes from a sedentary lifestyle; it is genetic. The arthritis is like knives being jammed in my hips every morning. How would you like to wake up to that every morning? I was excersizing by riding my bicycle 7 miles a day and swimming 1/2 a mile a day until I woke up one day and it felt like someone was jamming a 6" boning knife in my hips. So much for excersize. Predjudice is predjudice regardless of who it is aimed at. Don't judge someone until you have walked a mile in their moccasins. - Art
>>


Perhaps those barbs were aimed at me.


After being in good shape and running for 15 years, I quit in 1992 because I was lazy and got too busy. My weight ballooned and my fitness level fell until last year, when I climbed back on the exercise wagon because of the leisure time I gained from early retirement. The excess weight is declining slowly but steadily, and I've changed and improved my diet. I've decided that working is an unhealthy lifestyle.


Sooner or later we will all have our exercise patterns reduced, changed and eliminated due to disability. Personally, I think some social pressure to keep people active is a good thing. But I'd consider it directed towards people who can and should be exercising, not those who can't do so because of disability.



Seattle Pioneer




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Author: telegraph Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48168 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/15/2001 11:33 AM
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"I have arthritis in my hips and long claw like bone spurs going down my spine. This not something that comes from a sedentary lifestyle; it is genetic. The arthritis is like knives being jammed in my hips every morning. How would you like to wake up to that every morning? I was excersizing by riding my bicycle 7 miles a day and swimming 1/2 a mile a day until I woke up one day and it felt like someone was jamming a 6" boning knife in my hips. So much for excersize"

Not a fun situation, but my 80 year old mother, before she died at nearly 82, had arthritis and bad back for 15-20 years, had many days it was "hard" to get out of bed, but she did, and still wanted to go to gym every other day to do what exercises she could - which was quite a lot. Took her aspirin, and later some stronger stuff for arthriits.....helped but sure didn't 'cure' it.

In some cases, arthritis is aggravated in many people by being overweight and overstressing joints for 30 or 40 or 50 years - someone 50 or 100 lbs overweight is 'overloading' many body parts, and they deterioate faster.

Same with diabetes



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Author: derf909 One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48198 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/15/2001 3:18 PM
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Ariechert wrote:

I have arthritis in my hips and long claw like bone spurs going down my spine. This not something that comes from a sedentary lifestyle; it is genetic. The arthritis is like knives being jammed in my hips every morning. How would you like to wake up to that every morning? I was excersizing by riding my bicycle 7 miles a day and swimming 1/2 a mile a day until I woke up one day and it felt like someone was jamming a 6" boning knife in my hips

Art-
Am wondering if you know whether your exercise routinm aggravated your
(as the insurance folk call it) "pre-existing conditions"?

As for anyone else who might know-
As for exercise, how much is too much? We've all heard of those who run, etc who later in life are struck down with arthritis in the knees.
I'm wondering about the risks taken in my exercise routine. Perhaps I should switch to something else before it's too late.

d

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48201 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/15/2001 3:30 PM
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Art-
Am wondering if you know whether your exercise routinm aggravated your
(as the insurance folk call it) "pre-existing conditions"?


Before I started I had no pain whatsoever. When I went to Key West I rode my bike 10 miles around the island every day. I was getting buff. All my friends at work were telling me if I kept it up I was going to look like Arnold Schwarnegger. That is when I started the stairmaster. About a week into it I woke up with a terrible pain in my hip. It happened all of a sudden. There wasn't any warning or anything. So I went to work and of course my macho guy friends told me, "you got to work it out," "work through it", "you'll get over it." And so like an idiot, I listened to them. It didn't go away. It got worse and moved over to my other hip. That is when I finally broke down and went to the doctor and he X-rayed my back and hips. He showed me the x-rays and the white around the acetabulum was extremely visible. He told me it was osteoarthritis and said I would have to have hip replacements one day. He then showed me the spurs (look just like a roosters spurs) on the inside of my spine pointing in towards my abdomen. The were just as plain as they could be. They were long and thin and the tips were sharp! He said if one of them broke off I would be in big trouble. He also told me that I should quit excersizing and let my hips heal. They don't hurt near as bad as they did but they still hurt some. The doctor prescribed Naproxen Sodium for the pain and sent me home. When it gets really bad I guess I will have to break down and hip replacement surgery. I figure the longer I wait the more advanced the surgery will get. Also they don't last forever so if I wait long enough I'll only have to have it done once. My brother, who it thin, has pain in his hips also. So does my baby sister, she is thin also. My brother's daughter told me her hips have started to hurt her. I can remember my mother telling me her hips hurt her. Thanks Mom! It is something I inherited and has nothing to do with weight. It has to do with who my parents were. - Art


