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2828 suggested in an earlier post that I raise a retirement topic, if that's what I want to discuss. Maybe he/she's right, so here goes ...

Besides Options, I'm evaluating MF Hidden Gems. I have about 35% of my portfolio in small caps and all of this, with the exception of a single small position, is split between IWN and IWO. (These are small cap value and growth stock ETF's, respectively.)

I used ETF's for my US small cap asset allocation both to diversify away as much risk as I could, and to save time studying stocks. Though IWO and IWN have done very well over the last decade or so, tracking their indeces admirably, I think I'm ready to do a little more work, take a little more rick, and shoot for slightly better returns.

The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class.

Thoughts? Trey
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Thoughts?

I don't have much to invest after I make my IRA contributions for the year. Personal economics have not been kind to me after I got laid off from the oil patch in 2009. Any investable funds I have go into DRIPs on the tax side.
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The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class.

Thoughts? Trey
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20-30 positions seems like alot. They say you should follow your positions closely and read all the earnings reports and conference call questions. I think with that many positions it would be tough. And that is just small caps? Would there be 20-30 mid caps and large caps too?

I probably own too many stocks myself, i read the news on them, especially when they're up big or down big, but i probably should follow closer. I only read earnings reports of stocks i'm worried about or am actively accumulating. I mostly own large cap companies.
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20-30 positions seems like alot

Agreed. In the past two years I dropped from 17 DRIPs to 11 for that very reason.
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20-30 positions seems like alot

Agreed. In the past two years I dropped from 17 DRIPs to 11 for that very reason.
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Sometimes it's through no fault of your own. Take MO for example, i know you own it too. MO split into MO and PM, then Kraft was spun off, and then Kraft split into Kraft North America and Mondolez.
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I agree, too, for exactly that reason. Twenty positions within one or two asset classes seems pretty unwieldy unless you want to spend all you time keeping track of the companies and industries.

No matter what, I'll shift slowly. Research takes time and I'll need to manage my capital gains tax bill carefully as/if I ease out of the ETF's. I suppose that in itself will limit risk, since I'll still be holding ETF positions for several years.

Wolverine, are you dripping into a mix of large and small cap stocks? Or more to the point, are you pretty conscious about following an asset allocation strategy across your portfolio? In my opinion, drippings a great way to force reinvesment and dollar-cost average. But, there's as much, maybe more, opportunity in sensible asset allocation.
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Wolverine, are you dripping into a mix of large and small cap stocks? Or more to the point, are you pretty conscious about following an asset allocation strategy across your portfolio? In my opinion, drippings a great way to force reinvesment and dollar-cost average. But, there's as much, maybe more, opportunity in sensible asset allocation.
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I never dripped but i did use to reinvest my dividends but i stopped doing that. I didn't like reinvesting in some companies and like the freedom of collecting the money and targeting the investment to the company which i find the most intriguing at the current time.
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Wolverine, are you dripping into a mix of large and small cap stocks?

Large caps. The only less-than-large cap I have is Lancaster Colony. The rest of very familiar names. My thought process being that I have a job that is physically demanding, and at age 56 (less than two months) an unplanned early retirement is always right around the corner. If that sad event were to happen, I'd need current income to survive. I am also a military retiree, so I get a check every month from Uncle Sam.

Between the two streams I get $20K a year. Hardly a king's ransom, but enough to survive on for one person.
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Trey:""Besides Options, I'm evaluating MF Hidden Gems. I have about 35% of my portfolio in small caps and all of this, with the exception of a single small position, is split between IWN and IWO. (These are small cap value and growth stock ETF's, respectively.)"


You're too busy micromanaging things.

I'd go to the Scott Burns site and read up on the Couch Potato portfolio. You can expand that to six ways if you want with the follow up. or now he is up to 10 ways.

http://assetbuilder.com/couch_potato/couch_potato_cookbook

Index funds...index funds....minimize risk. STAY away from funds with high costs.

35% in small caps? OUch!

-------



trey:"I used ETF's for my US small cap asset allocation both to diversify away as much risk as I could, and to save time studying stocks."

Good move. Now, how old are you and how risk averse are you? You got any money in TIPS? or other bonds?

------


trey:" Though IWO and IWN have done very well over the last decade or so, tracking their indeces admirably, I think I'm ready to do a little more work, take a little more rick, and shoot for slightly better returns."

or, more losses.

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trey:"The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class."

You going to wake up every morning and read the stock news for each of your 30 positions? to make sure no 'bomb' went off over night? ANd then read it again at noon, and in the evening? You actually going to read and understand the annual reports and the notes at the back that really explain what is going on? That can take 10 hours or more per stock to decipher.

------

Keep it simple.

Depending how close to retirement you are.....affects a lot of your choices.

The best way to retire early is to SAVE SAVE SAVE and live below your means...constantly......

t.
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The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class.

Thoughts? Trey

>>>>>>>>>>>

I think it depends on total amount of your portfolio, your time and inclination to manage it as well.

I have a lot of stocks and I have complained off and on over the yrs about it and wanting to pare things down. It never gets that way. I'm all for income and growth stocks so I have all sorts of things in there. I have a few losing positions but I'm holding on for now. I also have mutual funds that I set up a long time ago at Vanguard...I've made some changes over the yrs as well. I'm not a churner nor am I a nervous nelly as far as selling when the bad winds blow. They go up and they go down....the permanent down's are the ones I want to stay away from.

There's no right answer, it's up to the individual.

LuckyDog


btw I just read about SM...small fry oil and gas company, I'm intrigued....but haven't done more research so do your own. :)
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tele:You're too busy micromanaging things.

