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Author: GunnarSK Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 22686  
Subject: Jedwabne remembered Date: 7/11/2004 4:47 PM
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Sunday afternoon prayers were read in Hebrew and Polish near the memorial for the Jews murdered in Jedwabne on 10 july 1941.

Among the participants were: David Peleg, Israel's ambassador in Poland, Warsaw and Lodz rabbi Michael Schudrich and Piotr Kadlcik, president of the Association of Jewish Religious Communities in Poland. There were also representatives of the Jewish community in Warsaw and individual participants. No inhabitants of Jedwabne or official representatives of the town, who have also been absent from previous ceremonies at the memorial, most notably its inauguration in 2001. Representatives of the Podlaski Regional Council with chairman Zbigniew Krzywicki and a delegation from the National Memorial Institute with historian dr. Jerzy Milewski laid down flowers by the memorial.

Rabbi Schudrich said to the participants, that the most important thing in Jedwabne is prayer, and continued "We are here to remember and pray together. Most important is prayer to God without big words, that such a tragedy may never happen again."

The participants continued to the nearby 19th century Jewish cemetary which also holds the common grave of the Jews murdered on 10 july 1941 to sing and read from the Psalms.

from: http://info.onet.pl/948597,11,item.html


As I remember it from my visit two years ago, the cemetary is overgrown with hazelnuts and shows little sign of maintenance except for the fairly recent stone raised to mark the common grave and its immediate surroundings. Many matsevas lie around, some of them half buried, and others probably underground, but there are no visible signs of recent major vandalism. A place forgotten by the town (exceptionally remembered by outsiders), a typical Jewish cemetary of rural Poland belonging to a community which is no longer.

Gunnar
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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3458 of 22686
Subject: Re: Jedwabne remembered Date: 7/11/2004 8:31 PM
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Many matsevas [gravestones] lie around, some of them half buried, and others probably underground, but there are no visible signs of recent major vandalism. A place forgotten by the town (exceptionally remembered by outsiders), a typical Jewish cemetary of rural Poland belonging to a community which is no longer.

About 10 years ago my Mother went with my aunt & uncle to visit the two towns in Poland that my Bubbe & Zayde came from. They told me Jewish cemeteries were overgrown with weeds, completely unmaintained. In the one where my great-grandparents are buried, there was a horse grazing among the gravestones.

They spent a week in Poland, and saw camps and graveyards, but very few living Jews. In the words of my uncle Floyd ZT"L, "Poland is the world's largest Jewish cemetery."

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