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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 1948  
Subject: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/23/2011 6:01 PM
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Hi, all! I need some advice from you more experienced parents. :-)

The Wombat started kindergarten this year. They are learning letters and numbers; he is reading and doing arithmetic. There are no pull-outs or enrichment, the teacher is...less than cooperative, and he is complaining about it. I have spoken to her several times but feel my concerns are being dismissed.

I would like to see him moved to the first grade as he can easily handle the work and is socially mature enough. To that end, I have an appointment with the principal Monday morning but I don't know how best to approach her with this. She is aware that I would like him moved but I have been told by my neighbor that "they NEVER move kids here."

What can I do to facilitate this? How do I word this so that we are all working for what's best for The Wombat? And please, no lectures about not pushing him because kindie is so wonderful; I get that from his teacher. I just got the butterfly poem in his folder today. <eyeroll>

Minxie
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Author: EngineerPaul Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1921 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/23/2011 7:22 PM
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There are an awful lot of options, depending on where you live and your circumstance. It would be fair to say that a vaguely similar situation is what started my family on the road to home schooling. That is a big lifestyle choice decision, but it can be pretty rewarding and allows you to keep the challenges appropriate to the child.

If the school you are in won't help when you talk to the principal, then you may want to consider what kinds of options you have to transfer to a different school. Many areas have some options to transfer within a district or to other districts. Those can be a headache, though, for transportation and for getting to know other families in your neighborhood. If you can find a school that provides enrichment programs for advanced students, you might find a grade bump to be unnecessary. Our district, for example, provides enrichment programs at only one of the local elementaries. Not sure why. Kids who qualify have to transfer there. Unfortunately, the programs start with second grade, so it wouldn't really help your situation... but then every area is different.

You can consider private school, if you have the money. Some private schools do a better job at challenging kids, although you have to do your homework carefully because that isn't necessarily true.

Finally, don't be discouraged by your neighbor. It may be that they NEVER have moved kids because they haven't found the right situation, or because they haven't run into a motivated parent. It might be that they NEVER do it because previous staff opposed it and those staff members have moved elsewhere. Or perhaps they merely NEVER do it that your neighbor is aware of. Going in with an open mind helps.

If nothing works, though, keep in mind that you can always challenge your child by supplemental teaching at home. Opportunities outside of school can be a lifeline during those years when in-school isn't doing the trick. Of course, that kind of attitude can suck a person into homeschooling if they aren't careful. ;)

My 2 cents.

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Author: determinedmom Big red star, 1000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1922 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/24/2011 6:54 PM
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There are a lot of ways to skin a cat.

First, try to find a mailing list/forum for GT issues for your locale. It is a good way to find others who may know about your situation. Alternatively (or even additionally) join one of the large mailing lists (if you aren't already there) like gt-families or Tagfam since you may find people there familiar with your district.

My son skipped 2nd grade (currently in college -- started at 16) so I can give a few comments from my experience and those of others I've known:

1. Is there any state law or regulation that addresses acceleration? In my state there is. Check your state education board website or call someone and ask.

2. Does your district have a policy on acceleration? Bear in mind that sometimes individual campuses don't even know the district policy. Check the district website and call someone and ask.

3. There is often discretion that can be invoked for acceleration. The official policy for acceleration in elementary school here was to take end of course exams in reading, math, social studies and science and score 90% on each one. However, the school principal had discretion to accelerate below that. My son took the tests and did very well on the reading/math but under 90% on social studies and science since those were specific content driven. The school accelerated him anyway.

4. There are many kinds of acceleration. Whole grade acceleration can work really well for many kids. However, sometimes it isn't enough by itself or the kid may be really advanced in some ways and not others. In that case, subject acceleration can work. After my son skipped 2nd grade, he was still advanced in math and mid-year was subject accelerated to 4th grade math. He ultimately ended up having several more math accelerations. These can get tricky though when you have a child who is in one school for some subjects and needs to go to the higher level school for some subjects.

5. Sometimes if the public school won't accelerate you can accelerate through a private school enrollment or an online public school enrollment and accelerate there and then come back at the higher level. However, before doing this check carefully to see if the public school is required to accept the acceleration in the other school. This can be state specific as well.

6. Private school can be an option for the long term as well. Private schools, however, vary a lot in how willing they are too accelerate. Even some GT schools refuse to do it.

In general -- in approaching the principal we stressed adequate challenge. We did not talk about him being bored since that usually doesn't go over well. My experience is that most teachers/administrators will focus on social issues so be prepared for that.