I'd go to the Scott Burns site and read up on the Couch Potato portfolio.


or Paul Farrell's lazy portfolios:http://www.marketwatch.com/lazyportfolio

And since you like small caps:http://www.marketwatch.com/lazyportfolio/portfolio/bernstein...
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Besides Options, I'm evaluating MF Hidden Gems.

The Motley Fool was founded upon not taking the advice of experts and doing your own due dilligence. Then they changed and became the very fools they used to criticize and now they want to rely on their expert advice.

If you want to turn the decision making over to someone else, there are probably better places than TMF.
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Thoughts? Trey

I think I'm ready to do a little more work, take a little more rick, and shoot for slightly better returns.

Here are some thoughts more to do with risk and return rather than stocks.

--nobody knows their true risk tolerance until they live through it. Everyone sees 30% CAGR with a 50% GSD and thinks they can handle it. Until they hit that year of 20% down followed by another year of 20% down, and they lost all their gains from the previous 5 years. Remember talk of the "lost decade" from the S&P500?

--have a timeline cushion running into retirement. Have 5 years of living expenses in CDs/fixed income when you start getting close or the idea of retirement seems tempting. The last thing you want to do is plan to retire next month only to have the market crash tomorrow and resetting your date 2 more years into the future.

--while chicks may dig the long ball, you can get into the Hall of Fame buy hitting a bunch of singles and doubles. You also don't have to be great to get into the HOF, just good for a long period of time.

--disability insurance, do you have enough to cover living expenses and then some. That's probably the biggest risk you face everyday.

JLC
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"The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class. Thoughts?" - Trey
---------------


All my money is in index funds (60%) and bond funds (~40%). I started taking 72(t)SEPP distributions when I was 52 and finished up my 72(t) mandatory distributions last year when I turned 59 1/2 years old. My IRA account grew by about ~$20,000 during that time plus I got to take a single annual distribution each year to live on.

Oh yeah, the index funds are like large cap, mid cap, small cap, plus a little bit is in international funds.

I don't buy individual stocks. My wife bought some McDonald's stock years ago and it has grown a lot, like I think she originally bought like $1,600 worth of McDonald's and now it's worth like $16,000 or something. It's split a whole bunch of times. My wife is a whole lot smarter and richer than I am.

That is all.

Art
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"20-30 positions seems like alot. They say you should follow your positions closely and read all the earnings reports and conference call questions. I think with that many positions it would be tough. And that is just small caps? Would there be 20-30 mid caps and large caps too?

I probably own too many stocks myself, i read the news on them, especially when they're up big or down big, but i probably should follow closer. I only read earnings reports of stocks i'm worried about or am actively accumulating. I mostly own large cap companies." - 2828

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What I don't understand is why don't ya'll just put your money in index funds and not worry about it? Just leave it there and let it grow? What is the allure of owning individual stocks? Is there some kind of income tax advantage that I don't understand?

Art, "dumb and lazy"
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I completely agree. I invested through the lost decade and did quite well - on the backs of US small caps, emerging markets, and bond CEF's.

Since I retired in 2007, I've already been through a horrendous downturn while being off payroll. It was a good gut check, but I stayed almost fully invested and am worth much more now than when I retired.

As you suggest, the key for getting through (with a daughter in college, a son getting close, and a wife) was having more than three years' "salary" in cash. We lived largely off of dividends, but the cash helped me sleep.

Trey
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If you want to turn the decision making over to someone else, there are probably better places than TMF.
---------------

DH will have nothing to do with TMF. He thinks they're hucksters. He has them blocked when he looks at stuff on Yahoo, because they have no useful info. He bought Microsoft in 1987. Just sayin'.

arrete
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"Sometimes it's through no fault of your own. Take MO for example, i know you own it too. MO split into MO and PM, then Kraft was spun off, and then Kraft split into Kraft North America and Mondolez." - 2828


Are you talking about Kraft foods? I used to work for them in Decatur, Georgia stacking boxes and driving a fork lift. They make good mayonnaise and salad dressings and cheese. Working for Kraft Foods helped me pay my tuition at The University of Georgia.

Art
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"I am also a military retiree, so I get a check every month from Uncle Sam. Between the two streams I get $20K a year. Hardly a king's ransom, but enough to survive on for one person." - wolverine


Hey wolverine, I was wondering - when You turn 62 will you be able to collect some social security income also? If so the sum total of your social security + military retiree pension might be enough to have a decent life on? Especially if you add whatever you can generate from your savings and investments?

Art
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2828:

Here's your chart on Lloyd's. Yuck.

http://caps.fool.com/Ticker/LYG/Chart.aspx?source=icasittab0...


Take MO for example, i know you own it too. MO split into MO and PM, then Kraft was spun off, and then Kraft split into Kraft North America and Mondolez.

I hear ya. Most of my reduction has been of financial stocks: HRB, BA, BPOP, and STI. I bought STI because at the time they had an ungodly amount of KO stock. They were the ones who took Coke public in 1919. They took their commission in stock. They sold it to meet cash requirements after the 2008-09 meltdown.

BPOP was my play on the Hispanic market in America, but I don't wanna wait around forever to recoup my losses.

I also off-loaded FDX and MKC. MKC got the axe because I had too many food-type stocks with the spin-offs you mentioned.
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What I don't understand is why don't y'all just put your money in index funds and not worry about it? Just leave it there and let it grow?

One could do the same thing in an Index Universal Life policy...

~AND~ your principal would be guaranteed against loss;
~AND~ your gains would be taken off the table and likewise guaranteed against loss;
~AND~ your beneficiaries would get a nice big payoff when you finally do kick the bucket--many more times what you paid in;
~AND~ the money you withdraw would be tax-free.

Caveat: your upside is limited to 17% annual gains.
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I'm 54, retired at 48.

