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Author: DBAVelvet74 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 21259  
Subject: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 11:14 AM
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I am going to start trying to perfect a lasagna recipe.

Any general tips, advice, options on boil vs. no boil noodles, etc.?

I know to let it rest after baking before cutting, any other helpful tips like that?

Thanks

PS I am doing Weight Watchers, so any tips toward leaner/lighter are also greatly appreciated as well as any stumbling blocks with using egg whites or fat free ricotta.
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Author: hockeymomof3 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14506 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 12:29 PM
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Any general tips, advice, options on boil vs. no boil noodles, etc.?
...
I am doing Weight Watchers, so any tips toward leaner/lighter are also greatly appreciated as well as any stumbling blocks with using egg whites or fat free ricotta.


I never boil lasagne noodles anymore. Sometimes I use the 'no boil' kind, sometimes just regular ones. Either way, I just rinse the noodle under running water and build the lasagne. Maybe I add 1/2 cup water to my sauce. Noodles are always just fine.

I use reduced fat ricotta and mix in eggbeaters for stability. Everyone here enjoys that more than the cottage cheese variety. The parmesan and mozarella I simply use the part skim kind in moderation. The fat free stuff is nasty in situations where melting is key.

Generally I am lazy and use jarred sauce. The healthy choice reduced fat and sodium kind is just fine. Might stir in some of my favorite Emeril's roasted gaaaarlic kind too. The meateaters here insist on meat so I'll use ground round (96% lean) and rinse the browned beef before adding to remove residual fat. Occasionally I'll sneak in a layer of spinach. Sometimes I'll use italian sausage...a little adds a lot of flavor.

To bake, I cover with foil for the first 45 minutes or so and remove foil for the remaining 15 minutes. Then I remove and let rest awhile.

Good luck! I'll be watching this thread for further tips!

Teri

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Author: RocketsMomma Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14510 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 3:39 PM
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I used to boil the noodles and then vented my frustration aloud when they tore into pieces as I tried to lay them into the pan.

I just stick 'em in dry now and increase the liquid just a bit, maybe 1/4 to 1/3 cup. I've also found that letting the finished lasagne sit for a couple hours before baking seems to help in keeping the noodles from being too chewy. That's only happened the first time I tried no boil noodles.

RM - doesn't own a pasta machine, so don't you purists start crying about packaged noodles or I'll start posting Spam and generic Velvetta recipes


;-p


PS to SB, is there such a thing as generic Spam?

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Author: michaelangela Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14511 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 4:18 PM
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RM - doesn't own a pasta machine, so don't you purists start crying about packaged noodles...

I hear ya, but one of the most awesome things you'll ever eat in your life is gen-you-wine "Pasta al Forno".

Step 1: Find an Italian grandmother. Grandmother must be at least 80 years old.

Step 2: Watch as grandmother gets up at 5:30 to start making noodles and sauce.

Step 3: Watch grandmother patiently kneed dough, then roll into impossibly thin strips. Note how she does this with (seemingly) no effort, a constant smile, and persistent conversation (in Italian).

Step 4: Watch grandmother build lasagna-type dish with 25+ layers of super-thin noodles in ~2-1/2" of height. Note that quantities of sauce & meat are less than one might expect.

Step 5: Put tray(s) in oven (you can do this part).

Step 6: Watch grandmother serve perfect, tall, straight, architecturally sound pieces with so many layers they're harder to count than tree rings.

Step 7: Gently press fork sideways down through the corner of your piece. Feel the delicate, staccato tug & release as the fork cascades through the many layers of texture-unlike-anything-else egg noodles.

Step 8: Sit back and cry because (a) when grandma "goes" you ain't gettin' anything like this ever again, (b) you know you could never produce anything as remotely simple, yet perfect, and (c) you've just learned why, in America, it's all about the sauce, but in Italy it's all about the macaroni.

Yeah, those grandmothers knew all about gestalt!

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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14512 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 4:38 PM
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RE: MA: "Step 1: Find an Italian grandmother. Grandmother must be at least 80 years old."

Italian Grandmothers are known as Nonas. There are still a few extant in these parts, but even these are first generation American born by now.

It's not very often they'll make pasta from scratch, especially since there's such good quality available in the stores these days, but if one of the grandchildren volunteers to help maybe Nona will show them how it was done "in the olden days".