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Author: BeanieMike One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48209 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/15/2001 4:04 PM
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derf909 wrote:

I'm wondering about the risks taken in my exercise routine. Perhaps I should switch to something else before it's too late.

Ahh, the age-old question. Can't speak as one with severe ailments yet [other than bad heart and chrondomalacia patella. . . whatever - kneecap rubs on bone] but personally, I've been successful listening more to my body than to the Dr's. Used to take meds for irregular heartbeat, hypertension, high blood pressure and told years ago to quit running.

To make a long story short, I don't take any Rx drugs [knock on wood], work out regularly at the gym and cycle a lot. When I get new aches, pains and strains, I lighten up. The key is to really find the correct [i.e. non-injurious] way to exercise. I read up on this stuff as much as possible. Found that few “trainers” really emphasize how to use weights/machines to avoid joint injuries, and most people I see in the gym are not doing their routines correctly. For the knees, I don't do full squats or any twisting/jumping exercise or activity [e.g. basketball] but cycling with the proper frame setup is great. Also use a cho-pat strap on knee altho Dr. says it doesn't do anything. My head thinks it does. so I'll keep using it. My routine is very flexible - I workout when I feel o.k. and don't when I don't. Days at the gym and miles in the saddle aren't that important.

Bottom line: We're are “pre-disposed” to illnesses, ailments, and general breaking down with age. I'd suggest looking at all forms of exercise, activities, sports, yoga, tai chi, etc. and do a variety of things that makes you feel good besides just focusing on an “exercise routine.” Even CF could be a Chippendale dancer!

[BTW, love those SNL references.]

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Author: arrete Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48225 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/15/2001 6:12 PM
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derf909 says: As for exercise, how much is too much? We've all heard of those who run, etc who later in life are struck down with arthritis in the knees. I'm wondering about the risks taken in my exercise routine. Perhaps I should switch to something else before it's too late. As for exercise, how much is too much? We've all heard of those who run, etc who later in life are struck down with arthritis in the knees. I'm wondering about the risks taken in my exercise routine. Perhaps I should switch to something else before it's too late.

I've been an avid exerciser - on and off. Why? Well, like Art, I have osteoarthritis in my back. Last time around I discovered that exercise - no matter whether it was as mild as a recumbent bike - hurt my back. I did go to a rheumatologist, and he was horrified by my doing weights, except at very minimal levels. So right now I just do stretching and am thinking of giving my recumbent bike another whirl. When your family history has both heart problems and arthritis, life isn't easy - all the advice is contradictory.

arrete - family history can be a bear


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Author: ogrecat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48232 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/15/2001 8:47 PM
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My brother, who it thin, has pain in his hips also. So does my baby sister, she is thin also. My brother's daughter told me her hips have started to hurt her. I can remember my mother telling me her hips hurt her. Thanks Mom! It is something I inherited and has nothing to do with weight. It has to do with who my parents were. - Art

I inherited the crippling arthritis from my mother who got it from her father, others in the family don't have it. (Another reason not to have children.) I live alone, and worry about not being able to get up some morning; thinking of having cheap phone in every room just in case. Early retirement (before 60) seems like a good idea, but I realize that I can't do many of the things I once imagined. Even gardening has become difficult.

I am overweight and this does aggrevate (but not cause) the arthritis. I swear I will smack the next person that suggests running or aerobics as a way to lose weight.