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1923 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 9:02 AM
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Thank you for your advice! I wish I could homeschool him and keep returning to that alternative trying to figure out a way but he likes to eat so I have to work. I do provide alternate work at home for him; we solve math problems in the car or spell or make up silly songs. He often reads out loud to me in the car as well and then he reads me a bedtime story. :-)

I am looking at the interdistrict option and found out that the next school district over is a much better choice for us overall. They have a G&T program and an active enrichment program plus the high school has a gymnastics team which may serve him well.

Unfortunately, I cannot afford the private schools here and their schedules are also not amenable to my work schedule. Without before and after care, I couldn't swing it; they don't provide it so I would have to hire someone which I couldn't afford since I already can't afford the school. :-(

Yeah, my neighbor...she is not giving me the best advice regarding him anyway. They have a vo-tech school here that is very good but...it's vo-tech; they have a specific focus on trade skills. I am not against trade skills; that's what I have courtesy of the military. The Wombat, however, wants to study mechanical engineering and build robots (for now, anyway :-) he's five) so trade skills are not for him. Math and science are his forte.

Thanks for the support. I am hopeful they will welcome the opportunity to challenge him but am aware that they may not. :-(

Minxie

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1924 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 9:11 AM
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1. Is there any state law or regulation that addresses acceleration? In my state there is. Check your state education board website or call someone and ask.

I have researched the state laws online and haven't found any yet. I have also found that MA is not known for their gifted programs. :-(

2. Does your district have a policy on acceleration? Bear in mind that sometimes individual campuses don't even know the district policy. Check the district website and call someone and ask.

I do not know but will call and ask.

3. There is often discretion that can be invoked for acceleration. The official policy for acceleration in elementary school here was to take end of course exams in reading, math, social studies and science and score 90% on each one. However, the school principal had discretion to accelerate below that. My son took the tests and did very well on the reading/math but under 90% on social studies and science since those were specific content driven. The school accelerated him anyway.

I would be okay with him testing but am not offering it unless there is a definite problem due to the cost. First I want to find out if they will accelerate him or not.

4. There are many kinds of acceleration. Whole grade acceleration can work really well for many kids. However, sometimes it isn't enough by itself or the kid may be really advanced in some ways and not others. In that case, subject acceleration can work. After my son skipped 2nd grade, he was still advanced in math and mid-year was subject accelerated to 4th grade math. He ultimately ended up having several more math accelerations. These can get tricky though when you have a child who is in one school for some subjects and needs to go to the higher level school for some subjects.

Hmmm...I will have to consider that. I was just bumped from kindie to first and then later from 5th to 6th so don't have any experience with individual subject acceleration. Thanks for the tip.

5. Sometimes if the public school won't accelerate you can accelerate through a private school enrollment or an online public school enrollment and accelerate there and then come back at the higher level. However, before doing this check carefully to see if the public school is required to accept the acceleration in the other school. This can be state specific as well.

6. Private school can be an option for the long term as well. Private schools, however, vary a lot in how willing they are too accelerate. Even some GT schools refuse to do it.


Unfortunately, private school is really not an option for us at this time due to the cost. I am looking at changing districts though so that might work.


In general -- in approaching the principal we stressed adequate challenge. We did not talk about him being bored since that usually doesn't go over well. My experience is that most teachers/administrators will focus on social issues so be prepared for that.

Thanks, that is what I did not know how to say; "adequate challenge". I talked to his teacher about him being bored and she told me he doesn't know all his letter sounds. Really?!?! He is reading and comprehending material far beyond his years so I'm pretty sure he knows them or doesn't need them at this point. <chuckle> I think the "being bored" just put her on the defensive which was not my intention.

Minxie

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Author: reallyalldone Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1925 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 10:14 AM
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Here's my experience :
Two of my kids started school “early” – both kindergarten which was private and first which ended up being that way.(Long story short, K was still considered day care and pretaxed because of the school attendance laws in my state). The oldest and youngest missed the cut off by a few weeks. We(and their preschool teachers) knew they were ready to go and for social reasons, I didn’t want grades skipped so I worked on the early starts.

This is my oldest(a girl) and youngest(a boy). They are now almost 30 and as of today, 24. It was definitely the best choice for them and although we discussed skipping their senior years of h.s., each felt it would put them in too awkward a position in college. They each were able to pick up college credits and have a good time their senior years.

For my daughter, it was easier to continue to be smart and she choose to go into AFROTC in college. I’m not sure it would have been possible if she had been any younger.

