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Author: desertdaveataol Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 886165  
Subject: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/2/2013 2:48 PM
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The rise of gourmet toddler takeout: How busy New York parents are splashing out on $18-a-meal organic food deliveries for their children

Brooklyn-based Komi Organics delivery menu includes grilled Arctic char with herbed quinoa, julienned red pepper and cucumber; and peach noodle kugel with Swedish meatballs.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2256124/The-rise-g...
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Author: legalwordwarrior Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870044 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/2/2013 3:49 PM
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'It’s important to me to provide my son with healthy, locally sourced food. Since I work from home with only a part-time nanny, it really helps me optimize the time I spend with him.'

Whatever happened to the good old days when moms taught their children how to cook as part of the time they spent with their kids?

LWW

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Author: tconi Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870055 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 8:22 AM
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I am just annoyed that *I* didnt think of this market

peace & ideas
t

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Author: alstroemeria Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870056 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 9:13 AM
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Whatever happened to the good old days when moms taught their children how to cook as part of the time they spent with their kids?

My Mom was a 50s Mom and didn't like to cook and I only learned a little by watching (she preferred nobody in the kitchen with her, though--it was her time to chill out). She mostly fixed broiled meat or baked chicken pieces, frozen/canned veg, rice, iceberg lettuce and canned fruit salad anyway unless she was throwing a dinner party. I suspect she hoped I'd marry a rich man and eat out a lot--live her dream ;-)

Luckily I learned to create some Italian dishes from my Jewish grandmother who married an Italian(!). I learned to make pan-fried hamburgers from one of my high school boyfriends. I learned to fix pancakes, scrambled eggs, and tuna salad from my father on weekends. I learned technique form watching Julia Child on TV. I learned from cookbooks and got recipes from friends. During the brief time I was on food stamps I got wonderful inexpensive recipes from the government, and I still make them--just fixed French lentil soup last night (with turkey broth I made from the Christmas carcase--I learned that from a food stamp booklet, too). I can honestly say I learned more about cooking and nutrition from the govt than from anyone else.

While I enjoy cooking and wanted to teach my kids, they weren't the least bit interested until they lived on their own. I gave them each a recipe box with their personal faves of my recipes when they graduated from college. They are prized, much-used possessions even today (they are in their mid-30s). Now we exchange recipes ;-)

So I wonder if the past of Moms (now parents) teaching girls (now all kids) to cook may be somewhat mythical.

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870058 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 9:33 AM
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So I wonder if the past of Moms (now parents) teaching girls (now all kids) to cook may be somewhat mythical.

I know someone who didn't learn to cook until after she was married. Her mother tried to teach her, and even more so after she was engaged, but she'd just sort of look and then wandered off somewhere.

She was from the Minnesota Iron Range, but for a couple of years had lived with her aunt's family in Seattle. So after she was married she called her aunt and asked what that pink horseshoe-shaped meat was.

Pacific salmon. Wild pacific salmon. (This was right after WWII). She had a lot to learn.

Nancy

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Author: GardenStateFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870062 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 10:07 AM
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So I wonder if the past of Moms (now parents) teaching girls (now all kids) to cook may be somewhat mythical.

My husband taught me how to cook. My SAHM did not then, nor does she now, know how to cook.

Yes, she can heat food. However, she usually does it in the least appetizing way possible. Health was my mother's ONLY goal growing up.

So, cooked vegetables were all steamed. No salt. No butter. No margarine. No other spices or flavorings at all. If there was a low-fat, no-fat, or generic version of something, she used that. Red meat was an extreme rarity, though she would frequently microwave (yes, microwave) fish.

My husband learned to cook from HIS mom, but it was generally very unhealthy stuff.

Between the two of us, we've managed to put together a decent repertoire of food we like to eat that isn't going to kill us too quickly.

And now my boys are learning to cook... from their father, who is much better at it than I am (on many things. I do have my few dishes, though).