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48237 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 12:10 AM
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I am overweight and this does aggrevate (but not cause) the arthritis. I swear I will smack the next person that suggests running or aerobics as a way to lose weight. - ogrecat

Thank You! I can remember before I hurt all the time how it felt; how I could hop on my bicycle and ride over to the Aquatic Center and swim. When you don't feel good, even though I'm not immobile, it just doesn't feel good to excersize. People always reference how much longer I'd live. Like that's a good thing? If you hurt all the time living to 80 or 90 isn't all that attractive. One of the reasons I chose to seek early retirement is because I do hurt. - Art



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Author: tutone Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48250 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 9:45 AM
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As for anyone else who might know-
As for exercise, how much is too much? We've all heard of those who run, etc who later in life are struck down with arthritis in the knees.
I'm wondering about the risks taken in my exercise routine. Perhaps I should switch to something else before it's too late.


The myths about running causing arthritis have been around for a long time, but there is no evidence to back them up. In fact, actively using your muscles and joints is the surest way to make sure they keep functioning.

I recently competed in a race called Ironman California, a 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike, and 26 mile run. A 78 year old man named Bill Bell completed the course. At least in his case, running doesn't seem to have caused arthritis.

I think when it comes right down to it, that most people are basically lazy when it comes to exercise. The "running causes arthritis" stories are convenient excuses to avoid getting off the couch. The unfortunate result however, is that they never get to experience the joy that comes with movement and competition.

tutone

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Author: arrete Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48251 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 9:57 AM
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I think when it comes right down to it, that most people are basically lazy when it comes to exercise. The "running causes arthritis" stories are convenient excuses to avoid getting off the couch. The unfortunate result however, is that they never get to experience the joy that comes with movement and competition.

I love to run. I have been in many races. I ran for 18 years. I can't run anymore because it is too painful. I don't know if running causes arthritis, but it can certainly aggravate it. Not everyone who doesn't run is lazy - maybe they just hurt.

arrete

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Author: tutone Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48252 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 10:15 AM
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I love to run. I have been in many races. I ran for 18 years. I can't run anymore because it is too painful. I don't know if running causes arthritis, but it can certainly aggravate it. Not everyone who doesn't run is lazy - maybe they just hurt.


Fair enough. And I feel for you. I've been injured in the past, and I went nuts waiting for things to heal. Not being able to run would be a serious blow to my happiness.

On the other hand, my observations of friends and family is that the ones who are the most out of shape, and the least likely to exercise, are the same ones who think I'm nuts because I enjoy it so much. They tell me I'm going to have lots of problems later in life. Then they gripe about their high colesterol, lack of energy, being overweight, etc.

tutone


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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48265 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 12:09 PM
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I think when it comes right down to it, that most people are basically lazy when it comes to exercise. The "running causes arthritis" stories are convenient excuses to avoid getting off the couch. The unfortunate result however, is that they never get to experience the joy that comes with movement and competition.

tutone


I would just like to go on record as saying that I never said that running causes arthritis. I already had the arthritis and didn't know it. The excersizing that I was doing aggravated the arthritis. The way it does this is by causing inflammation of the joints. The grating of calcium against bone isn't a pleasant thing. If you haven't ever experienced just take a knife and jam it into your hip and you will have a good idea of what it feels like. And if you hurt like hell you sure as hell don't feel like doing anything except taking drugs and feeling sorry for yourself.
- Art

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Author: ogrecat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48269 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 12:25 PM
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The grating of calcium against bone isn't a pleasant thing. If you haven't ever experienced just take a knife and jam it into your hip and you will have a good idea of what it feels like. And if you hurt like hell you sure as hell don't feel like doing anything except taking drugs and feeling sorry for yourself.

I've seen my arthritis on xrays. Take that nice smooth ball and socket shoulder joint and sprinkle in some sand. That's how it feels too. Same for the knees with the occasional added click or snap as the patella slides in and out of position.


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Author: jjbklb Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48274 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 1:21 PM
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My knees bothered me after jogging.I bought a pair of KANGOO BOOTS.They
look like a pair of ski boots with a leaf spring for a sole.It converts the impact of your leg hitting the concrete into a bounce from the spring.No more pain,&their fun.