SB (think of Martin Scorsese's "Aunt Fanny" who appears on Sara Moulton's shows)



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Author: TMFRavynous Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14513 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 4:38 PM
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In all honesty this thread should end with michaelangela's post. Hell, I honestly considered starting a new one so it would. But I'm a lazy git.

Though an Italian nona would never approve, if you're cooking for one or two here's a trick.

Use a loaf pan. It's perfect for one noodle wide lasagna. I can eat 3 or 4 slices, and then slice and freeze the rest of it.

Oh, I use spag sauce. When I make it I make a gallon which is very little for many people here, but a lot for me. I freeze it in reasonable use quantities, and use that. Of course done via crockpot.

If you found a Strega Nona they could fill your freezer for a lifetime.

RAv

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Author: DBAVelvet74 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14514 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 4:47 PM
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if you're cooking for one or two here's a trick.

Use a loaf pan. It's perfect for one noodle wide lasagna.


Actually, I am cooking for one and was wondering if I was going to freeze several servings or actually eat 6-8 servings in the course of a week.

That may be the route to go :)

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Author: nggCatgoyle Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14515 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 5:24 PM
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Oh, I use spag sauce. When I make it I make a gallon which is very little for many people here, but a lot for me. I freeze it in reasonable use quantities, and use that.

I haven't made lasagne is a very long time (hmmm, perhaps when the kitchen is done, and the weather cools off...).

When I'm in the mood to cook a batch/vat of something, I love to make Italian "red sauce." I don't think of it as spaghetti sauce, because I use the same sauce in spaghetti, lasagne, and with other types of pasta, even pizza. Significant chopping, sauteing, and stirring is involved, layering of flavors over several hours, with lots of tasting and refining, until it is "just so." The process itself is very calming and therapeutic. When complete, the sauce gets used for some pasta purpose, then divided into smaller containers and frozen for use at a later time. The last container may become "starter" for a new batch at some future point.

Perhaps that will be my first adventure with the new cooktop. Or maybe some machaca. I haven't made that in a long time, and RealNGG has been suggesting that it would be useful to have some around...

And I really like the idea of making lasagne in a loaf pan, great idea, RAv!

Cori

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Author: TMFRavynous Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14516 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 7:05 PM
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And I really like the idea of making lasagne in a loaf pan, great idea, RAv!


It works just like big pan, yet you end up with 6/8 slices. Enough for one or two with left overs. It's marvelous.

I guess I shouldn't call it spag sauce, but red sauce. I use it for spag, add more cheese, olives, more green pepper with elbows or flat noodles and I've got Johnny Marezti, spread it on a tortilla, top at will and ditto for pizza crust. Plus we've already cover it's use in lasagna. However, tired old guy that I am, I'm probably going to still call it spag sauce. However you're right it's a very versatile red sauce.

RAv
Vive L' Sauce Rouge (?)

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Author: michaelangela Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14519 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 10:36 PM
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Italian Grandmothers are known as Nonas.

OK, let's get this straight: the Italian word for grandmother is "nonna". The plural of all nouns ending in "a" is formed by replacing the "a" with an "e". So, Italian grandmothers are known as "nonne" (NOHNN-eh...dwell a bit on that double consonant). Correspondingly, if you've got more than one pizza, you've got "pizze".

Let me tell you why you care: so you don't go into the ladies' restroom! See, signora is "woman". Signore is "man". But public bathrooms aren't labeled "woman" and "man"; they're labeled "women" and "men". But tourists often don't stick with the language class quite long enough to get to the bit about plurals. So guys tend to charge through the first door that says Signore, rather than being sure to check for Signori.

It's not very often they'll make pasta from scratch...

This is a shame because it's really special, fun and easy (once you know the tricks**). Heck, I've made homemade noodles after work on week nights.

MA
**in case you're curious, there are exactly 4 tricks.

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Author: michaelangela Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14520 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/2/2004 10:43 PM
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Vive L' Sauce Rouge (?)

...lo sugo rosso (although nobody calls it that), in Italian!

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Author: OleDocJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14523 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 7:53 AM
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**in case you're curious, there are exactly 4 tricks.


Do tell!


OleDoc


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Author: stellla Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14524 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 8:20 AM
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**in case you're curious, there are exactly 4 tricks.

What OleDoc said. I don't think you're allowed to tease like that. We're curious, we're curious! Teach us, Oh Great Noodleoni. Noodleante? Noodlenose?

