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Author: tlbate Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 13860  
Subject: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/18/2003 9:45 PM
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I hear it said all too often: "I was like, Oh My God!"

Really! The English language has so many colorful, expressive ways to say something that I just cringe when I hear the above expression. In addition, it's annoying to hear such disrespect given to the Almighty.


Terry
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Author: averagjoe Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3079 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 2:37 AM
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"I was like, Oh My God!"
"...it's annoying to hear such disrespect given to the Almighty.

That's disrespect? If that's the worst reference you've heard to God, you must live a very protected life.

~aj


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Author: SamuraiWil Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3080 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 3:41 AM
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"I was like, Oh My God!"

Well, it's certainly more succinct and spontaneous than saying, "I was suddenly infused with an intense spirit of amazement and delight that far surpassed any emotion I had hitherto experienced."



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Author: DirtyDingus Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3081 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 10:54 AM
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"I was like, Oh My God!"
The first time I heard anyone say that it was a Californian lady, who omitted to pause for the comma or stress the Oh my God the way I expected it. As a result I was briefly left wondering what "a magad" was and in what way the speaker resembled it before losing track of the story anyway.

I had an uncharacteristically hard time understadning her - she seemed determined to speak using idiom and slang which I didn't understand, spoke at about 3 times normal speed and so on. I can state categorically that my incomprehension was utterly unrelated to the maount of alcohol I had consumed :)

DD

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Author: sheila727 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3082 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 11:07 AM
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I hear it said all too often: "I was like, Oh My God!"

Really! The English language has so many colorful, expressive ways to say something that I just cringe when I hear the above expression. In addition, it's annoying to hear such disrespect given to the Almighty.



You obviously don't have an 18-year-old daughter!!!!! What more can I say -- except that this bears absolutely no relation to the Almighty whatsoever.


sheila



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Author: joebedford Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3083 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 11:07 AM
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Mine is when people are relating a conversation, and say, "Then I go...then she goes..." instead of, "Then I said...then she said..."

:-)

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Author: rigoletto39 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3086 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 3:09 PM
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"I was like," is one of those phrases that grate on me like fingernails on a slate blackboard. I even hear people older than 18 - who should know better - using it.

"He went" for "he said", is just as bad.


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Author: sheila727 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3087 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 4:04 PM
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It's a minor pet peeve, but it bugs me nonetheless.....people who begin so many of their responses with "yeah, no." It isn't said to indicate the lack of any clear cut answer. It's simply some sort of verbal knee-jerk or hiccup that precedes responses of every sort.


And I realize that I should have answered the initial "pet peeve" comment slightly differently than I did. So--here's take 2.

When I read your comment I was like, Oh my God! This person definitely does not have a teen-aged girl living at home! (Sorry if it grates, but on second thought, I couldn't resist.)


sheila

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Author: snie Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3090 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 7:55 PM
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This one drives me crazy:

How cool is that?!
How cute are you?!
Said more as a statement than a question.

I cringe even more when I hear it come out of my own mouth.

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Author: richdaughter Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3091 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 8:11 PM
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My current favourite:

"That was so fun"

My usual response - Would the addition of a "much" kill you? To which th e answer usually is "huh??"

RichDaughter

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Author: Daddyswish Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3092 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/19/2003 8:49 PM
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"I was like," is one of those phrases that grate on me like fingernails on a slate blackboard. I even hear people older than 18 - who should know better - using it.

"He went" for "he said", is just as bad.



While I love engaging in nitpicking on this board and consider it quite fruitful, here is a situation in which I must come to the defense of the many informal constructs commonly applied in spoken dialogue. In fact, with no disrespect to any of my fellow logophiles here, I would go as far as to say that intolerance of various forms of appropriately applied slang is one of my bigger language-related pet peeves.

A phrase such as, "I was like 'Oh my God!'" in an informal conversation conveys the emotion and surprise of the described situation, particularly when combined with an excited tone of voice and other non-verbal cues, far more effectively and succinctly than a more formal construct. It also subtly implies that "Oh my God" is not necessarily what was literally said. That might merely be what the speaker was thinking, or it might be a very abbreviated version of what was actually said, depending on the context. In many cases, a more formal version of the sentence will come across as awkward or flat.

The truth is, young people are by far the most important and active linguistic innovators in society. What older generations see as corruption and impurity in usage are often trends that actually help the language better reflect the contemporary world. This is, in fact, the case with the examples in this thread: interpersonal relationships tend to be much less structured and rigid than they used to be, and in kind, informal language constructs are much more common. A similar example is the increasingly frequent use of "they" as a gender-neutral singular pronoun, which reflects the contemporary importance of avoiding the appearance of sexism sometimes exceeding the importance of proper formal grammar.