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Author: golfwaymore Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48329 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/16/2001 9:17 PM
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The excersizing that I was doing aggravated the arthritis. The way it does this is by causing inflammation of the joints. The grating of calcium against bone isn't a pleasant thing. If you haven't ever experienced just take a knife and jam it into your hip and you will have a good idea of what it feels like.

I think there are probably several different type of arthritic conditions.

Also, I think different people's bodies probably react to arthritic conditions differently.

I'm 30, soon to be 31. At 29 I was diagnosed with an arthritic hip condition as well as the spurs you referenced in the vertebrate. How that happens at 29 - I have no idea.

I took Vioxx and that helped a bit. But as for me, what helped the most was a regular excercise program. I started with Taebo (really hard on the back), then switched to free weights, bike machine, walking etc...

Initially, I only excercised 30 minutes per day. The excercise made my joints feel so much better that I've been excersicing at least 1.5 hours per day for a long time now.

If I miss a couple of days of working out, the first thing I notice is the hip begins feeling very rusty and painful again. For me, excercise and keeping the joints moving helps to manage the pain of the arthritis.

No one knows your body better than you. However, I wonder if you have tried any lower impact physical activity in lieu of the running/biking which can be tough on the joints?

Golfwaymore

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Author: carylanne Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48454 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/18/2001 9:29 AM
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Art, you will probably find that a hip replacement is the best thing that could occur for you to regain comfortable mobility. I have a 78 year old neighbor who had a hip replacement. His was a newer type replacement that allows the bone to grow into a structure that is a rigid mesh thus creating a stronger and longer lived joint ( I hope I understood him correctly). He anticipates that he will not have to replace the replacement, so to speak, unlike earlier replacement types. He is back on the golf course after 6 months of physical therapy. Of course the specialist, his/her skills and preferences all prevail. Then there is medicare that only wants to make one replacement for each joint in your life so will prolong the agony (literally) until late in your life if they can get away with it.

My FIL had very bad knees from milking cows all his working life. He had always been very active until walking became too painful because of the lack of cartilage and the movement of the kneecap when striding. He had each knee joint replaced over the last 7 or 8 years and is back bowling and walks 4 miles a day.

The spurs on the vertebrae are much trickier. Ouch!!!!

Perhaps you will experience similar improvements in your life quality with hip and/or knee joint replacement. Good luck and God bless.

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Author: SeattlePioneer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48459 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/18/2001 12:10 PM
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<<Art, you will probably find that a hip replacement is the best thing that could occur for you to regain comfortable mobility. I have a 78 year old neighbor who had a hip replacement. His was a newer type replacement that allows the bone to grow into a structure that is a rigid mesh thus creating a stronger and longer lived joint ( I hope I understood him correctly). He anticipates that he will not have to replace the replacement, so to speak, unlike earlier replacement types. He is back on the golf course after 6 months of physical therapy. Of course the specialist, his/her skills and preferences all prevail. Then there is medicare that only wants to make one replacement for each joint in your life so will prolong the agony (literally) until late in your life if they can get away with it.
>>


I have an aunt who is 82 and has had four hip replacements in the same joint.



Seattle Pioneer

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Author: Savagegrace Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48577 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/20/2001 11:20 AM
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His was a newer type replacement that allows the bone to grow into a structure....

This is what I've been waiting for. Several years ago there were 3 new up and coming hip therapies. One involved sterilized coral as a building matrix, another a synthetic sacrifical matrix that the cartilage replaced. The final was microfissuring on the end of the ball joint and allowing bone marrow to form a protective covering.

So tell us Carylanne, is this going mainstream or was your neighbor in a test group? And the cost?

Just a few months ago I got the old story of the old type of hip replacement.

I've just been biding my time waiting for this. (Also trying other things)

So tell us more, please!

GS

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Author: betalife Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48638 of 753938
Subject: Re: Important Research Bulletin on Health & Exer Date: 8/21/2001 6:21 AM
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I am middle-aged and pain free (except when I have to listen to daytime TV). I excercise because it reduces stress and makes me feel better overall. Even when I can no longer get around, I want to live as long as I can either hear or see. I have thousands of books I'd like to read and there is always new music to be discovered and the lilt of a pleasing female voice. I hope I live to be 130. I want to hold my great grandchildren.

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