GSF

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Author: legalwordwarrior Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870063 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 10:30 AM
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So I wonder if the past of Moms (now parents) teaching girls (now all kids) to cook may be somewhat mythical.

Maybe it's just the not eating out/having food delivered part that I'm thinking of. My mom always cooked at home, but she's what we refer to as a convenience cook. If the basics come out of a can or box, she can whip it up no problem. Cooking straight from scratch not so much. However, she did teach me quite a lot about how to throw things together in a pinch. My grandmother was an awesome cook. Unfortunately, while she did try to teach me how to make some of my favs, her recipes were pretty much all in her head. Everything was "put in a little of this and a pinch of that". When she died, those dishes died with her.

The kitchen I have now is referred to in our house as a two-butt kitchen. It's a galley style and can't really hold more than 2 people at once. The result is my kids dragging up chairs to the entrances and visiting with us while DH and I cook.

DD#1 has become a very accomplished cook, but she's running into opposition with my mom these days. "Why would you buy a package of cake flour and eggs when this nice mix is only a $1?"

When I had the kids over for Christmas this year I was somewhat surprised, but also pleased when my granddaughters announced that they don't really like potatoes (mashed or fried), but the youngest two do love sweet potatoes.

LWW

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Author: 2gifts Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870067 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 11:54 AM
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So I wonder if the past of Moms (now parents) teaching girls (now all kids) to cook may be somewhat mythical.

You folks are all making think I'm the exception, but my mother was a terrific cook, and she cooked from scratch for most things except for baking. She hated to bake, and had trouble even with a boxed cake mix.

She taught me to cook, and I love it. I also like to bake, and I even make more things from scratch than she did as I like to make my own jams in the summer. I have taught both DD and DS to cook, and they both love it, although DD really prefers baking. DS is even going to school to become a chef.

In our house, though, cooking is a family event and has been forever. The kids have fond memories of being in the kitchen when they were small, and nibbling on whatever I was cutting up until they started to help with the dinner prep.

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Author: sissylue Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870068 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 12:04 PM
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I think the whole point of the meal delivery system is that it's wholesome uber healthy food as opposed to out of a box food; and like other people pointed out the mom's teaching the girls (fergiddabout the boys) to cook might be largely a myth - and a huge percentage of those "home-cooked" meals were less than sterling. If you are in to vintage cookbooks try looking at some that were popular in the 50's and 60's (this obviously excludes the basics cookbooks like Joy and Julia Child which were cook from scratch recipes). The ingredients are dismal (and unintentionally funny). There was a brief period when EVERY recipe, no matter what it was, thought of some way to incorporate flavoured gelatin ... heavy on "convenience" and boxed foods.

Having said that I do try to cook wholesome healthy food from scratch with my kids. I have 2 favourite web sites I like to check in on:

http://www.100daysofrealfood.com/
One Hundered Days of Real Food

and

http://casualkitchen.blogspot.com/2009/10/25-best-laughably-...
Casual Kitchen

I have problems with one of my kids and I honestly think that it might be from her early childhood diet. I am entertaining this theory that you somehow program your body at a very early age as to what is acceptable food. So that if you eat crap at a very early age that will be the default yen that your body has when it comes to nutrition.

One of my children did not come to live with me until she was 8 almost 9. She apparently spent the first 8 years of her life subsisting on fast food and snack food. Literally. Retraining her to eat decent food has been an uphill battle and her default preference will always be fast food/snack food heavy on grease, salt, sugar and white flour. My other child came to live with me at 5 months. She loves food, any food, including junk food and sweets. However, unlike her older sister she has an extraordinarily sophisticated palate and is just as enthusiatic about greek olives and baby spinach with basalmic/raspberry dressing, or herb/parmesan encrusted salmon, as she is about a happy meal. Actually scratch the happy meal, she'd prefer the salmon as long as she can have the happy meal toy. I don't think the older girl will ever appreaciate really good food the way the younger one does although she is at least capable of eating it. But I think the early years of "food abuse" actually messed up something in her brain and rewired it so that she will always crave garbage food.