This may cause you to ponder, "Swish, why do you even post here if you don't care if the English language goes to hell in a handbasket?" My first answer would be that I love advancing the use of formal or forgotten language in appropriate contexts, and that in such situations, consistency and propriety (i.e., adherence to the "rules") play a very important role. But more specific to this discussion, there's a very fuzzy line between incorrect or inappropriate usage and informal usage. I would argue that "I was like" is not actually grammatically incorrect because the phrase is an idiom that serves as a transitive verb. Conversely, if the phrase were, "Me and Dave are going to the concert," I would argue that "Me and Dave" is not an idiom, it's simply a grammatically sloppy substitute for the semantically identical phrase "Dave and I," which I strongly prefer even in informal dialogue.

Another consideration that plays into my educational background is the fact that the study of Cognitive Linguistics has advanced considerably since linguists stopped dismissing constructs that violate traditional usage guidelines as unimportant anomalies. It's the exceptions to the rules that provide the most insight into the way the human mind works. For example, can anyone tell me what the past tense of the verb "sping" is? Well, technically there is none, since "sping" is not an English word. But if it were? I'm sure everyone would answer "spang," and even "spung" for the past participle. But did any of you know there was a rule for creating past tense by ending certain words with "-ang?" Here we all thought that "sing, sang, sung" was an exception. But I digress. The point is that contemporary informal usage of the word "like" is also a very interesting phenomenon with sociological implications. Embracing the anomaly is far more productive than decrying it.

However, the most important consideration of all is the setting. In virtually all written contexts, and in many interpersonal ones, the informal usages above are highly inappropriate. In business settings, proper language usage plays an important role in conveying professionalism, and in other situations proper language conveys respect. I would argue that it's very important to know the rules and to use correct formal English when appropriate. But in many situations, the informal constructs serve as a worthwhile aid, and not a hinderance, to communication. So relax, take a deep breath, and hug your nearest teenager. She will become a much more effective sentinel for the English of the future if you don't write her off.


Swish

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Author: sheila727 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3093 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/20/2003 12:23 AM
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I would argue that it's very important to know the rules and to use correct formal English when appropriate. But in many situations, the informal constructs serve as a worthwhile aid, and not a hinderance, to communication. So relax, take a deep breath, and hug your nearest teenager. She will become a much more effective sentinel for the English of the future if you don't write her off.


Swish



My daughter would be so delighted with your perspective. Her mother most certainly is. And I much enjoyed the eloquence with which you articulated it.

When these girls get together and talk about what's happening, about their loves and hates, there's such vitality and joy and physicality in their speech. I relish the bits and pieces that drift my way.

Every generation "invents" phrases and speech patterns that define them as a separate group. It's part of how language evolves. And I don't think these newer patterns irritate many of us because they in fact derogate the rules, but because they conflict with what has been the extent of our known language world. Many of these rules are not immutable--they are simply familiar. Many people sturdily resist letting go of what they have been taught to regard as truth. Scientific progress is littered with similar denunciations. Look at the outcry when Galileo and Copernicus proclaimed their observation that the earth revolves around the sun. And so it goes.

My gripe is with changes in language that diminish meaning, that rob it of expressiveness, that add needless complexity--not with those that imbue it with new color and energy.


sheila
(who is looking forward to a house full of teenaged girls next week, exchanging their freshman college experiences. My grad student son is staying on campus--2 coast-to-coast flights in just several days is "too unsettling" says the budding aeronautic/astronautic engineer.)



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Author: rigoletto39 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3095 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/20/2003 4:40 PM
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While I love engaging in nitpicking on this board and consider it quite fruitful, here is a situation in which I must come to the defense of the many informal constructs commonly applied in spoken dialogue.

Well said. There is spoken English, and there is written English, and no-one really expects spoken English to roll off the tongue like an oration of Cicero. Especially since he spoke mostly Latin.

My unhappiness with "he goes..." is mainly that there's already a perfectly good word: "he said..". You "go" to the store, to the bathroom, to college,.....

But then, I'm the kind of guy who jumps up in the Star Wars movie and says, "Things don't go BOOM in space!!!"

Hmmm. There, "go" seems to apply to 2 senses: "go" in the colloquial sense, as to make a sound, or in the technical sense, as to occur.

OK - back to reading Edwardian novels.