My asset allocation model has 8 asset classes. I have almost nothing in mutual funds. Today, I populate all the asset classes except large caps with either ETF's (various equity categories) or CEF's (for bonds). There are some exceptions, but this is close.

Using an asset allocation model with ETF's and CEF's is extremely simple to manage. And it's worked well for the last, say, 13 or so years.

But, I enjoy studying companies and their business models and think I'm ready to do some small cap selection myself. As I said earlier, it will be a gradual process. In the end, I may underperform the small cap indeces/ETF's. Or maybe not. I'll take the risk.

Also, I absolute don't abrogate responsibility for selection. I'll use Hidden Gems and other sources for seed ideas and first-cut analysis. Stupid decisions will be mine, though, not theirs.

Thanks for the comments! Trey
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I was wondering - when You turn 62 will you be able to collect some social security income also? If so the sum total of your social security + military retiree pension might be enough to have a decent life on? Especially if you add whatever you can generate from your savings and investments?

I'm figuring that by then there will be some kind of means testing and I'll take a haircut due to being a double-dipper. Something has to happen.

Tomorrow, I'm gonna plop another grand into my IRA. That'll bring me to $110,000, plus the other stuff I mentioned. While I know that pales in comparison to what most of y'all have done, I wasn't as bright/mature as many of you and I paid what Dave Ramsey calls "The Stupid Tax."

Bear in mind, however, at age 40 I was literally penniless (except for my pension). Everything you read about has been accumulated in a little less than 16 years, plus being a single parent, plus having no real marketable job skills in MI.

I am also debt-free.
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Hi, Art,

Excellent question. For me:

1. There has absolutely been a tax advantage to having individual stocks. During the downturn, I selectively "harvested capital losses" to offset gains, then reinvested in other companies I thought had similar potential. This isn't always (or even normally) a great idea, but has worked well for me around the edges of the portfolio.

2. I often enjoy reading about companies and their businesses. I truly look forward to Buffett's Berkshire letter every year, for instance.

3. I think my large cap assets, which are all individual stocks, have outperformed the S&P. Because I only track performance of the whole portfolio, though, I can't at this moment say the definitively. My bad.

So, yeah, individual stock selection isn't for everybody. Trey
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"But, I enjoy studying companies and their business models and think I'm ready to do some small cap selection myself." - Trey


Oh! That explains it. I enjoy studying near death experiences, death bed visions, and the holographic universe, and quantum physics and that is why I just leave my money in index funds and leave it alone.

Studying companies and watching what they do would cause a great pain between my ears. Like tonight I'm looking forward to watching Downton Abbey on PBS with my wife.

Art
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"I am also debt-free." - wolverine


That seems to be a real biggy when it comes to retirement. Very important. In fact I'd venture to say that those people who have debt will be the ones that will have to put off their retirement till they get their finances straightened out.

Sounds to me like you are doing okay. I think you are going to make it. And I also believe you will get some kind of social security. It may not be a whole lot but it will be something. Even $200/month is better than nothing? It will buy you groceries?

Art
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"Hi, Art, Excellent question. For me:
1. There has absolutely been a tax advantage to having individual stocks. During the downturn, I selectively "harvested capital losses" to offset gains, then reinvested in other companies I thought had similar potential. This isn't always (or even normally) a great idea, but has worked well for me around the edges of the portfolio." - Trey

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I'm going to be honest here and say that I don't know what that means? I don't have a clue what "selectively harvested capital losses" means?

And then intentionally reinvested in other companies you were going to lose money on? Is that what you said? Why would anyone want to do that?

Or am I totally confused (which I think I am)?

Art
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OK, Art. You're right. Reading about Google or Chipotle totally sucks compared to the Copenhagen interpretation, or news about the Higgs boson, or hints at what dark energy may be. But I never seem to make any money reading about quantum physics.

I've only seen the first episode of Downton Abbey, so I'll reserve judgment on that.

Trey
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"OK, Art. You're right. Reading about Google or Chipotle totally sucks compared to the Copenhagen interpretation, or news about the Higgs boson, or hints at what dark energy may be. But I never seem to make any money reading about quantum physics.

I've only seen the first episode of Downton Abbey, so I'll reserve judgment on that." - Trey

----------------------------


Also you may not have a wife who has a PhD and is a department head at a University.

That helps too. It makes my life a whole lot easier.

Art
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Art,

Sorry for the confusion about harvesting losses. The idea is this: In the last quarter of the year, I assess my tax position, especially my capital gains position.

In order to minimize excess gains (those taxed at >15% rate) I might sell shares of investments in the red. I "harvest" the loss to offset realized gains in other investments. Then, I re-invest the proceeds in a different stock or fund (but one I believe is worthy).

I certainly never sold shares in a good company to buy shares in an inferior company. At least not on purpose!

Trey
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My apologies in thinking you were a troll, you obviously are not. I've seen too many PA types pretend to be someone else. Good luck in your investing. Myself, I've gone through the day trader routine many moons ago and didn't do much better than I would have done by indexing. So now I have a well diversified portfolio and rebalance when certain balances in my funds reach a predetermined profit and buy back in when they are off of their highs and reach a predetermined loss. In doing so, I typically beat the market even with a 60% stock 40% bond allocation.
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"One could do the same thing in an Index Universal Life policy...

~AND~ your principal would be guaranteed against loss;
~AND~ your gains would be taken off the table and likewise guaranteed against loss;
~AND~ your beneficiaries would get a nice big payoff when you finally do kick the bucket--many more times what you paid in;
~AND~ the money you withdraw would be tax-free.

Caveat: your upside is limited to 17% annual gains."


I suspect if you back test this, and see the years where the stock market doubled, you'd see how bad a deal any Life insurance vehicle is!