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Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870069 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 12:21 PM
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http://casualkitchen.blogspot.com/2009/10/25-best-laughably-......
Casual Kitchen


Ugghh ... any recipe that has beans in it uses canned beans. I guess that's what makes the recipes easy.

PSU
bean snob since 1902

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Author: Gingko100 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870073 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 12:37 PM
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I love Casual Kitchen (although they have diverted into non-recipe stuff the past year or so), but yeah - I always used from scratch beans, not canned.

Some excellent recipes I have found there:

http://casualkitchen.blogspot.com/2009/07/african-peanut-ste...
(I usually make this with garbanzos, not chicken)

http://casualkitchen.blogspot.com/2010/02/north-african-lemo...

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Author: alstroemeria Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870078 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 2:33 PM
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My mom always cooked at home, but she's what we refer to as a convenience cook.

I was shocked when I discovered that both of my husbands' mothers-- rural-oriented and conservative lifelong SAHMs--cooked with more convenience foods than my urban-oriented, liberal mother who worked. I used to call them "Women's Day" cooks (is that magazine still around?). The only canned soup in my mother's pantry was tomato for winter lunches. But other than trifle, which she made once for a dinner party, or fruit salad, my mother never fixed a dessert. (Not that it's a bad thing--sweets were only for parties...alas, both of my husbands were accustomed to daily sugary desserts...and it's hard to serve them without indulging myself :-/ DH made us banana splits for dessert last night, but the chocolate sauce was from scratch)

Cooking from scratch pretty much every day...good.
Cooking unhealthy food from scratch...not so good.
Steady diet of unhealthy takeout/restaurants...bad.
Steady diet of healthy takeout/restaurants...fine, if you can afford it.

=alstro, finally dragged my azz to the distant Asian grocery today, only to discover bugs in some of the food when I got home <aargh!> and the prices weren't as low as I remembered <sigh>, although I had a nice conversation with the proprietor, a man my age of Chinese descent whose parents emigrated to Vietnam and who himself emigrated from Vietnam in 1976 and has been a citizen since the 80s. Yes, he voted in November :-)

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Author: LOTROQueen Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870080 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 3:36 PM
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If you are in to vintage cookbooks try looking at some that were popular in the 50's and 60's (this obviously excludes the basics cookbooks like Joy and Julia Child which were cook from scratch recipes). The ingredients are dismal (and unintentionally funny). There was a brief period when EVERY recipe, no matter what it was, thought of some way to incorporate flavoured gelatin ... heavy on "convenience" and boxed foods.


Wonderful gallery of pictures and art accompanying those recipes here:
http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/

And this page has a list of ways to glorify flapjacks, including adding Spam to the batter:
http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/outdoors/5.html

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Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870082 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/3/2013 3:48 PM
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Wonderful gallery of pictures and art accompanying those recipes here:
http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/


Now you are making me hungry. I would like to track down two of the books.
http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/meat/index.html
http://lileks.com/institute/gallery/homecuring/index.html

Also some of the vegetable plates look good in the photos.

I inherited several 1950s era cookbooks from my grandmother. It was interesting to see how many of the recipes had lard as an ingredient.

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Author: TMFJeanie Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 870178 of 886165
Subject: Re: No Creamed Carrots Date: 1/5/2013 2:56 PM
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It was interesting to see how many of the recipes had lard as an ingredient.

Ah lard... I can still picture that blue box of lard that was a staple of my mom's baking. She made the best crescent rolls and pie crust in the world.

Over the past few years we've spent a winter month or so in Mexico, and the bakeries down there have the greatest croissants and pastry breads this side of France. One day I asked the proprietor of one of my favorite bakeries how his rolls were so light and tasty, and his secret?
Lard.

Makes me wonder if we've replaced the high-fat content of lard with preservatives and chemicals just to make us believe we're eating low-cal food.


Jeanie

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