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Author: RV2000 Two stars, 250 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 55906  
Subject: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/2/2005 6:41 PM
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TMF2Aruba - It's almost a sickness what Foodies obsess over.....I've been concerned I influenced you out of making your noodle pudding for Thanksgiving.

"Not acceptable. Need mashed potatoes. Noodle pudding in addition to sounds great!

rv
"

Did you do your noodle pudding?......can you share the recipe?

regards,

Rick
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Author: stevenjklein Big funky green star, 20000 posts Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40462 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/7/2005 5:09 PM
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I've never heard anyone use the term "noodle pudding," though I'm sure it's what I call luction kugel (Yiddish).

I've heard people call it "noodle kugel," but I've never heard of non-Jews eating it. My mom (and her mom) used to make it with wide egg noodles, raisins, and sometimes with farmers cheese.

As an adult, I found out about a style called Yerushalmi Kugel (Jerusalem pudding), and it's now my favorite. Here's a link to a typical recipe:
http://www.jewish-food.org/recipes/kugelj14.htm


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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40463 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/7/2005 5:44 PM
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I've heard people call it "noodle kugel," but I've never heard of non-Jews eating it.

We called it "noodle pudding". I'm not Jewish but Mom grew up in Williamsburg in Brooklyn so I guess that's why we ate it (and liked it!)

Christina

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40464 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/7/2005 6:52 PM
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I've heard people call it "noodle kugel," but I've never heard of non-Jews eating it. My mom (and her mom) used to make it with wide egg noodles, raisins, and sometimes with farmers cheese.

Steven,

The noodle pudding I spoke of making is indeed noodle kugel. It's made with wide egg noodles, cream cheese, egg, bread crumbs (on top, as well as sugar and cinnamon). A few other ingredients, but I don't have the recipe in front of me as I type.

The noodle "pudding" that my mom used to make was a different recipe that had wide egg noodles, raisins, sugar, cinnamon and apple pie filling.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: TchrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40465 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/7/2005 10:32 PM
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The noodle "pudding" that my mom used to make was a different recipe that had wide egg noodles, raisins, sugar, cinnamon and apple pie filling.

Here is one from my family that has prunes, not apple filling.

Prune and Noodle Pudding

1 large package broad noodles
1 pound prunes
1 cup sugar
1/2 pound butter
1 cup bread crumbs
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Cook prunes, pit, and reserve juice. Boil noodles and drain well. Butter a large casserole. Make a layer of noodles and cover with pitted prunes, sugar, cinnamon, and dots of butter. Repeat two more times. Reserve 1/4 pound butter. Melt, mix with bread crumbs. Cover top of pudding with crumbs. Pour prune juice over all. Bake in 325 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours.

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Author: zsimpson Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40467 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/8/2005 2:30 AM
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Prune and Noodle Pudding

1 large package broad noodles
1 pound prunes
1 cup sugar
1/2 pound butter
1 cup bread crumbs
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Cook prunes, pit, and reserve juice. Boil noodles and drain well. Butter a large casserole. Make a layer of noodles and cover with pitted prunes, sugar, cinnamon, and dots of butter. Repeat two more times. Reserve 1/4 pound butter. Melt, mix with bread crumbs. Cover top of pudding with crumbs. Pour prune juice over all. Bake in 325 degree oven for 1 1/2 hours.


I know this is probably a dumb quesiton, but how exactly do you cook the prunes? Are they boiled, or baked, or fried, or sauted, or what?
Kathleen
P.S. It sounds good.

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40470 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/8/2005 8:56 AM
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I know this is probably a dumb quesiton, but how exactly do you cook the prunes? Are they boiled, or baked, or fried, or sauted, or what?

When my mother used to make them for a breakfast fruit 60 or 50 years ago, she would put prunes and a few raisins in a pot, cover with water and simmer, covered, until plump and soft. ;-)

C.J.V. - can't tell you exactly how much water or how long to cook


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Author: TchrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40471 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/8/2005 10:25 AM
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how exactly do you cook the prunes?

This recipe is old enough to expect dried prunes (with, as is clear from the recipe, pits). You cook them by just covering them with tap water and simmering them gently until they are soft. Then you drain them, saving the liquid, and remove the pits.

It is now possible to buy pitted prunes that are already moist and soft, but for this recipe you would still need to simmer them in a little water, because the recipe rquires adding the cooking liquid.

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Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40472 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/8/2005 10:31 AM
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This recipe is old enough to expect dried prunes (with, as is clear from the recipe, pits). You cook them by just covering them with tap water and simmering them gently until they are soft. Then you drain them, saving the liquid, and remove the pits.

I was just about to post something similar. You don't really "cook" the prunes - even when they are dried. You are just rehydrating them, so to speak. You can use any liquid (for certain recipes, brandy is good!) and you should not boil them. Just simmer (as stated above) until they are plump and soft.

Christina

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Author: TchrP Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40473 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/8/2005 10:41 AM
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should not boil them. Just simmer (as stated above) until they are plump and soft.

In fact, sometimes people would just set them in water over the pilot light of a gas range overnight. This works well enough but is not ideal for this recipe, because the cooking liquid is more watery.

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Author: MitsouR Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 40504 of 55906
Subject: Re: Noodle Pudding Date: 12/12/2005 9:35 AM
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Here is my mom's recipe:

Noodle Kugel

3 eggs
2 cups milk
1 pint sour cream
1/4 lb melted butter
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 teaspoon cinammon
1/2 lb cottage cheese
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup raisins
Dash salt, dash of pepper

Cook pckg of broad noodles

Mix altogether....put in oblong baking dish, buttered

Sprinkle cinammon on top.

Bake at 350 degrees for one hour.

That's it. More cinammon, more sugar, pineapple instead of
raisins....up to you.

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