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Author: rathbateman Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 741923  
Subject: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 12:17 PM
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Let's say a $1 million investment nest egg is equal to an annual income of $40,000. Suddenly, $1 million doesn't seem so rich. That relationship can be turned around: if you have an annual pension of $40,000, you are effectively a millionaire, especially if that pension is adjusted for cost of livin

http://www.americanthinker.com/2012/12/millionaires_billiona...
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Author: ascenzm Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659393 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 12:29 PM
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Good article. I especially loved this part:

"This second course description is taken from the University of Missouri St. Louis bulletin. It describes a graduate level course in the Education school.

The Educational Role of Play: Emphasizes play as a constructive process with applications to cognitive and social development. Special attention to facilitating play in early childhood classrooms."

What a joke!

The public sees these public educators that sport advanced degrees and automatically thinks that they're smarter than everyone else.

Mike

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Author: wolverine307 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659394 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 12:31 PM
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The public sees these public educators that sport advanced degrees and automatically thinks that they're smarter than everyone else

Four of my siblings have a Master's in Education. I know better. Plus, I've spoken with their educator friends.

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Author: CCinOC Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659407 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 1:39 PM
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Mike wrote: The public sees these public educators that sport advanced degrees and automatically thinks that they're smarter than everyone else.

Ain't it the truth! I've seen these blowhards on other discussion boards. They don't even know how to write in plain English.

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659423 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 2:36 PM
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The public sees these public educators that sport advanced degrees and automatically thinks that they're smarter than everyone else.

Mike


Ha. I'll match your BA in engineering or my BA in computer science with any education doctorate in the country. It is a joke.

I worked my a$$ off to get my technical degree. Even though science/math/logic came fairly easy to me, (easier than spelling and grammar as my RECF board member will attest to <g>), it was still a lot of blood, sweat and tears between my Freshman orientation and the day I walked across the stage for my diploma.

decath

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659428 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 2:45 PM
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That is a good article. I was talking about this exact thing with my DW a few months ago.

Is a pension considered more honorable than a 401k account that can provide the same amount?

Related to this is the fact that most of us in the private sector do not have the option of a pension. It's 401k, IRA or just straight taxable investments. I certainly have no problem with that, as long as the gov't keeps it's greedy hands off of it.

But you can see a possible 'bad' ending to all this.

- First they get rid of pensions
- Replace with 401ks and IRA's giving people sole responsibility for their own retirement funding except perhaps a paltry 1-5% match by their company, if they are lucky
- many foolish people don't participate.
- the gov't, run by leftwing Nazi's, cry foul that some saved and some didn't
- the gov't consfiscates the savers $ for the benefit of the nonsavers


What the gov't fails to see as that most of the 'unsavers' blew their $ on trains, planes and automobiles while the rest of use where bringing our lunch to work so we could put in 10% or more into investments/savings.

Like I said bad ending....civil war.....blood in the streets....

decath

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659440 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 3:15 PM
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"The Educational Role of Play: Emphasizes play as a constructive process with applications to cognitive and social development. Special attention to facilitating play in early childhood classrooms."
What a joke! The public sees these public educators that sport advanced degrees and automatically thinks that they're smarter than everyone else." - Mike

------------------


When you are building a doghouse you learn about measurements, angles, materials science, woods, tools, etc.

When you bake a cake you learn about measurements, temperatures, thermostats, a little bit of chemistry, fractions, etc.

Throughout the 150,000 to 200,000 year human history most learning was done holistically. Children learned how to survive by "play" which was essentially emulating their parents behaviour while they went about being children.

What it means to learn holistically is that just while you go about living your daily life you are learning all the time. The lessons are embedded in our daily life and while we do our jobs, or play, we are learning.

I probably learned a whole lot more about Animal Science and animals while I was working than I did in my 4 formal years of being an Animal Science major at the University of Georgia. I learned while I was doing.

In fact that is what apprenticeship programs are all about. Learning while you are doing. Some youngsters would be better served taking them out of the classroom and putting them in apprenticeship programs where they could learn a skill or trade - without being locked up in a classroom and sitting in a seat.