Most of the market gains have occurred in spurts...down one year, the recoup the loss and add more.

By limiting yourself to 17% gain, you take it in the shorts when the market drops and starts out the year low, then it regains the 30% it lost the next year.

CC is still pushing 'life insurance' stuff.

Even Suze Orman won't go near the stuff.


t.
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Not too bad for a Michigan fan.
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" I don't have a clue what "selectively harvested capital losses" means? "

- - - -- -
It means he didn't do too well and some of the stock he bought went down.

So he is selling it at a loss......to offset gains on some other stocks he bought and went up and he wants to sell now..... or , when you have mutual funds, they spin off long and short term gains - some more than others.


t
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I suspect if you back test this, and see the years where the stock market doubled, you'd see how bad a deal any Life insurance vehicle is!

If you can retain those gains, that's probably true. Here's my stock market seminar. It consists of a single slide.

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=stock+market+gains+and+losses...
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"The idea is this: In the last quarter of the year, I assess my tax position, especially my capital gains position. In order to minimize excess gains (those taxed at >15% rate) I might sell shares of investments in the red. I "harvest" the loss to offset realized gains in other investments. Then, I re-invest the proceeds in a different stock or fund (but one I believe is worthy). I certainly never sold shares in a good company to buy shares in an inferior company. At least not on purpose!" - Trey
----------------


Yeah, that's way too complicated for me. You sell your losers and somehow that helps you save money on your winners? So you don't have to pay over 15% in taxes?

I think I better stick to index funds. So far that is working pretty good for me. Your way sounds way too complicated for this fat old Tennessee Hillbilly.

We are up to about a million bucks in savings and investment and we have no debt. Our house and cars are paid for. I figure with that and what we we'll get in social security we aren't going to end up living in a dumpster.

Art
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Bear in mind, however, at age 40 I was literally penniless (except for my pension). Everything you read about has been accumulated in a little less than 16 years, plus being a single parent, plus having no real marketable job skills in MI. I am also debt-free.

I salute you, sir.
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"Myself, I've gone through the day trader routine many moons ago and didn't do much better than I would have done by indexing. So now I have a well diversified portfolio and rebalance when certain balances in my funds reach a predetermined profit and buy back in when they are off of their highs and reach a predetermined loss. In doing so, I typically beat the market even with a 60% stock 40% bond allocation." - Josh
------------


That reminds me I think we got like 15% in Nasdaq funds too? We slowly got back into that. We were pretty heavily into techie stuff in the 1990's. We had a large chunk of change in IPSfunds.com. Whew! That was scary! Luckily we got out of that before March, 2001.

Art
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You're reading quantum physics and managing capital gains is too complicated!?

"Fat old Tennessee Hillbilly." You crack me up. They don't watch Downton Abbey in Tennessee. Or so I heard.
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You're reading quantum physics

Reading and understanding are two different things. Very few people, without extended and extensive advanced study, actually understand quantum physics.
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You sell your losers and somehow that helps you save money on your winners? So you don't have to pay over 15% in taxes?

It's like this.

You believe the global-warming hype and see an upcoming investment opportunity. The Mediterranean is going to be so overly warm nobody goes there, so you sell-short a beach resort in Italy; meanwhile the northern regions are going to warm up nicely, so you invest in some beach resort property in Greenland.

Well, Italy has an economic crisis plus an earthquake severely damages the beach resort right at the start of tourist season. And they had stupidly let their insurance lapse. The company is WIPED OUT, a complete loss - which, since you shorted it, is a complete win for you. You have a large realized capital gain that you're going to have to pay income tax on.

But it turns out that you're a mite early on your Greenland beach resort plans, and the property is now worth quite a bit less than you paid for it. On the other hand, you still believe in the concept.

So you can sell the Greenland beach resort property and suffer that loss - offsetting the profit you made by shorting the Italian resort. So you pay less income tax, possibly none at all. And you use the proceeds from selling that Greenland beach resort property to buy the property next door to it which also declined in value; so essentially you're trading in one Greenland property for a different but very similar Greenland property, and reducing your income-tax bill in the process.

(Note: I do not recommend any of the specific investments mentioned in this entirely-made-up example.)
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"You're reading quantum physics and managing capital gains is too complicated!?" - Trey
-----------

Popular Physics books like Dr. Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe, Fabric of the Cosmos, and The Hidden Reality and Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time, Paul Davie's God and The New Physics, Michael Talbot's Mysticism and the New Physics and Beyond the Quantum and The Holographic Universe, and Dr. Fred Alan Wolf's The Spiritual Universe, Cosmic Coincidences by John Gribbin and Martin Rees, and The Tao of Physics by Fritjof Capra

----

""Fat old Tennessee Hillbilly." You crack me up. They don't watch Downton Abbey in Tennessee. Or so I heard." - Trey

Oh it's huge here, huge I say! My wife loves Dowton Abbey and so does one of her best friends that lives in Franklin. So does my sister Linda that lives in Georgia.
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"Reading and understanding are two different things. Very few people, without extended and extensive advanced study, actually understand quantum physics." - Catherine


Catherine you have no idea what I know or understand. I have over 300 hours of college credits, more than a hundred of them graduate credit hours. I had a double major in undergraduate school, Animal Science and Education. The whole 17 years I was working at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine I was allowed to take up to 8 semester hours free every semester. I fully took advantage of that benefit. I am also an AALAS Certified Laboratory Animal Technologist.

Art
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Catherine you have no idea what I know or understand. I have over 300 hours of college credits, more than a hundred of them graduate credit hours. I had a double major in undergraduate school, Animal Science and Education. The whole 17 years I was working at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine I was allowed to take up to 8 semester hours free every semester. I fully took advantage of that benefit. I am also an AALAS Certified Laboratory Animal Technologist.