Speaking of which, on last night's "Jeopardy", one of the categories was Thomas Hardy novels. They described the basics of the plot and asked for the title. There won't be many Disney adaptations of those.

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Author: dginley Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3096 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/20/2003 5:49 PM
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Sorry, you can only recommend a post to the Best of once.

But then, I'm the kind of guy who jumps up in the Star Wars movie and says, "Things don't go BOOM in space!!!"


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Author: Daddyswish Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3097 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/20/2003 5:59 PM
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But then, I'm the kind of guy who jumps up in the Star Wars movie and says, "Things don't go BOOM in space!!!"

Just because you wouldn't be able to hear it doesn't mean they don't go BOOM.


Swish (back to nitpicking) ;D

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Author: dginley Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3098 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/20/2003 10:14 PM
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So rigoletto39 was like, 'But then, I'm the kind of guy who jumps up in the Star Wars movie and says, "Things don't go BOOM in space!!!"'

And then DaddySwish went, "Just because you wouldn't be able to hear it doesn't mean they don't go BOOM."

So then I go "I have to disagree."

Here's what m-w.com says:

Main Entry: boom
Function: noun
Date: circa 1500
1 : a booming sound or cry
2 : a rapid expansion or increase: as a : a general movement in support of a candidate for office, b : rapid settlement and development of a town or district, c : a rapid widespread expansion of economic activity.

Since the second meaning appears to be restricted to the non-physical, I still think things don't go BOOM in space.

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Author: rigoletto39 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3099 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/21/2003 1:25 PM
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Just because you wouldn't be able to hear it doesn't mean they don't go BOOM.

If a tree falls in a forest, and there's nobody there to hear it, is there any sound?

Of course not. If there's nobody there, there's no forest.

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Author: Daddyswish Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3100 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/21/2003 1:42 PM
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Main Entry: boom
Function: noun
Date: circa 1500
1 : a booming sound or cry
2 : a rapid expansion or increase: as a : a general movement in support of a candidate for office, b : rapid settlement and development of a town or district, c : a rapid widespread expansion of economic activity.

Since the second meaning appears to be restricted to the non-physical, I still think things don't go BOOM in space.


Since stuff is blowing up, you can bet it's making lots of noise. That noise just wouldn't propagate through the vaccuum.

Anyone want to talk about why those X-wing fighters always bank their turns in space?


Swish

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Author: rigoletto39 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3101 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/21/2003 2:25 PM
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Anyone want to talk about why those X-wing fighters always bank their turns in space?

One answer is to keep the G-forces perpendicular to the floor. Why they have wings at all is another question. (I don't know if they're supposed to work in an atmosphere.)

Then there was the editorial in the New York Times [I think] in the 30s or 40s in which the writer scoffed at Goddard's rocket experiments, because, as everybody knows, they won't work in space, because there's nothing for the exhaust to push against.

They published a retraction a few years ago.

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Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3102 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/21/2003 2:37 PM
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Since stuff is blowing up, you can bet it's making lots of noise. That noise just wouldn't propagate through the vaccuum.

If it's in a vacuum, there can't be any noise to begin with except for the folks inside the ship in the microseconds between the onset of the boom and the dissipation of the ship's air.

There are other definitions of noise that may pertain:

2 c : an unwanted signal or a disturbance (as static or a variation of voltage) in an electronic device or instrument (as radio or television); broadly : a disturbance interfering with the operation of a usually mechanical device or system d : electromagnetic radiation (as light or radio waves) that is composed of several frequencies and that involves random changes in frequency or amplitude

4 : something that attracts attention <the play... will make little noise in the world -- Brendan Gill>

From http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary

--fleg

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Author: foolme1111 Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3107 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/28/2003 12:30 AM
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If a tree falls in a forest, and there's nobody there to hear it, is there any sound?

Of course not. If there's nobody there, there's no forest

____________

If I speak, and no woman hears me, am I still wrong?

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Author: DirtyDingus Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3109 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 11/28/2003 4:46 AM
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If I speak, and no woman hears me, am I still wrong?

YES :)

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Author: dcarper Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3135 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 12/8/2003 1:58 PM
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Anyone want to talk about why those X-wing fighters always bank their turns in space?

Simple. So that the G-forces generated are pushing the pilot into the seat. Forcing him to the side or top would be quite uncomfortable, and make it difficult to maintain control.


And yes, explosions do go BOOM in space. It's just a very muted BOOM. ;-)

David

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Author: DanAuito Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3377 of 13860
Subject: Re: My pet peeve of the year Date: 2/6/2004 12:25 AM
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Wow, Swish, tell us a story!

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