Art

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659443 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 3:19 PM
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"Four of my siblings have a Master's in Education. I know better. Plus, I've spoken with their educator friends." - wolverine


I have 30 graduate semester hours towards a Masters Degree in Holistic Teaching and Learning. I had a 3.64 average when I left the program. That is after making up for failing a graduate statistics course and making a C in a graduate course in Agriculture Economics. I made straight A's in all the Education courses. They were fun and entertaining.

Unfortunately when I actually got in the classroom I found out I couldn't teach my way out of a paper bag. I could make A's in all the coursework but I was a horrible teacher. Strange but true.

Art

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Author: wolverine307 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659448 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 3:26 PM
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Unfortunately when I actually got in the classroom I found out I couldn't teach my way out of a paper bag. I could make A's in all the coursework but I was a horrible teacher. Strange but true.

According to my siblings, it's an art. The Art of Sales. You have to find a way to engage the kids in a way that makes learning fun and relevant.

Unfortunately, it doesn't work out that way due to the rules. My sister in OK teaches social studies and OK history. She was having success in keeping the kids engaged and motivated until the powers-that-be decided that she wasn't using the approved methods and forced her to stop doing what she was doing. She had to teach from the canned script.

The classes that used to trouble-free became rowdy as the JHS kids became bored and listless. And they acted out.

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Author: lowstudent Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659464 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 4:27 PM
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The public sees these public educators that sport advanced degrees and automatically thinks that they're smarter than everyone else.
_____________________________

I have a hard time believing they feel that way.

I guess in certain quarters, but anyone who knows folks that went into teaching? Well, they run the gamut from gifted to below average, but they all succeed in getting their 'advanced' degree, even those really not remotely smarter than the average dumb person.

it is also odd, that since teaching has moved to a requirement for more degrees, the public has gotten absolutely nothing from these better trained folks.

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Author: Gingko100 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659488 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 5:27 PM
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Like I said bad ending....civil war.....blood in the streets....
This is OTT hysterical. I know a certain percentage of our society is convinced The End Is Near, but this kind of apocalyptic speculation just gets in the way of sensible approach to living.

I think working and saving is better than not. You can do what you like. Don't work and don't save if you like. Me, I am saving lots as it will give me more options no matter what happens down the road. When and if something changes with those savings vehicles, I will adapt to that then. Meanwhile I have plenty to retire on. It does me no good in my day-to-day-life to see boogiemen behind every bush. I don't understand spending your whole life living in reactive fear. Life is too damn short for that nonsense.

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Author: ferjen Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659500 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 6:26 PM
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What the gov't fails to see as that most of the 'unsavers' blew their $ on trains, planes and automobiles while the rest of use where bringing our lunch to work so we could put in 10% or more into investments/savings.

Like I said bad ending....civil war.....blood in the streets....


It's a friggin' travesty that high schools don't require a mandatory class to teach kids how to manage their money for everything from balancing a checkbook to retirement savings.

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Author: lowstudent Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659503 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/11/2012 6:33 PM
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It's a friggin' travesty that high schools don't require a mandatory class to teach kids how to manage their money for everything from balancing a checkbook to retirement savings.
__________________________________-

LOL

That's simply not the shame of it at all. You seemed to have missed something-with all due respect

The kids couldn't do the math if they did teach the course.

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659618 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/12/2012 10:47 AM
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gingko
This is OTT hysterical. I know a certain percentage of our society is convinced The End Is Near, but this kind of apocalyptic speculation just gets in the way of sensible approach to living.

I think working and saving is better than not. You can do what you like. Don't work and don't save if you like. Me, I am saving lots as it will give me more options no matter what happens down the road. When and if something changes with those savings vehicles, I will adapt to that then. Meanwhile I have plenty to retire on. It does me no good in my day-to-day-life to see boogiemen behind every bush. I don't understand spending your whole life living in reactive fear. Life is too damn short for that nonsense.


Well, besides the few posts on this board, I don't exactly fret about it. I save, save, save as well....currently to the tune of about 30% of our combined income. I chip in another 6.5% of my income into an HSA account. I plan on retiring before I turn 60 without any income from any other source except my 401k, IRA and taxable investments.