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Author: ekimnos Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14526 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 9:44 AM
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I've been boiling my noodles for one-half the time recommended on the box and it works well - helps me bend the ends to better fit the pan. After reading these posts, I'll try it without boiling next time.

As far as reducing fat - for the last few years I've been making my multi-purpose, red, Itlaian meat sauce with ground turkey. Works great, tastes great. Use the regular ground turkey - not the reduced fat turkey. Add a little more olive oil to the pan when browning.

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Author: ELVIS007 Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14527 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 10:06 AM
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I always try to add bigger clumps of ricotta cheeze, along with halved
rather than sliced muchrooms. Also larger onion and tomatoe pieces rather than diced.

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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14528 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 10:53 AM
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RE: ELV: "I always try to add bigger clumps of ricotta cheeze, along with halved rather than sliced muchrooms. Also larger onion and tomatoe pieces rather than diced."

I do just the opposite. Relying on my engineering experience, I use ingredients of uniform thickness to constuct nice even layers. I even go so far as to preferring leftover meatloaf in my lasagne so I can use it to adjust for the difference in thickness between the side includes mushrooms vs the other('s) side.

SB (values structural integrity in food)


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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14530 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 11:14 AM
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RE: MA: "OK, let's get this straight: the Italian word for grandmother is "nonna". The plural of all nouns ending in "a" is formed by replacing the "a" with an "e"."

I'll accede to your vastly superior knowledge of the Italian language on this point. Where and when I grew up the word was oft-spoken but unwritten, used along with either the woman's first or last name, ie; "Nona" Justina or "Nona" Valentini. As such, a plural form was hardly ever needed.

As far as handmaking pasta goes, I suppose having to do it all the time probably removed whatever "fun" might have been inherent in the process?

SB (not Italian, but grew up surrounded by them)

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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14531 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 11:25 AM
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RE: RM: "PS to SB, is there such a thing as generic Spam?"

Unfortunately, yes. You can add this to the list of information you probably could have lived happily without.

There are several other canned luncheon meat products on the market including Treet, Celebrity and some generic brands. The generic and store brand products can usually be found in poorer areas, and are often ditributed through government surplus food programs.

There is also a Dutch brand called Tulip (clever marketing huh?) that's supposedly a bit less salty trying to compete with Spam in their biggest market, Hawaii.

SB (even worse, there's generic Velveeta!)


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Author: GeeBeeNC Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14532 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 12:39 PM
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Teach us, Oh Great Noodleoni. Noodleante? Noodlenose?


Stellla!

There's only one of her, wouldn't that make her a Noodleanta or Noodlenosa?

GeeB, paying attention to all her posts.

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Author: michaelangela Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14533 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 1:42 PM
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As far as handmaking pasta goes, I suppose having to do it all the time probably removed whatever "fun" might have been inherent in the process?

Well, that sorta depends on one's perspective. I voluntarily commute every day in heavy traffic, and I don't find it particularly "fun".

Yes, for you & me, doing this daily would get a little old. But that's viewed through the lens of our American, middle-class, multi-car, shopping mall, TV/radio/VCR/DVD/Internet world. Cooking from scratch is avocational for us.

The grandmother I described (not my own, BTW) has never known that world. By the time she was inserted into it, she had lived too long the other way to ever assimilate. Her whole day -- every day -- was spent cooking & keeping house for her family. That was her job, and she took a quiet pride & satisfaction in it (think 'Ma Joad' from The Grapes of Wrath, maybe). She had no car -- there was nowhere she needed to drive!

We get up and drive to work every day; she got up and made macaroni. We interact with our coworkers; she interacted with the neighbor ladies. We derive satisfaction from doing our jobs well; she took great satisfaction from providing for her family. Making pasta was, in effect, her vocation.

So "fun" may just not be the right word. Do we have "fun", per se, at work every day? No, but we generally find satisfaction. So did she.

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Author: NaggingFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14535 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 3:44 PM
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Add a little more olive oil to the pan when browning.

I don't add any oil to the pan when browning ground meat. Mind you, I'm using a nonstick pan.

I just keep the meet moving with my spatula. Extra oil not required.

- Megan


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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14536 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 3:49 PM
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RE: Megan: "I'm using a nonstick pan"

I've always found browning and nonstick pans to be a misnomer. It either ain't brown, or it did stick.