For my son, I still barely felt that I got him out of high school without any behavior problems and he took enough credits with him to college to finish that early if he had wanted. Instead, he used it to negotiate with me for a semester at the University of Auckland. There were a couple of downsides for him. He was in marketing and was only 20 the summer after his junior year in college. This is when most students did internships and he was at a huge disadvantage because he was not 21.

The other possible disadvantage would have been in h.s. sports. I really only need to look at photos of him his senior year in h.s. and the following year to see the difference. He played h.s. lacrosse and was pretty good but the one year made a big difference in his body. In college, he took up rowing(mostly because girls were involved) and was pretty good. He also played club lacrosse the last year and a half of college and I could definitely see the difference there. I don’t think he cared and we weren’t looking for athletic scholarships – he ended up with merit money anyway. It’s just another piece to think about.

Both kids never said much about their ages. It was apparent in drivers license time and legal drinking time.

Both completed college in 4 years and both are doing well now. On the social side, my son has always dated girls at least a year and usually 2 years older(even as a h.s. freshman). In talking to my daughter about it somewhat recently, she felt that she ended up with a good balance on the academic and social sides.

K-12 issues are so state specific that I would say that 2gifts might be your best resource on those.

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Author: ItsGoingUp Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1926 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 3:51 PM
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Take a look at Hoagies' Gifted (http://www.hoagiesgifted.org) for tons of good information. One critical issue is where you kid falls in the spectrum of giftedness. If it's anywhere within about three standard deviations of average, then you can work hard and/or get lucky and be sort of decently served by the schools as they exist. If it's four or more (e.g. see Davidson at http://www.davidsongifted.org/youngscholars), or your kid is twice exceptional (http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/twice_exceptional.htm), then pretty much forget it.

Finding a local mailing list or two that cover gifted education is probably the most use, as you can talk to experienced parents about state law, school districts and such. If you can formulate a clear goal, having an advocate can help.

One thing I've always heard from everybody doing this sort of thing: document everything. In detail. Take notes during any meetings. You are dealing with institutions whose only desire (as institutions) is to make problems disappear and keep the bureaucracy going. They are not your friends and they do not care about you or your kids. Individuals might care, but they typically have jobs in institutions, and if they advocate against the interests of the institutions then they don't keep those jobs for very long.

-IGU-

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1927 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 4:05 PM
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Both kids never said much about their ages. It was apparent in drivers license time and legal drinking time.

As a side note, my dad had to drive me to prom because my boyfriend didn't have a car and I didn't have a license. :-)


The other possible disadvantage would have been in h.s. sports. I really only need to look at photos of him his senior year in h.s. and the following year to see the difference. He played h.s. lacrosse and was pretty good but the one year made a big difference in his body. In college, he took up rowing(mostly because girls were involved) and was pretty good. He also played club lacrosse the last year and a half of college and I could definitely see the difference there. I don’t think he cared and we weren’t looking for athletic scholarships – he ended up with merit money anyway. It’s just another piece to think about.


I have given this a fair bit of consideration also as I think it is probably more important to boys than girls (the size difference and all). Right now he is in the 97th percentile for height and weight, and he has two older brothers who matured early, so it should be okay. Thanks for the advice, though; I'm trying to cover all the bases and feel like I'm working the high wire without a net or training.

Minxie

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1928 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 4:07 PM
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Thank you! It shouldn't be this difficult but at least there are options available to us.

Minxie

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1929 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 4:09 PM
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Also I do not believe he is four deviations or more but three is certainly well within the realm of possibility. He has not presented with any learning difficulties as yet.

Minxie

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Author: determinedmom Big red star, 1000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1930 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/25/2011 7:35 PM
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Looking back on we had a mixed experience with acceleration.

The first acceleration was to skip 2nd grade and that went really well. My son fit in well with his 3rd grade class and the age difference was just a non-event. He also subject accelerated in math. He is 2E (he is dysgraphic with ADHD) and ultimately we did send him to a private school, for the ADHD issues not the GT issues (the public school had handled the gifted end of things well). We weren't worried about the high school sports issues since he was very non-athletic at least for anything that was organized school sports. (He ended up doing karate and is a black belt, but like many things he has done his class is mixed age and what grade he is in doesn't matter).

He ended up having a fairly non-traditional school experience with doing a combination of public school, private therapeutic school, private non-therapeutic school which used a public distance learning program.

People always wonder about the social issues. My son was actually shorter for his age and was always very thin (he is still around the 5th percentile in weight). The social issues do exist and were probably the most difficult when he was, say, 14 and a junior in high school. It was a small private school and classes were mixed age but I think he felt that he stuck out as being different.

