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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 127356  
Subject: Installing shut-off valves? Date: 1/13/2004 9:11 PM
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I've torn all the tile off my bathtub enclosure and the hot and cold feeder pipes are sitting in there with easy access. I want to disconnect the tub's plumbing and lift it out.

A person more knowledgable than I looked at the faucet fittings and said they were soldered. He recommended I get a pipe cutter, cut off the feeds lower down, then fit them with the kind of shut-off valves that tighten up from the water pressure, since there will be no threads.

I'm asking for a second (and more) opinion. Since I've never done any plumbing more advanced than changing a washer, is this reasonably easy for a beginner? If I screw it up the water to the entire house will be shut off long enough to make DW very unhappy with me while we wait for the emergency plumber.

Then there's the cost. What does a low-end pipe cutter go for? If I decide to have a plumber do it, I can shut off the water to the house and start draining it before he comes to save his time, right?

Thanks.

--fleg
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Author: jiml8 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44616 of 127356
Subject: Re: Installing shut-off valves? Date: 1/13/2004 9:52 PM
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He recommended I get a pipe cutter, cut off the feeds lower down, then fit them with the kind of shut-off valves that tighten up from the water pressure, since there will be no threads.

I've never heard of that type of shut-off valve. Do you mean valves with compression fittings?

I would NEVER use compression fittings inside a wall. It is not uncommon for them to begin to leak after awhile, and if they're inside the wall, well guess what. Since you are talking shut-offs, I have to presume there will be an access panel available which could make it possible to service those shut offs if they did leak, so maybe compression fittings would be OK. Still, my preference would be soldered valves.

Then there's the cost. What does a low-end pipe cutter go for?

A pipe cutter can be had for well under $10.


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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44627 of 127356
Subject: Re: Installing shut-off valves? Date: 1/14/2004 7:29 AM
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I would NEVER use compression fittings inside a wall. It is not uncommon for them to begin to leak after awhile, and if they're inside the wall, well guess what.

I would agree that compression fittings are a very bad choice for inside a wall. Especially one which will have tile or other covering, making it doubly hard to get back in. That's what sweat fittings are for; they are a permanent solution for inside walls.

then fit them with the kind of shut-off valves that tighten up from the water pressure, since there will be no threads.

There are "no threads" in sweat fittings, either. It's pipe to pipe, with solder melted into the joint to seal it permanently. I wouldn't even use "threaded" fittings behind a bathroom wall unless I couldn't avoid it.

Sweat fittings are not so tough to do, but I probably wouldn't make my first try behind a wall that gets covered by tile or a fiberglass shower enclosure. Basically it requires a torch, some emery paper, and bit of solder, and a little bit of technique, but not really so much as to put it in the "difficult" category.

A pipe cutter can be had for well under $10.

There are ones the size of a key fob (to lock your car doors) for use in very tight places (like you're describing, probably) and there are larger ones which give you a little more leverage and are easier to use, assuming you have the space. They're $10 to $20. I recently had to replace the cutting wheel on one, for which they charged me $9 for a two-pack. That frosted me, as if I'll ever be able to find the second one 4 years from now.
 


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Author: SeattlePioneer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44630 of 127356
Subject: Re: Installing shut-off valves? Date: 1/14/2004 7:47 AM
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<<I've torn all the tile off my bathtub enclosure and the hot and cold feeder pipes are sitting in there with easy access. I want to disconnect the tub's plumbing and lift it out.
>>


I agree with the other people posting that using compression fittings behind a wall is a poor idea. But why do you want to remove the plumbing in the first place? My aim would be to leave it undisturbed unless there was good reason to mess with it.



Seattle Pioneer

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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44655 of 127356
Subject: Re: Installing shut-off valves? Date: 1/14/2004 1:37 PM
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I agree with the other people posting that using compression fittings behind a wall is a poor idea. But why do you want to remove the plumbing in the first place? My aim would be to leave it undisturbed unless there was good reason to mess with it.

One problem with not knowing anything about what you're asking is inadvertently leaving out data which you don't know is important to get the question answered.

I want to disconnect the plumbing to the tub so I can remove the tub. Then I'm going to put another tub in there, a tub of different size which will require the surround to be rebuilt. I was thinking of shutoff valves as a way of shutting the water off between tubs, then having a pro plumber hook up the new tub from the shutoff valves to the new faucets. The pipes aren't in a wall--they come out of the floor inside the tub surround frame. I plan to replace the tile on the front of the frame with bead board and have part of it be a removable panel for easy plumbing access.

Thanks again for the replies.

--fleg


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Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 44656 of 127356
Subject: Re: Installing shut-off valves? Date: 1/14/2004 1:50 PM
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I was thinking of shutoff valves as a way of shutting the water off between tubs, then having a pro plumber hook up the new tub from the shutoff valves to the new faucets.

Well, that changes everything.

I think all of us thought you were looking for a permanent set-up. To close up the pipe for a couple weeks, or whatever, with a couple of compression fittings would be a lot cheaper than bringing a plumber in twice.

Put it back together with a pro, however.

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