UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (10) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Author: workwayless Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 1481  
Subject: Lower dining-out costs Date: 10/31/2003 8:40 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
I like to eat out at restaurants--sometimes a little too much so that item is on my budget watch list. One thing I thinking about trying is a hosting a progressive dinner party with friends. Has anyone participated in that type of party?
Print the post Back To Top
Author: Blackduff Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 186 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/1/2003 12:53 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I did this for a about a year. We had done each month and the quality was quite good. The amount was trying to keep within a given price but that was hard.

I'm not sure why it finally stopped but it was a good evening. Maybe one problem was that some would drink too much. Each person was capable of doing a gourmet type of meal.

I was living in Sweden when I did this monthly meal. This was a "Gourmet Monthly" by many groups. It kept the cost was the main purpose but it was pretty fun.

Blackduff

Print the post Back To Top
Author: andrew61 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 187 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/1/2003 1:49 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
Has anyone participated in that type of party?


I have, but only once, and it was nearly ten years ago. Two friends and I did a progressive dinner for Thanksgiving one year -- one friend did soup and salad at his place, the other friend did the main course at his place, and I did dessert (pies) at my place. It worked out quite well, and was fun.

I like to eat out a lot, too -- usually my main meal of the day five to seven times per week, but I keep it cheap by going to low-cost restaurants (mostly ethnic -- Chinese, Thai, Italian, Mexican, etc.) that are also good quality, and taking advantage of their lunch specials in the middle of the afternoon. I don't cook at all, but if I did, I figure that after I bought all the ingredients, it would cost me more to prepare the same types of meals myself at home than it does to dine out, especially since I'm single and would be cooking for one, which I reckon is less cost-effective than cooking for two or for a family.



Print the post Back To Top
Author: sumap10 Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 188 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/1/2003 7:23 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I figure that after I bought all the ingredients, it would cost me more to prepare the same types of meals myself at home than it does to dine out, especially since I'm single and would be cooking for one, which I reckon is less cost-effective than cooking for two or for a family.

I hear people say this all the time, but I spend around $100/month for what I call groceries, which includes papergoods, occasional wine, etc.
How could you possibly eat 3 meals a day, plus snacks (can't live w/o chocolate), on $3 a day. I always think it's a rationalization for those who don't want to cook (and yea, I'm in that group), but maybe I'm wrong. Please explain. Also, eating out is usually salty, which I have to watch, and I'm in my 50's so I don't eat like a horse like I used to. I don't eat any prepared food, but I'm heavy on veggies and fruits. Of course, I've never been that crazy about eating out unless it's gourmet. Even those times I've had to live on expense accounts, I would usually order a series of appetizers for a little more variety than a plate of steak with a tablespoon of overcooked veggies, and a huge baked potato.

I must not eat like most people and am curious about other's diets.

Sumap10

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chooey98 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 189 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/1/2003 11:36 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3
Many people say it's not economical to cook for one. I've never believed this. Hasn't anyone heard of a freezer? When I was single, I'd make big batches of stuff... chili, spaghetti sauce, beans & wieners, and even fresh veggies that I had lightly steamed, ate what I wanted for that evening, put the rest in small-sized individual freezer containers, and froze them. Most apartments come with a refrigerator with a freezer compartment, and you'd be surprised what you can squeeze in there!

Print the post Back To Top
Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 190 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/2/2003 2:15 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
I like to eat out at restaurants--sometimes a little too much so that item is on my budget watch list. One thing I thinking about trying is a hosting a progressive dinner party with friends. Has anyone participated in that type of party? - workwayless

My wife and I used to belong to an "International Dinners Group." It was a special interest group in the UT Women's Faculty Club which my wife belongs to. Each month we'd go to a different person's house and have dinner. Each guest would bring a dish, normally assigned to them by the hostess whose house we were eating at that month. The different months had themes like Spanish, Greek, Italian, Chinese, Mexican, German, French, Australian, Russian, etc. It was fun, but my wife was so busy with work and other priorities that we aren't doing it this year. I suppose that people could set something similiar up friends or co-workers. We only met once a month on a Friday or Saturday night. One couple would bring appetizers, another a vegetable, another a starch/casserole, or some such, meat, dessert, etc. It really worked well. The internet has a plethora of recipes on it about just about any cuisine a person could imagine. You could make it as fancy or casual as you wanted also. - Art

Print the post Back To Top
Author: InLivingColor Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 191 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/3/2003 12:59 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3
I always think it's a rationalization for those who don't want to cook (and yea, I'm in that group), but maybe I'm wrong.