Quantum physics and popular physics are two different things.

http://physicsandphysicists.blogspot.com/2007/04/no-one-unde...

The issue here is what is meant by the word "understand". In physics, and among physicists, we usually consider something to be "fully understood" when it has reached a universal consensus that this is the most valid description of a phenomenon. We say that we understand Newton's Laws because it is well-tested and we know that it definitely work within a certainly range of condition. No one would question their use when building a house, for example. The same can be said about superconductivity before 1986. The BCS theory was so successful that it was of general consensus that the field has fully reached maturity and that we know all there is to know about it. The only thing left is simply added complexity to slightly tweak our understanding here and there. So one can say at that time that we have understood conventional superconductivity.

So in physics, the criteria to say that we understand something is very, very strict. It requires a well-verified theory that matches practically all of the empirical observations, and a general consensus among experts in the field that agree with it. This means that in many instances, physicists would tend to say that we don't understand so-and-so, because there are many areas of physics that haven't been fully answered, verified, or have reached a general consensus. To us, this does not allow us to say that we have understood it. But it certainly does not mean we know NOTHING about it.


I'm not saying you, Art, know nothing about physics. I'm sure you know more than me. I just seriously doubt that with your background in Animal Science and Education, you understand very much at all about quantum physics. You just don't have the necessary background.
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warrl jokes, "(Note: I do not recommend any of the specific investments mentioned in this entirely-made-up example.)"


I read your post about shorting and selling Italy and Greenland. All that sounds way too complicated to me. I'm going to stick to index funds thank you very much. Way simpler. So far for me it's working.

Art
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"I'm not saying you, Art, know nothing about physics. I'm sure you know more than me. I just seriously doubt that with your background in Animal Science and Education, you understand very much at all about quantum physics. You just don't have the necessary background." - Catherine
----------------


And you don't know what I know. Impugning what a person thinks or feels or knows? It's no wonder you aren't married, or couldn't stay married if you ever were.

Art
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warrl jokes, "(Note: I do not recommend any of the specific investments mentioned in this entirely-made-up example.)"

That sentence was at least 75% serious.

I'd say 100%, except that I strongly suspect (and certainly hope) it wasn't really necessary.
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Art, what does what you think or feel have to do with whether you're a quantum physicist? Obviously, you're not. And what does whether I'm married or not have to do with your lack of credentials? C'mon, man.

Here's a list of 122 internationally known quantum physicists.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Quantum_physicists

Let's examine the credentials of just one of them: Christian_Møller, a Danish chemist and physicist who made fundamental contributions to the theory of relativity, theory of gravitation and quantum chemistry. He's known for the Møller–Plesset perturbation theory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Møller

Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP) is one of several quantum chemistry post-Hartree–Fock ab initio methods in the field of computational chemistry. It improves on the Hartree–Fock method by adding electron correlation effects by means of Rayleigh–Schrödinger perturbation theory (RS-PT), usually to second (MP2), third (MP3) or fourth (MP4) order. Its main idea was published as early as 1934 by Christian Møller and Milton S. Plesset.

Here's the formula:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Møller–Plesset_perturbatio...

Art, do you have any idea whatsoever what Dr. Møller is talking about?

I thought not. And besides, what does it matter? Why must everyone on this board think you understand quantum physics? Obviously, you don't, so what's the point?
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It's no wonder you aren't married, or couldn't stay married if you ever were.

Why the focus on her marital status when you get tired of her badgering you? Why are you trying to be hurtful? Marriages fail for a variety of reasons, not all of them under the full control of the individuals involved. This may be a painful topic in her life that she'd rather not have some internet stranger throw back at her when the discussion doesn't go your way.

I'm not married and haven't been since 1996. And I think that I'm a good person. Things happen.
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Why must everyone on this board think you understand quantum physics? Obviously, you don't, so what's the point?

There's different levels of understanding. When quantam physics is laid out in layman's terms, Art probably gets it. It is when folks start with the deep calculus, like the good doctor, that it loses 99.99% of the people.
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It's no wonder you aren't married, or couldn't stay married if you ever were.
art
>>>>>>

Why the focus on her marital status when you get tired of her badgering you? Why are you trying to be hurtful? Marriages fail for a variety of reasons, not all of them under the full control of the individuals involved. This may be a painful topic in her life that she'd rather not have some internet stranger throw back at her when the discussion doesn't go your way.

I'm not married and haven't been since 1996. And I think that I'm a good person. Things happen.
wolvie

>>>>>>>>>>

I'm not either, never been married, although I was twice engaged, first one with a man, and second with a woman. I'm a two-fer but still unmarried and a good person to my dogs and kitties. :)

And I must add, this is painful topic for me.

LD
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"Why the focus on her marital status when you get tired of her badgering you? Why are you trying to be hurtful? Marriages fail for a variety of reasons, not all of them under the full control of the individuals involved. This may be a painful topic in her life that she'd rather not have some internet stranger throw back at her when the discussion doesn't go your way.

I'm not married and haven't been since 1996. And I think that I'm a good person. Things happen." - wolverine

-----------------


Because she drives me crazy and I wonder sometimes if I was married to her how I'd be running around the house stark raving made. Seriously, she drives me insane.

I can't figure out why I keep letting her out of my P-box! Seriously, I need to put her in there and throw away the key!

Art
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"And I must add, this is painful topic for me." - LD


That's probably why I made the jab I did. CC drives me crazy. I need to quit reading her posts. Seriously. I'm not emotionally strong enough to do battle with her.

Art
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Why the focus on her marital status when you get tired of her badgering you?

