Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (15) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Author: MsVeeDub Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 7313  
Subject: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 6:51 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Hello!

I've gotten the idea into my head that now would be a fantastic time to begin quilting. I have some experience making basic clothing and slipcovers and such, so I understand basic terminology and own my own little sewing machine. I bought Rodale's Quiltmaking Tips & Techniques and have surfed many quilting websites. I haven't taken a quilting class yet, but plan to.

I've been so excited at the idea of making my very own quilt that I've already startd collecting fabric: all 100% cotton and nothing too lightweight. This leads me to a couple introductory questions:

1. Is there such a thing as a 100% cotton fabric that would not work for quiltmaking? I knw some fabrics are heavier than others, but if I stuck to the heaviest of the heavy I feel I'd be limited in my colors and prints.

2. To prewash or not to prewash? Disclaimer: I'm prewashing my fabrics as I type, heh.

3. Somehow I have the idea that it would be best to use 100% cotton thread and batting. Am I right? I've seen cotton-wrapped polyester thread....is that okay to use?

4. What is your favorite way of piecing? Hand-piecing or machine? Why?

5. Should I plan on using cotton batting? My first quilt will be a silly travel-oriented one to be used camping or in a car. I'm thinking of hand-tying it. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks for your replies!

Susan
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: MsVeeDub Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 7:04 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Humm, I've put out a few notices...time to move the wet prewash load to the dryer, make a margarita, sit back and see who drops in. :)

Susan

Print the post Back To Top
Author: CindyC72 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 5 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 7:06 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
I've gotten the idea into my head that now would be a fantastic time to begin quilting.

:-D I don't think there is a *bad* time to begin - however, I always seem to get the sewing bug in the fall when the weather starts to change.

This leads me to a couple introductory questions:

Digging into experience and "ok, what did Mom do???" on the questions that I can answer. (I first learned *very simple* quilting in school in the 3rd grade. Took it up again several years ago, but dropped it for stupid reasons and will probably look into again now that you've planted the idea in my head!)

2. To prewash or not to prewash? Disclaimer: I'm prewashing my fabrics as I type, heh.

I am a *big* fan of prewashing - get any potential shrinking/bleeding out of the way now rather than later.

4. What is your favorite way of piecing? Hand-piecing or machine? Why?

I like both. Hand piecing (to me at least!) is hard, but it's a very soothing project. Machine piecing is easier, and I have a better chance of getting the seams to come out straight. :)

5. Should I plan on using cotton batting? My first quilt will be a silly travel-oriented one to be used camping or in a car. I'm thinking of hand-tying it. Any thoughts or suggestions?

Can't comment on cotton v. polyester batting (seem to recall mom using polyester batting with no problems as far as being able to wash it, etc.), but as far as hand-tying it - go for it! Especially for a first go at it, getting it all pieced will be quite a challenge in and of itself. I remember at least one quilt my mom did that was tyed, and it looked great.

Cindy
...where are my scissors...

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: cosmos284 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 9 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 8:13 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
Susan, thanks for starting this board. I took up quilting last winter and would love to share info here.

1. Is there such a thing as a 100% cotton fabric that would not work for quiltmaking? I knw some fabrics are heavier than others

There is some discussion in the quilting community surrounding the quality of 100% cotten fabric. Most agree that the fabric from your LQS (local quilt shop) is a higher quality fabric. Most also agree that the same manufacturers make different quality fabrics, some for sale to chain stores like JoAnn's and a higher quality for LQS. Some say they want the best quality fabric they can buy because they put so much effort into the quilts. Others don't care. I have been buying fabric only from LQS, for now I'm sticking with the quality.

2. To prewash or not to prewash? Disclaimer: I'm prewashing my fabrics as I type, heh.

I prewash. If you don't, you may get a puckered look. And you can find out if the dye will run. I had prewashed my first batch in the machine, and machine dried. Then I bought a lot of fat quarterss and fat eighths when a LQS when out of business, and I found I got way too much raveling and spent a ton of time untangling the mess. The rest of the small pieces I hand washed, some machine dried and some I ironed dry.

Most things I've read say to wash the material just like you'd wash the final quilt..

3. Somehow I have the idea that it would be best to use 100% cotton thread and batting. Am I right? I've seen cotton-wrapped polyester thread....is that okay to use?

