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Author: applefoot Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 756  
Subject: Just for Fun Date: 3/17/2003 12:57 PM
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Ok, word lovers,

Just for fun..... who knows a six letter English word that has two almost exact opposite meanings.

There may be more than one of course in which case I will have learned something too. <grin>

Jon
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Author: awwilliams One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 695 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/17/2003 5:35 PM
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Jon,

who knows a six letter English word that has two almost exact opposite meanings.

The answer is that, inter alia, I do. But you are probably looking for Cleave. If you expand to more than six letters, you can also use Sanction.

Andrew

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Author: applefoot Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 696 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/17/2003 8:40 PM
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Hi Andy

Well done ...... CLEAVE is indeed the word I was thinking of.

It is interesting that you brought up SANCTION because on reading that another immediately jumped up at me..... CITATION. Not sure that I find either of these as satisfying however.

I must admit to quite liking the verb CLEAVE though as it unambiguously means to split apart or to adhere.

Certainly hope we get some more.

Thanks

Jon

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Author: Latinus Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 699 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/23/2003 8:41 PM
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I thought that CLING means "to adhere". Bu cleave?

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Author: Latinus Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 700 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/23/2003 8:42 PM
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I left out a "t".
-
I thought that CLING means "to adhere". But cleave?

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Author: awwilliams One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 705 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/24/2003 10:18 AM
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Latinus,

FYI - Cleave can either mean to split/seperate, or to cling/adhere to. Basically, these definitions are opposites of each other.

http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=cleave

Andrew

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Author: microbee Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 706 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/24/2003 3:53 PM
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Latinus, think of the old-form wedding vows:

"... and cleave only unto him/her, as long as you both shall live?"

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Author: omadhaun Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 707 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/24/2003 7:17 PM
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FYI - Cleave can either mean to split/seperate, or to cling/adhere to. Basically, these definitions are opposites of each other


They are often referred to as Janus words.

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Author: mapletree7 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 740 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 3/31/2005 10:25 AM
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Ok, word lovers,

Just for fun..... who knows a six letter English word that has two almost exact opposite meanings.

There may be more than one of course in which case I will have learned something too. <grin>

Jon


peruse?

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Author: jrr7 Big gold star, 5000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 741 of 756
Subject: Re: Just for Fun Date: 6/23/2006 12:19 PM
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I've always liked "raise/raze" except those are homonyms not the same word.

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