As Art knows, my marital status has nothing to do with anything, but it's not painful to discuss.

Now the product of that marriage, and his descent into liberalism...that's painful. * sigh *
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When quantam physics is laid out in layman's terms, Art probably gets it.

On that basis, I get it, too. ;-)
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Now the product of that marriage, and his descent into liberalism...that's painful. * sigh *


Not to worry:

“If you're not a liberal at twenty you have no heart, if you're not a conservative at forty you have no brain.”
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Because she drives me crazy and I wonder sometimes if I was married to her how I'd be running around the house stark raving made. Seriously, she drives me insane.

Obviously, your wife lets what you believe go in one ear and out the other. I think you should ponder why someone who doesn't drives you insane--particularly on this, a discussion board, where (duh) discussion occurs fairly routinely.

As the founder of a potential new religion, you should be able to defend your theory without being driven insane by anyone who asks questions and challenges what you believe.
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That's probably why I made the jab I did. CC drives me crazy. I need to quit reading her posts. Seriously. I'm not emotionally strong enough to do battle with her.

Art: I know quite a bit about quantum physics.

CC: Really? Have you completed advanced studies in physics?

Art: I have a degree in animal husbandry and 300 hours of post-graduate work.

CC: I see. So you think that qualifies you to pontificate about quantum physics.

Art: Yes, I do.

It is I who need emotional strength for such conversations. ;-)
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Because she drives me crazy and I wonder sometimes if I was married to her how I'd be running around the house stark raving made. Seriously, she drives me insane.

But you're not married to her.

You would have loved raising my DD. As you know, I was a single parent. I had no female partner to help me on the front lines. I used to think of DD as a yapping little Chihuahua. When on a roll she just wouldn't shut up. At least with my ex, I would ask her to give me the silent treatment and she got the hint and gave me peace until my psychic batteries were recharged.

The female verbal war chest and bank account is much superior to ours. When our cup runneth over we shut down, whereas they have a half tank left.


I can't figure out why I keep letting her out of my P-box! Seriously, I need to put her in there and throw away the key!

The more painful the impression, the more powerful the lesson. Education of the soul is too important to be left to chance :).

Seriously, if that's how you feel, then you should just p-box her and move on. I use the p-box so quickly and so often because I know that if I interact with certain types of people it is just going to lead to an argumnet, and few people come here to read me arguing with someone.

I learned the hard way, after many years of being slow on the uptake, that the only argument I win is the one I don't have.
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Seriously. I'm not emotionally strong enough to do battle with her.

I don't think of it those terms. I think of it as just two different styles of communication. I have grown used to it over the years. Like I said, I got a FT dose of it raising my kid. You develop survival strategies when under those conditions day-after-day.
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The more painful the impression, the more powerful the lesson. Education of the soul is too important to be left to chance. :)

What a riot!
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CC, I believe you could argue your way out of a paper bag and still have a good time. Sometimes enough is enough.

LD
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CC drives me crazy.

Then stop drinking or add 7-UP to it.
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CC, I believe you could argue your way out of a paper bag and still have a good time. Sometimes enough is enough.

You're right. We should all let Art believe he's a quantum physicist and the founder of a new religion who will be remembered for 300 years. ;-)

For dinner tonight, I'm having spaghetti and a crisp green salad with Kalamata olives, dressed with flaxseed oil.
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For dinner tonight, I'm having spaghetti and a crisp green salad with Kalamata olives, dressed with flaxseed oil.
--------------------

I'm making cod, asperagus, beets, and tomato and avocado on a bed of bibb lettuce and fresh basil with lime dressing. Poor DH is having real knee problems or he'd be making dinner. It hurts him just to get in the car or stand up or whatever. He's really bored. He got a steroid shot Thursday. I would think it'd be helping by now if it's going to. That's not good.

arrete - need to look up cod recipes.
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2828 suggested in an earlier post that I raise a retirement topic, if that's what I want to discuss. Maybe he/she's right, so here goes ...

Besides Options, I'm evaluating MF Hidden Gems. I have about 35% of my portfolio in small caps and all of this, with the exception of a single small position, is split between IWN and IWO. (These are small cap value and growth stock ETF's, respectively.)

I used ETF's for my US small cap asset allocation both to diversify away as much risk as I could, and to save time studying stocks. Though IWO and IWN have done very well over the last decade or so, tracking their indeces admirably, I think I'm ready to do a little more work, take a little more rick, and shoot for slightly better returns.

The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class.

Thoughts? Trey


I'm a fan of index funds as I don't want to spend time analyzing individual stocks when I could using the time to more enjoyable pursuits. If you want to dabble in individual stocks why don't you set aside a small amount of your investments (your mad money) and pick some individual stocks. If you lose out on these picks you still have the bulk of your investments.

Mike
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Oh! That explains it. I enjoy studying near death experiences, death bed visions, and the holographic universe, and quantum physics and that is why I just leave my money in index funds and leave it alone.

Studying companies and watching what they do would cause a great pain between my ears. Like tonight I'm looking forward to watching Downton Abbey on PBS with my wife.

Art


I'm a bit in the middle. The most I've ever owned at one time was 7 stocks and had another 13 on a watch list. I found it tiresome to keep up with 20 stocks with regard to all my other hobbies and interests (sports, scifi, survivalist skills).

I just recently narrowed down my individual stock exposure to 4 stocks. The rest is in mutual funds.

I suspect over the next few years, I'll eventually stop picking stocks and go with mutual funds solely as I near my 1.25 million FIRE goal.

Metal
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CC, I believe you could argue your way out of a paper bag and still have a good time. Sometimes enough is enough.