For piecing, it doesn't make a difference what type of thread you use, either kind you mentioned will work fine. Purists use 100% cotten. When quilting, it is important to use 100% cotten, the cotton-wrapped polyester is stronger than the cotton cloth and can put holes in the quilt. Some who do applique use 100% silk.

4. What is your favorite way of piecing? Hand-piecing or machine? Why?

So far I have only done machine piecing, but I'm a beginner. I aspire to make a Baby Jane www.dearjane.com/ quilt someday, and I think I would use a combination for that project, some of the squares would be much easier to hand piece.

5. Should I plan on using cotton batting?

100% cotton batting will result in a flat, more antique looking quilt. My LQS uses 80% cottton 20% polyester for most of its quilts, and that's what I bought for mine. 100% polyester will result in a puffier quilt. Make sure you prewash the the cotton/cotton blend batting, otherwise it will shrink and your quilt top will not.

Most LQS are sending out fall schedules right now, I know that 2 of them in my area are mailing them this week, so if you are thinking about taking a class this fall, sign up soon! They fill very quickly since the class sizes are small.

Have you checked out rec.crats.textiles.quilting? It's very busy and has tons of OT posts, but lots of info, too.

Good luck, and I look forward to this board.


Cosmos






Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: MsVeeDub Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 10 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 8:21 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Heyas Cosmos!

For piecing, it doesn't make a difference what type of thread you use, either kind you mentioned will work fine. Purists use 100% cotten. When quilting, it is important to use 100% cotten, the cotton-wrapped polyester is stronger than the cotton cloth and can put holes in the quilt. Some who do applique use 100% silk.

Another stupid question. Is cotton thread (mercerized cotton, the spool says) already "pre-shrunk" somehow? Not an issue?

Thanks!

Susan


Print the post Back To Top
Author: cosmos284 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 17 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 9:24 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Is cotton thread (mercerized cotton, the spool says) already "pre-shrunk" somehow? Not an issue?



I hope so! How in the world would you prewash thread?

Cosmos

Print the post Back To Top
Author: GlasMenagerie Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 25 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 10:15 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
1. Is there such a thing as a 100% cotton fabric that would not work for quiltmaking? I knw some fabrics are heavier than others, but if I stuck to the heaviest of the heavy I feel I'd be limited in my colors and prints.

Best quilt my mom made for me (for all of us really) was to take all the pairs of jeans that belonged to my father (some with horrid 70s styles to 'em) and to make a fully denim quilt. I still have it. When I got it however, her insertion of a layer of an extra layer of denim on some of the "Patches" made great pockets for my matchbox cars.

Oh yeah... and it was prewashed.

As to the piecing, she always went with hand-piecing, to my knowledge. She also looked at other quilts that had stood the test of time, and would always point out the quality of close, hand stitching as opposed to what can be achieved with a sewing machine.

Cheers,
Tim *Betcha didn't think I'D show up... just wait to we get to Cross-Stitch...*

Print the post Back To Top
Author: CindyC72 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 26 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 10:21 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Cheers,
Tim *Betcha didn't think I'D show up... just wait to we get to Cross-Stitch...*


Already did - check my post...

Which reminds me that I've got a Christmas cross-stitch around here that I need to get going on. As soon as I find it... (I saw it around the house here the other day, thought to myself, "You're never going to find it again if you leave it there." I was right...)

I *might* still have copies of two patterns I designed myself, but they may have gotten lost in the recent hard drive crash/reformat. Hmm, search project for the next few minutes.

Cindy

Print the post Back To Top
Author: KingMullet Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 30 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/7/2001 11:39 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
<<Thanks for your replies!>>

Hey VW. Seek out kanaredorah, she is the mistress of quilting. My no-better-than-novice responses:


<<1. Is there such a thing as a 100% cotton fabric that would not work for quiltmaking? I knw some fabrics are heavier than others, but if I stuck to the heaviest of the heavy I feel I'd be limited in my colors and prints.>>

I dunno. I use whatever I want.


<<3. Somehow I have the idea that it would be best to use 100% cotton thread and batting. Am I right? I've seen cotton-wrapped polyester thread....is that okay to use?>>

Depends on #4. Cotton threads can be testier in machines, although they look better. I'd say poly for piecing and cotton for quilting. Don't use the thread labeled for quilting in machines, it could be wax-coated which can gum up your machine.

<<4. What is your favorite way of piecing? Hand-piecing or machine? Why?>>

I'm all machine. My original ethos required me to sew all stitches at full throttle, but I've mellowed a bit.

