No. of Recommendations: 1
http://www.tmz.com/2011/03/19/knut-dies-polar-bear-peta-germ...

Knut passed away in his habitat this morning of still-to-be determined causes at the age of 4. A rep for PETA tells TMZ they contacted to Berlin Zoo months ago to alert them to the fact that Knut was being "terrorized" by three female polar bears -- including his own mother!

The rep tells us, "PETA Germany repeatedly asked zoo authorities to move Knut away from the three females to a different location. His premature death could possibly have been avoided. Polar bears don't belong in captivity."

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intercst
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No. of Recommendations: 4
"Knut passed away in his habitat this morning of still-to-be determined causes at the age of 4. A rep for PETA tells TMZ they contacted to Berlin Zoo months ago to alert them to the fact that Knut was being "terrorized" by three female polar bears -- including his own mother! The rep tells us, "PETA Germany repeatedly asked zoo authorities to move Knut away from the three females to a different location. His premature death could possibly have been avoided. Polar bears don't belong in captivity." </snip> intercst
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Polar bears are not under normal conditions social animals. They come together for breeding and then drift apart after mating is done. In the their natural wild state Polar bears live isolated nomadic lives searching the ice for seals, whales, etc. to prey upon.

When they do accidentally come together their is oftentimes fighting to establish dominance and usually the larger more aggressive polar bear drives the smaller weaker one out.

I oftentimes hear people talk about rabbits or cats in captivity getting "lonely" because they "need" company. This is so bizarre to me because some animals are evolutionarily adapted to living non-social lives and in their natural state they do not socialize with one another. The only member of the cat family that even comes close to being social are Lions and since it is a relatively new adaptation they don't do it very well with lots of fighting, snarling, and aggression going on. The Lionesses are usually sisters and closely related to one another but they barely tolerate each other - and then only because they are more effective as a pride hunting large animals than alone.

So my point is that certain animals in their natural environment are evolutionarily adapted to living solitary lives and they do NOT get lonely and are better taken care of as single isolated individuals.

And by the way the house cats relationship with humans is more akin to a mother cat and kittens than like a social pack of dogs. Wild house cats do not live in groups under ideal or normal circumstances. They prefer to live alone and only tolerate one another when there is a large concentration of food available.

Artie
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