However, he also said that he wouldn't want to have not been accelerated either. So the age difference making him feel like he was different was a negative for him but not such a big one that he would have wanted to do anything different.

He started community college at 16 and immediately felt at home in that environment. He feels that the social issues entirely went away and that no one cares about his age. (We felt he was not old enough to go away to college at 16 so started him at community college for a couple of years which has gone really well).

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Author: inparadise Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1931 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/26/2011 7:33 AM
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I have been told by my neighbor that "they NEVER move (up) kids here."

I hear that often, when people find out how old the boys are relative to their grade. I'm surprised at how often "never" happens.

MA is tough, based on my sister's admittedly very dated experience with my nephew. They wound up putting both their kids into a very prestigious private school at a greatly reduced cost. Don't assume you can not afford it. These schools have money, and are looking for highly qualified scholarship candidates.

One thing that worked well for Youngest in 2nd grade was being allowed to go to the computer for educational programs when he finished his work early. Sometimes she would pre-test him, and excuse him even from the instructional period. That was after already being accelerated a grade, so that is no magic bullet. If there is not a classroom computer, perhaps you could provide a laptop for him?

Good luck. It's a noble fight.

IP

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1932 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/26/2011 7:46 PM
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Thanks. I had the meeting today and the principal is amenable to pulling him out to first-grade reading and math but the teacher is NOT. She is adamantly opposed to it because his handwriting is not as refined as other children and because he still draws stick people. He also has trouble with the directions apparently. I think it is more of a perception issue as she told him to draw his name in colors; he drew his name in yellow and colored around it in red where other children drew the letters in different colors.

Admittedly his work is not the neatest and I knew that going in. The teacher said that when he finishes working, she lets him get a book to sit by himself and read but he wants to keep working with his friends. In her eyes, it means he's not ready for a pull-out; in mine, it means he needs a more appropriate academic peer group. There was a whole lot of Wombat-bashing going on in today's meeting, and I tried hard not to be defensive with regard to it.

Most of his issues center around classroom etiquette and not knowing this "Everyday Math" program and verbiage. She asked him to write a "number sentence" for example; when she said this, I asked her what a "number sentence" was. Apparently, it's an equation so I asked her if she asked him to write an equation. I feel like it's setting him up for failure to learn these terms that will only apply here and don't mean anything to the rest of the world.

So...venting aside, today I looked at a Montessori program that is relatively close. The cost is insane and I will have to hire someone to drop him off at school but there's a woman I know who is in a similar situation and she said her nanny might be able to do it. At a minimum, The Wombat wants a different teacher; the best part of his day is aftercare and he used to LOVE school.

Minxie

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Author: inparadise Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1933 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/26/2011 8:24 PM
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So...venting aside, today I looked at a Montessori program that is relatively close.

Our guys did Montessori from the age of two through first grade, the max for the school. It was fabulous. Not all Montessori schools are created equal though. That was the last school I was truly satisfied with until now that they are both in high school.

IP

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Author: determinedmom Big red star, 1000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1934 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 1:50 AM
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She is adamantly opposed to it because his handwriting is not as refined as other children and because he still draws stick people. He also has trouble with the directions apparently. I think it is more of a perception issue as she told him to draw his name in colors;

Sigh. If my son's school had gone by that kind of standard, he would still be in kindergarten. He had intractable problems with handwriting (he is dysgraphic) and there were those who felt that this kind of thing not only disqualified him from acceleration, it disqualified him from the GT program. When my son was a 9 year old 6th grader (who nonetheless had difficulty with handwriting), his social studies teacher felt he didn't belong in the GT course -- in fact should be in resource social studies instead of on level -- solely because he couldn't color neatly within the lines and was allowed to type his work. She even told me that his mind could keep up and academically he could make an A in her class but didn't belong in anything above resource since he couldn't handwrite well.... Thankfully, the administration didn't agree. (He never did learn how to handwrite very well despite occupational therpay and in college still types his work most of the time, but if left to her he would presumably be languishing in resource high school courses instead of college courses)

It is very hard to get a teacher like the one you describe to change their views. I'm not saying it is impossible but sure not likely.

Will the principal go ahead and do the pullout? Sometimes what works is to suggest it as a trial. Usually all the fears of problems evaporate during the trial but that way the teacher doesn't feel her input was ignored.