OTT? Maybe. Hysterical. Not at all. I've worked and saved all my life and am darn close to being financially independent. This despite raising 3 kids with a SAHW most of our marriage on a slightly above average middle class income. I paid for my own college degree without any help from the gov't or family. I've never recieved one dime of economic out-patient care (see Millionair Next Door) from family. Same for DW.

so......

When democrat politicians start speculating on wealth confiscation from people like me, darn right I get a little defensive. Who wouldn't.

IMHO, anytime anybody in our currently 'free' society even suggests taking away the hard earned money of it's citizens to beef up failed government retirement programs.....they should be b!tch slapped big time.

I'm doing my job as a patriotic American. <g>

decath

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Author: 2828 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659623 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/12/2012 10:54 AM
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This is OTT hysterical. I know a certain percentage of our society is convinced The End Is Near, but this kind of apocalyptic speculation just gets in the way of sensible approach to living.

I think working and saving is better than not. You can do what you like. Don't work and don't save if you like. Me, I am saving lots as it will give me more options no matter what happens down the road. When and if something changes with those savings vehicles, I will adapt to that then. Meanwhile I have plenty to retire on. It does me no good in my day-to-day-life to see boogiemen behind every bush. I don't understand spending your whole life living in reactive fear. Life is too damn short for that nonsense.



Well, besides the few posts on this board, I don't exactly fret about it. I save, save, save as well....currently to the tune of about 30% of our combined income. I chip in another 6.5% of my income into an HSA account. I plan on retiring before I turn 60 without any income from any other source except my 401k, IRA and taxable investments.
-----------------------------------------------------------
I think it's pretty obvious from her post she really didn't read what you said, or at least she didn't comprehend it. All her replies to posts, if you get down to the brass tacks, are merely a vehicle to talk about herself. In this post she conveyed she has plenty of money to retire on. Did she mention she's a very successful business owner and doesn't care about tax rates? Did she mention she has muslim people in her family and they love jews and are nice?

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Author: feedmeNOWhuman Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659673 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/12/2012 12:34 PM
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I'll match your BA in engineering or my BA in computer science with any education doctorate in the country. It is a joke.



Technical degrees are tough, no doubt. I have a math degree myself.


But I'd like to see you beamed into a 7th grade classroom without any preparation and see how you do. You couldn't even figure out how to take attendance because they'll all be sitting in each others' seats.

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659698 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/12/2012 1:51 PM
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FMNH
But I'd like to see you beamed into a 7th grade classroom without any preparation and see how you do. You couldn't even figure out how to take attendance because they'll all be sitting in each others' seats.



You have an excellent point. But it does not take a doctor's degree to do that. My DW is not degree'd and she would not have a problem with it. She home schooled all 3 of my kids and spent about 7 years teaching Sunday school at an inner city church.

I could handle boys. Did enough of that with over a decade of youth coaching. Now the girls? They are scary. I can't look them in the eye and intimidate them like I can boys. <g>

decath

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659727 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/12/2012 3:41 PM
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"You have an excellent point. But it does not take a doctor's degree to do that. My DW is not degree'd and she would not have a problem with it. She home schooled all 3 of my kids and spent about 7 years teaching Sunday school at an inner city church. I could handle boys. Did enough of that with over a decade of youth coaching. Now the girls? They are scary. I can't look them in the eye and intimidate them like I can boys. <g>" - decath


Actualy decath I think you have a point. I think that people who have been parents probably make better teachers. They've learned how to be consistent and hang in there and not quit.

I on the other hand, childless, with a plethora of Education courses, both undergraduate and graduate, was a disaster at teaching. I was inconsistent and eventually just gave up. For me it was like going into battle. The kids never got tired of trying me. It was almost a game with them.

I'm fairly certain you would a much better teacher than me. By the way I had a double major in undergraduate school, B.S.A. and B.S.Ed and then while working at the University of Tennessee took and additional 30 Semester hours of graduate courses in Education to renew my teacher's certification. I have 45 undergraduate hours in Education from the Uni. of Georgia 30 Graduate hours from the University of Tennessee in Education.