<<5. Should I plan on using cotton batting? My first quilt will be a silly travel-oriented one to be used camping or in a car. I'm thinking of hand-tying it. Any thoughts or suggestions?>>

I find there isn't always that much selection. Most of what you find are blends.


Print the post Back To Top
Author: MsVeeDub Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 41 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/8/2001 8:53 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I hope so! How in the world would you prewash thread?


I dunno ;)

Print the post Back To Top
Author: Snowtrill Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 49 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/8/2001 10:29 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Good Morning,

I start quilting early this spring, then it got HOT so my squares are put up waiting for a cold front.

One tip that I learned on machine quilting is iron frequently. I iron almost after every time I attach a piece of material.

It enables you to get very sharp edges and you know very quickly if you have sewn crooked.

Most people don't believe these squares are my first ones, I believe the ironing I do is what makes the difference.

I started with a book that walks you through making 26 squares, by the time you are done you have a double size quilt and have learned quite a few methods of making blocks. I will find it tonight and post the title. It has great instructions and pictures.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: TMFRavynous Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 64 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/8/2001 3:15 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
I'm reading.

Let me get caught up. I'm on all boards well over 1000 posts behind, but that can't be helped. HOWEVER, I may curse you for opening a new board that has to be a fav at a time when I can't keep up with the other 30.

Rav

Sighes.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: TMFRavynous Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 65 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/8/2001 3:18 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
...where are my scissors...


Where's your rotary cutter?

Rav

Print the post Back To Top
Author: kanaredorah Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 70 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/8/2001 3:54 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3
Hi Ms VeeDub,

Thanks for inviting me. (Mullet - you sweet thang). Anytime is an excellent time to start quilting. There are many different types of quilting. I don't tend to quilt like most people. By all means - have fun and experiment. There are no correct answers to your questions. Cripes, I hope I don't get too long winded.

1. Is there such a thing as a 100% cotton fabric that would not work for quiltmaking? I knw some fabrics are heavier than others, but if I stuck to the heaviest of the heavy I feel I'd be limited in my colors and prints.

Any 100% cotton will work for quiltmaking. Cotton is generally used because it is fairly strong and easy to quilt. If you are handquilting, very heavy fabric makes it difficult.

2. To prewash or not to prewash? Disclaimer: I'm prewashing my fabrics as I type, heh.

Although most quilters prewash, I do not. I wait until the entire piece is finished (Hobbs 100% cotton batting only) and then handwash and dry the piece.

3. Somehow I have the idea that it would be best to use 100% cotton thread and batting. Am I right? I've seen cotton-wrapped polyester thread....is that okay to use?

I use inexpensive cotton/poly for piecing and any dang thread I happen to like (color, texture or pizazz) for quilting. I tend to quilt excessively and I love metallic thread even though it is a bear to work with.

What is your favorite way of piecing? Hand-piecing or machine? Why?

I machine piece, hand piece, and applique a lot. Straight seams can be machine stiched for strength. I find that appliqueing circular or free motion seams occasionally warrants hand stiching. How do you spell stich? Cripes.


ellen










Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: EllenE Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 88 of 7313
Subject: Re: Novice quilter questions Date: 8/8/2001 9:44 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Susan,

I'm not a quilter, but as a sewer (and the granddaughter of a quilter) I can give my two cents on a couple questions...

1. Is there such a thing as a 100% cotton fabric that would not work for quiltmaking? I knw some fabrics are heavier than others, but if I stuck to the heaviest of the heavy I feel I'd be limited in my colors and prints.

I've seen quilts made in anything and everything...from denim to corduroy to nuclear-proof polyester doubleknit (those things will still be around after the apocalypse!) to velvet and satin (classy!) Whatever you use, do try to keep your fabrics (at least for the top) the same content and weight.

2. To prewash or not to prewash? Disclaimer: I'm prewashing my fabrics as I type, heh.

Definitely prewash. Actually, you're preshrinking--very important if you want to wash your quilt after it's made. Fabrics shrink differently--even fabrics of the same content, which would make for a rather puckered quilt. (I made some reversible placemats a while back--different fabrics, but same content, on each side--but forgot to preshrink the fabric. After I used them and washed them, one side shrunk more than the other. Now they don't lie flat!)


Good luck on your first quilt!

Ellen


Print the post Back To Top
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (15) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Advertisement