You're right. We should all let Art believe he's a quantum physicist and the founder of a new religion who will be remembered for 300 years. ;-)

For dinner tonight, I'm having spaghetti and a crisp green salad with Kalamata olives, dressed with flaxseed oil.
CC

>>>>>>
I'm accepting Art for being Art and no amount of tangling with him is going to change, and that's the same with all of us on here and out there.

However, I believe I will need to use your arguing skills in dealing with this s.o.b. who put in my water line. I've left a phone message and an email a little while ago and haven't heard from him. I'm about to scream!

LuckyDog
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One trick I use from time to time is to calmly state my position once again, offer to discuss it to work out an amicable resolution, and if I don't hear from them in 24 hours I'm turning it over to my attorney.

Never had it fail to get a return phone call ASAP.
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I'm a fan of index funds as I don't want to spend time analyzing individual stocks when I could using the time to more enjoyable pursuits. If you want to dabble in individual stocks why don't you set aside a small amount of your investments (your mad money) and pick some individual stocks. If you lose out on these picks you still have the bulk of your investments.

Mike


In 2007, we hired a database administrator from Hong Kong. He and I hit it off quickly and became friends. He had an interest in personal finances and stock investing so we spent about 15 minutes every work day going over stock strategies we were working on.

At that time, my focus was targeting energy and commodity stocks. I usually had 5-7 stocks invested at any one time. He preferred putting all his money in only 1 stock at a time. I told him he was crazy.

His 1st stock was in American Airlines. He had some initial success with it and then sold as it started going down. He broke close to even. Fortunately for him, he sold way before they declared bankruptcy.

Then he set his sites on SIRI early in 2009 and bought it in the .40 range. All in. He has since moved to Taiwon and does part time consulting for us so we still converse. SIRI is now over $3 per share and he is still 'all in' and hoping for $4 per share (which many analysts predict) when he will sell and retire after this 10 bagger.

He jokingly rubs it in on occasion. He is 10 years younger than me.

Metal
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I'm accepting Art for being Art and no amount of tangling with him is going to change

I agree, and I'm not trying to change him, either. Apparently, his wife and this board have accepted his unorthodox views, but that doesn't mean I must. And I don't.

I'm not even "tangling" with him. It's his perception that anyone who doesn't agree with him is trying to drive him insane. I can't do anything about that. He's insane or not of his own volition.

People challenge me all the time: What truly caused the housing bust? Is life insurance actually an investment? Is flaxseed oil really an important nutrient?

You don't hear me complaining. I welcome intelligent challenges to my perceptions about life.
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For day-to-day annoying situations like you're experiencing, LD, prepaid legal services provide reasonable attorney assistance. There are a bunch of them out there.

https://www.prepaidlegal.com/MS/Multisite?site=hub&assoc...
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For day-to-day annoying situations like you're experiencing, LD, prepaid legal services provide reasonable attorney assistance. There are a bunch of them out there.

https://www.prepaidlegal.com/MS/Multisite?site=hub&assoc......

>>>>>>>>>

well, as luck would have it, while I was posting the Polish joke thingie, the doorbell rang and it was the plumber! He was here to fix the faucet...I told him about the city coming by and saying there was a problem with hookup and I had emailed contractor and phoned him. He looked at it and said he'd wait to hear from contractor and that he would come by again and that he only had time to fix the faucet. I said okay. The kitchen was a mess and I apologized but while he was out at the truck I did a quicky clean up and thanked him for dropping as I can clean up quicker when this happens than when I'm by myself. It's amazing!

Anyway, he replaced the diverter and I have strong water pressure at the kitchen faucet. Easy peazy job and at no charge.

This gives me hope that the contractor will do whatever needs to be done to make it right.

I gave the plumber my phone numbers.....no, not for that but to call before he comes because I have jury duty for two wks.

These guys must think that people who don't work always stay home....no call or nothing to let me know. Good thing I was home.

LD
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I'm accepting Art for being Art and no amount of tangling with him is going to change

I agree, and I'm not trying to change him, either. Apparently, his wife and this board have accepted his unorthodox views, but that doesn't mean I must. And I don't.

I'm not even "tangling" with him. It's his perception that anyone who doesn't agree with him is trying to drive him insane. I can't do anything about that. He's insane or not of his own volition.

People challenge me all the time: What truly caused the housing bust? Is life insurance actually an investment? Is flaxseed oil really an important nutrient?

You don't hear me complaining. I welcome intelligent challenges to my perceptions about life.
CC

>>>>>>>>>>>

Surely, you believe in something or enjoy something that is not in the mainstream of things....we all do. I have my animal interests and other things, I've been on the wild side, my addictions and all that.....and I dare say, some folks on here have taken issue with those things and don't agree at all. THat's fine, some of y'all can make me scratch my head and wonder but that's life. I still love y'all, the regulars that is, not those foreigners that invade the room from time to time. We don't have to argue to change each other though, it doesn't work and causes heartache in the long run.

LD
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Surely, you believe in something or enjoy something that is not in the mainstream of things....we all do. I have my animal interests and other things, I've been on the wild side, my addictions and all that.....and I dare say, some folks on here have taken issue with those things and don't agree at all. THat's fine, some of y'all can make me scratch my head and wonder but that's life. I still love y'all, the regulars that is, not those foreigners that invade the room from time to time. We don't have to argue to change each other though, it doesn't work and causes heartache in the long run.

LD


Well said LD. I definately have my unusual interests and bents. I mean, how many scifi nerd, vegan, evangelical Christian health/fitness nazi's do you know? lol

I'm glad I'm accepted here. <g>

Metal
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Surely, you believe in something or enjoy something that is not in the mainstream of things....we all do.