I still think you'd make a better teacher. You wouldn't give up like I did.

Art

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Author: ascenzm Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659728 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/12/2012 3:44 PM
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It's a friggin' travesty that high schools don't require a mandatory class to teach kids how to manage their money for everything from balancing a checkbook to retirement savings.

ferjen


Why bother. The One is here. Obama will take care of them.

Mike

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Author: andrew61 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659912 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 5:35 PM
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I have 30 graduate semester hours towards a Masters Degree in Holistic Teaching and Learning. I had a 3.64 average when I left the program. That is after making up for failing a graduate statistics course and making a C in a graduate course in Agriculture Economics. I made straight A's in all the Education courses. They were fun and entertaining.

Unfortunately when I actually got in the classroom I found out I couldn't teach my way out of a paper bag. I could make A's in all the coursework but I was a horrible teacher. Strange but true.

Art



I remember that when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be a teacher when I grew up. In 9th grade Civics class we spent a week researching careers, and each student had to pick a career they might like, do some research and then give a brief presentation to the class on their chosen career. Then other students offered written anonymous feedback.

I remember one feedback I received: "Shouldn't be a teacher, not assertive enough." Boy, that really stung at the time, but I now realize the person was right. I am so glad I never went into teaching.

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Author: catmeyoo Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659919 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 7:13 PM
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I remember one feedback I received: "Shouldn't be a teacher, not assertive enough." Boy, that really stung at the time, but I now realize the person was right. I am so glad I never went into teaching. --andrew

I remember one feedback I received: "Shouldn't be a teacher, not assertive enough." Boy, that really stung at the time, but I now realize the person was right. I am so glad I never went into teaching. --andrew

Maybe I did well as a teacher, in terms of discipline, because I had a little storeroom my grandmother let me use as a clubhouse and I would gather all the younger kids in the neighborhood up, bring them in and we often played school, especially when it was raining or snowing out. I was always the teacher. I loved having a piece of chalk and writing on a blackboard, or wielding a long stick and waving it around at my students while telling them what to do. Count out loud to 100 by 7s. Use these 5 words I've written on the board in a sentence. They did it too, so I was used to being obeyed.

After college I started teaching high school. My first year (in Winnemucca, Nevada) I was teaching high school English and speech, directing the school plays and coaching the debate team, grading all those papers. I had 6 classes with an average of 35 kids per class. Grading the essays was what took so much time at night and on weekends. I had a red pencil with me all the time. I kind of liked it but I was only 22 the first year and I wanted to be in love and do things with friends and all those personal things and didn't have time.

The kids were typical high school kids--ready to turn into wildie little beasties if you took your eyes off them for one minute, and that was rather stressful too, especially at the beginning of the year when you were setting the tone and having to be extra tough. It was necessary to remain alert and to be sure you had a thoughtful lesson plan full of ways to keep them engaged and interested. Those lesson plans were usually what took up my weekends.

My second year of teaching was on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota--98% of the students were Sioux and that was much different. The students were quieter generally and discipline problems were few and far between for anyone. Many of the kids were bussed in to school where they remained for the week. I was girls' dormitory dean and even when my room and board girls were out of class and in the dorm at night they never gave me a moment's trouble.

Although it had been a pleasant experience, I left South Dakota after one year and moved to Denver again. I could have taught at that school for many years but I became friends with the high school principal's wife, who was the school librarian, and she had told me about library school and answered all my many questions and I decided that might be just for me. I went back to Denver and got a job as a secretary, planned to save money, see what kind of education loans I could get and go to night school if necessary.

Before applying for library school I took a battery of tests designed to help someone find what kind of career suited their skills, interests, and personality. It was 2 days of testing and then half a day of interviewing with a counselor about the results--something like that--and cost $100 (at the time a lot of money). Library Science and librarianship were way up on the scale for me, one of the top 3.

It seemed right. And I didn't want to wait. The University of Denver had an accredited Library School; it is a very expensive private school so I applied for a scholarship from the State Library and got it and went back to college. It paid full tuition and I had only to work in a public library in Colorado for a minimum of two years after graduation to honor my scholarship contract. I went to work for two years for Denver Public Library and then headed for California and 32 years with San Francisco Public.

