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Anyone else ever get P.O.'ed when people seem not to know any rules of grammar? Please give examples.
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I just wrote a lengthy e-mail at work (which my supervisor is now reviewing before it's sent out to the rest of the team) regarding the use of the apostrophe.

Quite a number of people seem to believe that any word that ends with s deserves an apostrophe. I've tried to make clear the difference between a plural and a possessive. I give examples, I clarify, I explain the exceptions, I note the difference between its (the possessive) and it's (the contraction).

I am willing to bet that it doesn't help.

Has anyone noticed how no one on the boards seems to notice the difference between lose and loose?

Nancy
who has just added this board to her favorites.
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Anyone else ever get P.O.'ed when people seem not to know any rules of grammar? Please give examples.

You mean like a sign in Food Lion (yes! let's name names!!!) saying "Banana's 58¢/lb."? And it wasn't handwritten, either. It was machine-produced.

Why does a banana own 58¢/lb.? That's what I want to know.

phantomdiver
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Has anyone noticed how no one on the boards seems to notice the difference between lose and loose? Windowseat<i/>

Yep. People, 'lose' is when you have misplaced something. 'Loose' is when bindings or knots ar not tight.

YOU CAN NOT USE THESE TERMS INTERCHANGEABLY!

And when people say "Me and him are going out." It's "He and I". The other person(s) go first. Subject case, not object case.

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You mean like a sign in Food Lion (yes! let's name names!!!) saying
"Banana's 58¢/lb."?


Yes, yes yes!!! Like the very elegant restaurant in Charleston with a beautifully lettered chalkboard out front advertising "Our Dinner Special's"

And the manicure place down the street from me with a huge sign across the facade, "BEST NAIL'S"

And the medical clinic a few blocks away that claims, "Walk-in's Welcome"

Grrr...

Signs are expensive. Is it too much to ask that professional sign makers be educated enough in basic English to save their customers from looking like idiots?

I blame computers for the Apostrophe Catastrophe. Way too many folks depend on spell check instead of common sense (cents). No software program can read your mind! Do you mean cent or scent? There, their or they're?

Boy is it fun to rant :-)

Cheers,

Jeanie
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Signs are expensive. Is it too much to ask that professional sign makers be educated enough in basic English to save their customers from looking like idiots?

It's possible that the person who commissioned the sign rejected the signmaker's editing. When I was a kid, I sold greeting cards door to door (no, Dwalin, you may not). Some were imprinted with stuff like "Nancy, Al, and the kids" -- you know, Christmas cards and the like. My customers wanted "The Zerbe's" on theirs. Even as a preteen, I knew that it should be "The Zerbes" and I told the customer so -- but the customer decided that she liked the apostrophe. Okay. She had a right to have her cards imprinted the way she wanted. It hurt, though!

phantomdiver
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My customers wanted "The Zerbe's" on theirs. Even as a preteen, I knew that it should be "The Zerbes" and I told the customer so -- but the customer decided that she liked the apostrophe.


Whenever I see families (not family's) do that, I always want to ask, "The Zerbe's what?"



Jeanie ;-)
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One reason a lot of people confuse "its" and "it's" is that many words form the possessive by adding an apostrophe, such as "John's hat" "my sister's house," "the clerk's shirt," etc.

So rather than read "it's" as a contraction, they see it as a possessive, even though other possessive pronouns don't have an apostrophe, either.

My favorite variation on the "its/it's" dilemma is "its'." Since "it" is never plural, I have no idea where that one comes from.

ab
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Hi,

I just found this board and I see that I am 93 posts behind. So my apologies if I am repeating a pet peeve.

Mine is "your" vs. "you're"

I was in a restaurant recently and the person in front of me had on a t-shirt which read, "Your standing behind a member of the class of 2002!"

I'm sure that must instill a lot of school pride. :)


ShelbyBoy
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Here's another.

In attempt to shorten "magazine advertisement" someone will write "magazine add" instead of "magazine ad"



ShelbyBoy
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