SB (but they work good for eggs though)

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Author: NaggingFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14537 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 3:53 PM
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I've always found browning and nonstick pans to be a misnomer. It either ain't brown, or it did stick.


While I agree with you for pieces of meat, I don't find that to be a problem with ground beef.

- Megan


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Author: SRHCB Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14538 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 4:01 PM
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RE: Megan: "I agree with you for pieces of meat, I don't find that to be a problem with ground beef."

That's true. I wonder why that is? Do you use any oil at all when browning ground beef? When do you salt it?

Maybe the built in fat in ground is what does it?

SB (wondering)




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Author: DBAVelvet74 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14546 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 5:21 PM
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Any chance of getting a posting of a good red sauce for use in lasagna?

The main issue I think I ran into was that my sauce was chunky and not smooth. It left some spots dry and some too wet.

I suspect if I had taken a blender to it it might have worked out better, but it was still edible, and gives me a starting point.

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Author: stellla Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14547 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/3/2004 5:36 PM
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Any chance of getting a posting of a good red sauce for use in lasagna?

I'll second that. I have a recipe that's on the sweet side for me. How do you move a red sauce from sweet to savory?

(Don't know what is up today with me being social; I'm being a posting fool around the boards.)

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Author: dsinclair Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14554 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/4/2004 3:54 AM
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stella posted:

"I'll second that. I have a recipe that's on the sweet side for me. How do you move a red sauce from sweet to savory?"

I have found that a cup or two dry red wine works well for me.

good investing and cooking
dsinclair


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Author: ddrumm Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14586 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/4/2004 6:50 PM
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Michelangela,

You left out the daily food shopping for which the freshest,best quality ingredients were integral to the wonderful meals.

ddrumm

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Author: nggCatgoyle Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14594 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/5/2004 12:25 AM
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I have a recipe that's on the sweet side for me. How do you move a red sauce from sweet to savory?

Okay, RealNGG & I discussed it, and here are some of our thoughts.

The aforementioned red wine is a good idea, or some red wine vinegar.

If you want it more spicy, some hot sauce or dried pepper flakes, and the hot will balance the sweetness. Chipotle peppers if you want some smokiness.

Add bitter herbs, such as oregano, marjoram, summer savory or thyme. Some pesto sauce might also be a nice addition.

You might also add some Worcestershire sauce; I find that adds a nice, subtle complexity, and I almost always use that in my red sauces. Or, if you're feeling a little adventurous, add some chopped anchovies and cook them down into the sauce.

Add some finely grated dry cheese like a parmesan, dry jack or something similar.

Chop & add some fresh basil and/or scallions just before serving a pasta dish to "brighten it up."

We'll be interested in knowing what you decide to do with your sauce, and how you feel about the results!

Cori



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Author: stellla Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14605 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/5/2004 2:11 PM
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These are some great ideas. I think it's a really good sign that some of them immediately sound appealing (Worcestershire sauce, anchovies).

I have quite a bit frozen from the last batch I made, probably enough to split into two and try different experiments on each.

Thanks!

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Author: zsimpson Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14646 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/9/2004 5:49 PM
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Oh, I use spag sauce. When I make it I make a gallon which is very little for many people here, but a lot for me. I freeze it in reasonable use quantities, and use that. Of course done via crockpot.

Are you talking about me when I'm not looking?
Kathleen
<grin>

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Author: zsimpson Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14647 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/9/2004 5:55 PM
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When I'm in the mood to cook a batch/vat of something, I love to make Italian "red sauce." I don't think of it as spaghetti sauce, because I use the same sauce in spaghetti, lasagne, and with other types of pasta, even pizza. Significant chopping, sauteing, and stirring is involved, layering of flavors over several hours, with lots of tasting and refining, until it is "just so." The process itself is very calming and therapeutic. When complete, the sauce gets used for some pasta purpose, then divided into smaller containers and frozen for use at a later time. The last container may become "starter" for a new batch at some future point.

That's what I do also, but I usually have most of the stuff cut up in advance. We grow our own tomatoes, and I cna them, so they get chopped when I am canning. I buy 25+ pounds of Vidalias at a time and chop them up and put them into Ziplock sandwich bags 2 cups per baggie. I do the same for celery. We grow a lot of our herbs and I dry those out, so they are all set, too.
I think the hardest part is sitting in the house while the smell wafts through it.

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Author: rvbradish Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14648 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/9/2004 6:03 PM
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"I think the hardest part is sitting in the house while the smell wafts through it."