Had I remained a high school English teacher I might be dead by now, having completely worn myself out, or just a poor and weary spinster, living alone with her cats, never married, never having children or grandchildren, never having time to make friends, having memories only of classrooms and fresh-faced teenagers.

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Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 7:48 PM
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"I remember one feedback I received: "Shouldn't be a teacher, not assertive enough." Boy, that really stung at the time, but I now realize the person was right. I am so glad I never went into teaching." - Andrew
----------


Same here. I am definitely NOT an Alpha male. Not competitive, not aggressive, not combative, and I'm a major conflict avoider. It's no wonder that so many people in my life have thought I was gay, including my dad.

My best friend once said to me, "Art, responsibility rolls off you like water off a duck's back."

My job for the first 8.5 years I worked at the UT Vet school was as the facilities manager and I had to supervise 13 employees. It was a constant battle to get them to do any work, that is if they showed up. The second half of my tenure there I worked in Experimental Oncology doing all the Lab Animal Work, which meant giving cancer to animals and then giving them drugs to try and cure them - then at the end of the experiment I euthanized the animals necropsied them looking for tumors and processed the tissue.

I did have a pretty sweet gig at the University of Georgia School of Pharmacy from 1980-1982 managing their little Lab Animal Facility up on the roof. I only had two employees to supervise and unlike the UT Vet School only ~ 6 dogs.

At the UT Vet School at any one time we had hundreds of dogs, ~ 90 cats, rabbits, hamsters, chinchillas, thousands of mice and rats, lemurs, snakes, turtles, lizzards, parrots, pigeons, guinea pigs, etc. etc. etc.

Anyway, going from that to a high school classroom was pretty traumatic. My favorite thing while I was working was to go into a room full of animals by myself and just work taking care of animals for a couple of hours. It was quiet and for that brief period of time no one bothered me.

Art

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Author: lowstudent Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659937 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 8:33 PM
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Same here. I am definitely NOT an Alpha male. Not competitive, not aggressive, not combative, and I'm a major conflict avoider. It's no wonder that so many people in my life have thought I was gay, including my dad.
_________________________

I don't know about most folks out here, but the dean of discipline was not one of the better teachers at any school I ever attended.

In fact the combative or aggressive are the ones I recall as the worst instructors I ever had -- except for 6th grade, Mrs. Hellion was hell on wheels, but a great teacher -- of course she was a creampuff to her better students -- in private.

Anyway, I remember a lot of wimpy teachers, or that is how I looked at them as a pre-teen and teenager. Yet they were some of my favorite teachers, the laid back pot-head who taught economics was one of the best teachers in the school and he was a classic pothead, but he loved economics and made it interesting.

I think it takes a lot to be a great teacher, and you have to just love helping the kids, even the worst of them, and never tire of trying to reach them. I think you have to be forceful in some way to let everyone know you are in charge, but it doesn't take an alpha male or female to do that.

I do not think it is easy, I think it takes forethought and a plan and a desire to provide a service to your consumer just like success in every endeavor at least that's how I saw it when I relived school through my daughter and saw her teachers through an adults eyes.

I think you can be a really good teacher if you are willing to work hard enough or if you just have a great love for and belief in what you are doing.

My guess is great teachers would be good in anything they had a passion for and that great teachers have a passion for dealing with kids and helping them grow. I think getting a job in the field that is truly your passion is rare, and that always having a plan and executing is rare even for folks that get a job in their area of passion.

But aggressive and A type personalities? I do not see it.

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Author: CCinOC Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659947 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 8:51 PM
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lowstudent wrote: I think it takes a lot to be a great teacher, and you have to just love helping the kids, even the worst of them, and never tire of trying to reach them. I think you have to be forceful in some way to let everyone know you are in charge, but it doesn't take an alpha male or female to do that.

My son's first grade teacher was an amazing teacher. In a classroom of rambunctious seven year olds, all she had to do was clap her hands once and every child would freeze where s/he stood. It was one of the weirdest things--but in a good way--I've ever seen.