Dunno about the OP. For me it was more cost-effective to eat out for reasons such as:
1. I am clumsy in almost every area away from a keyboard
2. Recipes always seem to call for a dash of some spice I might never use again, and as an ignoramus in the kitchen I was always afraid that would be the ONE ingredient which "makes the meal" ... so I always felt like I should have a full array of stuff I've never heard of and never know if I'm going to use again
3. Clean up!
4. Investment in cooking utensils, appliances, and all that other stuff
5. Time spent learning how to cook
6. Hassles involved in moving all the kitchen equipment every time I moved
If you want to call that rationalizations for not wanting to cook, I would not take offense. But I would also note that one year (in another decade, when food prices were lower than they are now) I went from spending about $100/month feeding myself by eating out all the time, and the next year my housemate was spending $300/month to cook for both of us.

These days I eat almost all my meals at home. Am also nowhere near the carnivore I used to be, so even with higher food prices I'm spending less now than I was then. Over the years, most restaurant food tastes more and more like plastic (or cardboard) to me. But yeah, for a number of years, every time I sat down to figure what it would take for me to cook for myself, it came out to way more $$$ than I was spending at the time.
ILC

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: kimflournoy Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 192 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/3/2003 11:06 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
2. Recipes always seem to call for a dash of some spice I might never use again, and as an ignoramus in the kitchen I was always afraid that would be the ONE ingredient which "makes the meal" ... so I always felt like I should have a full array of stuff I've never heard of and never know if I'm going to use again

FYI, there are a number of places where you can buy bulk spices, so if you just need 1 tsp you don't have to buy a 4oz jar. Whole Foods is one store that's national, but many natural foods stores have bulk spice bins. It makes a big difference, not only in Quicken but also for trying new recipes (as you saw).

Print the post Back To Top
Author: holzgrafe Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 193 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/3/2003 9:27 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3
I went from spending about $100/month feeding myself by eating out all the time, and the next year my housemate was spending $300/month to cook for both of us.

Yeah, but I'll bet your housemate was cooking fancier than your restaurants were; $3/day doesn't buy you much in any of the restaurants I've ever seen, even the ethnic ones. Moreover, if you cook the same sort of bulk, generic food that ethnic restaurants tend to offer, you can do it at home for significantly less than $3/day. That assumes, of course, that you cook it in larger quantities (as the restaurants do) and freeze the extra, as a previous poster pointed out.

Most recipes make between 4 and 8 servings. You can cook three or four dishes on a weekend, to provide bulk, minimize labor overhead and offer variety, and then eat nicely for several weeks on the results.

As far as herbs and spices are concerned, don't worry about buying a "full array"; just buy whatever is called for in the recipe you plan to make. (Read the recipes before you go shopping and make a list.) You will only use a tiny bit of each, but then you'll have them available for the next time you make the same or a similar dish. Pretty soon you'll have an herb and spice collection that matches the recipes you like to cook, with no unneeded varieties and a relatively small fiscal outlay, spread over time.

Regards,
holzgrafe

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: DorothyM Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 194 of 1481
Subject: Re: Lower dining-out costs Date: 11/4/2003 9:13 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
These days I eat almost all my meals at home. Am also nowhere near the carnivore I used to be, so even with higher food prices I'm spending less now than I was then. Over the years, most restaurant food tastes more and more like plastic (or cardboard) to me. But yeah, for a number of years, every time I sat down to figure what it would take for me to cook for myself, it came out to way more $$$ than I was spending at the time.


I rarely go to restaurants as it seems I've become much too critical about the quality of food and the quality of service -- not to mention price. I'm not interested in going out for lunch/dinner/brunch just for the sake of going out but I might grab a piece of pizza or some such street food as I do errands, and I eat each day in my company cafeteria. I'm a vegetarian and it really bothers me to pay the same for pasta and a bit of sauce (or a soggy baked potato) and a poorly cooked vegetable as my companion is paying for a slab of meat and a vegetable.

I've gone (without ever thinking about it) from cooking fancy multi-course meals with aperitifs, wine and brandy to meeting friends for coffee or tea or a concert or a walk around a museum or just a walk.



Print the post Back To Top
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (10) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Advertisement