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Author: tconi Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1935 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 2:28 AM
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because he still draws stick people.

in the margins & stuff?

the elf (11 and 7th grade) and the boy (21 - college senior) both still do this


peace & what else are they going to do when they are finished with the work?
t





ps. check out sfdt.com for some graphic stick figure violence

pps. xkcd is nothing but stick figures and absolute brilliance

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Author: inparadise Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1936 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 8:52 AM
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I saw from your profile that you are on Cape. It's ironic, but the more expensive a school you apply to, the higher the chance they will give you a significant break on the tuition if they believe your child will help their image. The following link is to an article on private schools on the Cape that while dated, may be of interest: http://www.capecodtoday.com/blogs/index.php/2009/05/04/cape-...

Montessori is great, but the schools don't tend to be big enough or well enough funded to give a decent break on tuition. Have you looked at Cape Cod Academy? This is the level of school, similar to paying for college, that Sis got her kids to attend for almost free, albeit when they were in high school, not elementary school. Sometimes the best value has the biggest retail price tag, because those paying retail subsidize your deep discount price.

IP

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Author: EngineerPaul Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1937 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 1:25 PM
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"She is adamantly opposed to it because his handwriting is not as refined as other children and because he still draws stick people."

If it is any consolation, my handwriting didn't really reach par until I took a drafting class in high school and I still managed to do just fine. It is good for a teacher to be aware of these things as potential signs of challenges, but micro-managing kids does them no favors. Different kids hit different stages at different times and some kids have different strengths.

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Author: GardenStateFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1938 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 2:11 PM
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Most of his issues center around classroom etiquette and not knowing this "Everyday Math" program and verbiage. She asked him to write a "number sentence" for example; when she said this, I asked her what a "number sentence" was. Apparently, it's an equation so I asked her if she asked him to write an equation. I feel like it's setting him up for failure to learn these terms that will only apply here and don't mean anything to the rest of the world.

So...venting aside, today I looked at a Montessori program that is relatively close. The cost is insane and I will have to hire someone to drop him off at school but there's a woman I know who is in a similar situation and she said her nanny might be able to do it. At a minimum, The Wombat wants a different teacher; the best part of his day is aftercare and he used to LOVE school.


This is what happened with DS1, he used to adore school when he was in kindergarten (where they had a much more Montessori-like environment) and loathed first grade. I only figured it out later, when I had him tested.

Everyday Math is AWFUL. Just horrific. They stopped using it in our district, thankfully, after they found out that something like 60% of the people who graduated high school with that curriculum required remedial math in college.

It's terrible, and it's frustrating!!!

Also, the handwriting thing... I have horrible handwriting (but I type like a demon), both my DS's have horrible handwriting, and that's just kind of the way it is.

But if he's bored, keep advocating for him - you know your child, and what's going to be right for him!

GSF

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Author: TheEvilDrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1939 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 8:10 PM
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Thank you all so very much for sharing your stories; it helps me a great deal.

No, not in the margins, tconi; he just draws stick peeps and they want him to "add detail". The problem is that at almost forty, I still draw stick peeps. I don't see a problem with it but then, I love xkcd, too! :-) I sent in maze books for him to work when he's finished with his work but those were sent home and he was not allowed to use them. OF COURSE, that meant I had to stop in and see the principal on the way out...sigh...

Thank heavens that someone else has issues with the Everyday Math curriculum. The teacher swears it's the best thing since sliced bread; my friend reminded me she has to drink the Kool-Aid but I'm not buying it. Math based on estimation and using a completely different set of terms? Hmmm...

I believe she is setting him up for failure by testing him on stuff he couldn't possibly know and then declaring that he's not ready for first grade. We have an appointment with a Montessori school tomorrow and the teacher was DELIGHTED to hear some of the examples of his thinking. The only problem there is that her school only goes through kindergarten so he would have to move elsewhere for first grade. There are several other options open to us and I am trying to explore them all.

I looked at Cape Cod Academy but dismissed it due to the cost. I will revisit it; thanks for the recommendation. I don't know what the cutoffs are for financial aid but with just me and him, I always feel like they will say I should be able to afford it on my salary.

Again, I want to say thank you to all of you. It helps me so much knowing people who've been through this and hearing all of your advice and stories.

Minxie

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Author: inparadise Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 1940 of 1948
Subject: Re: Kindie to first grade Date: 9/27/2011 8:34 PM
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I looked at Cape Cod Academy but dismissed it due to the cost. I will revisit it; thanks for the recommendation. I don't know what the cutoffs are for financial aid but with just me and him, I always feel like they will say I should be able to afford it on my salary.

Eh. What do you have to lose by checking it out and applying.

IP

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