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Author: 2828 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659949 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 8:53 PM
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My son's first grade teacher was an amazing teacher. In a classroom of rambunctious seven year olds, all she had to do was clap her hands once and every child would freeze where s/he stood. It was one of the weirdest things--but in a good way--I've ever seen.
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That probably made him liberal.

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Author: lowstudent Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659950 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 8:54 PM
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My son's first grade teacher was an amazing teacher. In a classroom of rambunctious seven year olds, all she had to do was clap her hands once and every child would freeze where s/he stood. It was one of the weirdest things--but in a good way--I've ever seen.
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At that age, they are desperate to please, you just have to give them a good outlet to do it.

Now, someone doing that in say 7th grade? I would want blood tests to ensure they were human.

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Author: CCinOC Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659951 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 8:55 PM
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2828 wrote: That probably made him liberal.

I frankly wish I knew. Still bothers me a lot that I managed to raise a libtard. I don't get it. I really don't.

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Author: arrete Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659960 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 9:30 PM
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I remember that when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be a teacher when I grew up. In 9th grade Civics class we spent a week researching careers, and each student had to pick a career they might like, do some research and then give a brief presentation to the class on their chosen career. Then other students offered written anonymous feedback.

I remember one feedback I received: "Shouldn't be a teacher, not assertive enough." Boy, that really stung at the time, but I now realize the person was right. I am so glad I never went into teaching.
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I actually thought I wanted to teach Economics, university level. Then I realized what my collegues would be like. Forget it. I love teaching. I hate academic a$$hats.

arrete - so I'll be teaching recorder in the spring. I'm a pretty good teacher. I know how to break it down into bits that are easy to earn. I know how to offer different ways to learn. But I've never had to teach kids who want to be out shooting squirrels.

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Author: AOLFoolman100 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659962 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 9:42 PM
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I remember that when I was a kid I thought I wanted to be a teacher when I grew up. In 9th grade Civics class we spent a week researching careers, and each student had to pick a career they might like, do some research and then give a brief presentation to the class on their chosen career. Then other students offered written anonymous feedback.



I get the opposite feedback. I have my sister (who knows me very well) and a few very close friends, who believe I need to be a teacher or professor. They say that I would be a great instructor or lecturer.

They think I have this need to want to disseminate knowledge.....yeah, I think many of you sense it here on this board when i get too technical. I like to drone on and one about Global Warming (in years past) about math, and about weather and what not.

This is even more relevant given I am unemployed. I sort of want a new profession, but what?!?

They say I need to teach, given my propensity to disseminate knowledge ....somewhere?? High school? College?? Yes, I like to lecture and teach to people who I know are smart, receptive and want to learn. But I certainly can't imagine myself going to class...OMG...and grading papers...are you kidding?? I don't have a Ph.D!!

I have an mechanical engineering degree and an MBA. But I don't have any "indepth", biting knowledge in any particular area. I am a "Jack of All Trades, but Master of None".

But I know I have the gift of presentation....even growing up shy...from college to all my positions as an engineer and later as a consultant in the business world, everyone has told me I can present and communicate very well. I still don't believe it. But apparently, everyone else thinks so.....

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Author: arrete Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659970 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/13/2012 11:14 PM
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Maybe I did well as a teacher, in terms of discipline, because I had a little storeroom my grandmother let me use as a clubhouse and I would gather all the younger kids in the neighborhood up, bring them in and we often played school, especially when it was raining or snowing out. I was always the teacher.
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I did that. Their moms loved it. Not sure about the kids.

I thought about teachng high school, but my daughter sai don't do it. Since she was in high school at the time (Catholic at that) I guess she knew. I do like high school students.

arrete - DH gave me an old Bluetooth key. I'll try to attach it tomorrow because the lap top one has gone crazy.

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 659973 of 741923
Subject: Re: Millionaires, Billionaires, and Teachers Date: 12/14/2012 12:02 AM
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"But I've never had to teach kids who want to be out shooting squirrels." - arrete


I'm all done with it for this life. I earned back enough money teaching to pay for the classes I took and then I quit. I will never teach again. I promise.

Art

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