Yep, ain't it wonderful? If you think of it when it's convenient, K, how 'bout posting your favorite spaghetti sauce (1 gallon) recipe. I never have made it from scratch, and your description smells so good I feel the urge to try.

Ray

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Author: zsimpson Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14649 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/9/2004 6:30 PM
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Yep, ain't it wonderful? If you think of it when it's convenient, K, how 'bout posting your favorite spaghetti sauce (1 gallon) recipe. I never have made it from scratch, and your description smells so good I feel the urge to try.

Um Ray, I learned how to make spaghetti sauce from a very sweet little Italian woman. Quite literally, when I make a sauce, whatever happens to be in the kitchen (and garden) at the time goes in. One of the best tips I've ever gotten is chocolate. a few ounces of chocolate into a large batch is really wonderful. At various times, I've put sausage, ground beef, three different basils, olive oil, grated cheese, sesame seeds, onions, celery, oregano, rosemary, tarragon, ground pork, ground veal, garlic, ginger, squash, and peppers of varying heat.
About the only constant is tomatoes.

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Author: zsimpson Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14650 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/9/2004 6:34 PM
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Yep, ain't it wonderful? If you think of it when it's convenient, K, how 'bout posting your favorite spaghetti sauce (1 gallon) recipe. I never have made it from scratch, and your description smells so good I feel the urge to try.

I'll gladly drop some off for you next time I go north, though.
Kathleen
(has a soft spot for old farts)

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Author: zsimpson Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14655 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/9/2004 10:11 PM
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Yep, ain't it wonderful? If you think of it when it's convenient, K, how 'bout posting your favorite spaghetti sauce (1 gallon) recipe. I never have made it from scratch, and your description smells so good I feel the urge to try.

I may not be able to give you a recipe per se, but I can give you guide lines, if that will help.
Do this part between the stove and the sink.
Get a bunch of ripe, ready tomatoes. Get a small pot of water boiling. Get another pot of water icy cold. I usually keep a bucket of ice cubes nearby to add a few as is necessary. Put the tomatoes in the boiling water for just a second, remove them and put them in the icy water. This allows you to peel the skins off. As you are peeling, chop the tomatoes into a stewing pot. I usually make a very large batches, so I can't really put down my amounts of anything, besides I rarely measure anything. Put the tomatoes on the heat on low. Add whatever you think best, but garlic, basil, oregano, chopped onions and celery seem to be the most universal ingredients. Simmer this for several hours, 6+. Scrape the sides down as you go and if necessary smush the tomatoes chunks with a spoon as you go. The stuff on the sides is what really gives the flavor.
I add dozens of different things in depending upon my mood and what's in the kitchen, usually more than even my stock pot can hold.
Hope this helps, if that isn't enough detail, I can attempt again.

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Author: rvbradish Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14657 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/10/2004 11:25 AM
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"Hope this helps, if that isn't enough detail, I can attempt again."

Preparing for my grand experiment (well, maybe not QUITE from scratch):

3 28-oz cans Tomato Puree
1 12-ox can tomato paste
1.5/2 cups Chopped Onions
3 oz Hersheys Milk Chocolate
1 lb Sweet Italian Sausage
1 lb Ground Beef
1 tbsp Basil
1 tbsp Olive Oil
2 tbsp Red & Green dried diced peppers
2 tbsp dried Parsley
2 tbsp dried Celery dices
2.5 tsp Oregano
2 cups dry Red Wine
6 cloves garlic (crushed)
4 whole Bay Leaves
2 tsp "No-Salt"
2 tbsp Sugar

Fry meat, then add it and all other contents to crockpot, and cook for 6 plus hours.

Any comments/suggestions?

Ray

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Author: TMFRavynous Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 14658 of 21259
Subject: Re: need lasagna advice Date: 8/10/2004 12:16 PM
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Any comments/suggestions?


It's an idle suggestion, because as Kathleen pointed out, this is so much to individual taste, but I'd swap out one can of puree for diced tomatoes, or even whole/stewed tomatoes. I use the ones with garlic and onion in them. Not that I chop any less of the real thing. ;) The sugar looks a bit much to me, and I don't use bay, then again I don't like bay, but again those are strictly what you like and are accustomed to. I looke forward to hearing how it comes out.

RAv
Yes, Kathleen, you're the one that came to mind. ;)

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