Well, I enjoy beading and getting deals on eBay, but I'm not a conspiracy theorist, nor do I have a goal of inventing a new religion. I'm also convinced that absolutely no one will have heard of me in 300 years. ;-)

Art doesn't agree with me about topics and theories that millions of people believe, yet you don't hear me saying, "That Art drives me insane." And if I did say something like that, I would hope someone would call me on it.

People have differences of opinion. It's time for Art to grow up and accept that and cease his kvetching about topics discussed on this, a discussion board.
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"I'm making cod, asperagus, beets, and tomato and avocado on a bed of bibb lettuce and fresh basil with lime dressing. Poor DH is having real knee problems or he'd be making dinner. It hurts him just to get in the car or stand up or whatever. He's really bored. He got a steroid shot Thursday. I would think it'd be helping by now if it's going to. That's not good." - arrete - need to look up cod recipes."


Yum! Your whole dinner sounds delicious. I'll probably make another "Big Salad" for dinner tonight. Cod is my favorite fish. I buy cod "loins" at Sam's club in a 2.5 lb bag. I just lightly salt and pepper them then dip them in flour and lightly fry them in light olive oil.

My right knee bothers me quite often. It comes and goes. It take naproxsen in the morning and at night before going to bed.

Art
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These guys must think that people who don't work always stay home....no call or nothing to let me know. Good thing I was home.
-------

Nah. That's what they do anyway. DH's plumber friend just drops on by. If it's a big job, he calls. If it's for a beer, he just gives it a shot. Always have to have Guinness and Smithwicks on hand.

arrete
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"I suspect over the next few years, I'll eventually stop picking stocks and go with mutual funds solely as I near my 1.25 million FIRE goal." - Metal
-----------------

I counted up all our nickels and dimes last night and figure we are right at $1 million. I used to think a million bucks was rich - not so much anymore. That's not counting my little pension from Tennessee and what we will get from social security. If you add all that in, using intercst's 4% rule (X25) I figure we are probably worth around $1.7 million?

What I mean is like how much it would take in investments times .04 to generate what we will get from my pension and our two social security checks. It's strange to think that we are now at the place I dreamed about way back when I was 30 years old taking Dr. Evan Brown's Economic Development class at the University of Georgia. I will be turning 60 in just a couple of weeks. So it took us 30 years to get to this point.

I told Bonnie she could retire now if she really wanted to but she says she's not ready - which is fine by me because we both get our health insurance through her work. So what I'm calculating on now is her retiring when she turns 66 which will put me that much closer to 65 when I can switch over and get some kind of insurance through Medicare.

Art
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I have some good plumbers when I need them. I've fired bad plumbers - don't rehire them. Two things I hate about bad plumbers:

1. When they expect me to clean up after they are finished.

2. Butt cracks.
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Cod is my favorite fish. I buy cod "loins" at Sam's club in a 2.5 lb bag.

My son (a professional chef) says tilapia is "garbage fish." He said, "Any fish that costs ten cents a pound can't be good," but I had broiled tilapia at an IHOP that was just delicious.
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My son (a professional chef) says tilapia is "garbage fish." He said, "Any fish that costs ten cents a pound can't be good," but I had broiled tilapia at an IHOP that was just delicious.


My wife and I watch Hell's Kitchen. They always rave about scallops, properly cooked of course. Never had it, so when I was in Nashville staying and Opryland Resorts, I ordered one. It looked good, nice
n'crispy, brown color, wasn't rubbery, but I couldn't stand it.

I love McDonalds fish sandwiches. And I love Talapi, bass, pike, and perch.

Different strokes for different folks.
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I've heard that too about tilapia being garbage fish but truth be told anything farm raised is suspect of being in an unclean environment particularly if it comes from Asia.....but cook it up and I've had some fine tasting tilapia and farm raised salmon. All grilled or broiled not floured and fried.

LD
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"I suspect over the next few years, I'll eventually stop picking stocks and go with mutual funds solely as I near my 1.25 million FIRE goal." - Metal
-----------------

I counted up all our nickels and dimes last night and figure we are right at $1 million. I used to think a million bucks was rich - not so much anymore. That's not counting my little pension from Tennessee and what we will get from social security. If you add all that in, using intercst's 4% rule (X25) I figure we are probably worth around $1.7 million?

What I mean is like how much it would take in investments times .04 to generate what we will get from my pension and our two social security checks. It's strange to think that we are now at the place I dreamed about way back when I was 30 years old taking Dr. Evan Brown's Economic Development class at the University of Georgia. I will be turning 60 in just a couple of weeks. So it took us 30 years to get to this point.

I told Bonnie she could retire now if she really wanted to but she says she's not ready - which is fine by me because we both get our health insurance through her work. So what I'm calculating on now is her retiring when she turns 66 which will put me that much closer to 65 when I can switch over and get some kind of insurance through Medicare.

Art

>>>>>>>

we should all be so lucky to love what we do as Bonnie has.
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"I've heard that too about tilapia being garbage fish but truth be told anything farm raised is suspect of being in an unclean environment particularly if it comes from Asia.....but cook it up and I've had some fine tasting tilapia and farm raised salmon. All grilled or broiled not floured and fried." - LD

------------------

I can't afford to be that picky. I'll eat pretty much any fish I can get a good deal on, up to and including catfish and Swai. I loves me some fish - and fish is expensive so I've always got my eyes open looking for a bargain when shopping for fish.

Now what is funny is that my baby sister, that doesn't have a pot to pee in and is poor as as church mouse, raises hell about Tilapia like she is the queen of Sheba or something? She is so weird.

I have a niece that is the same way. Only wants to feed her kids organic food yet she is the laziest woman I have ever seen in my life and goes around looking for people to mooch off of she doesn't have to work, and then acts all high falutin about organic food and whatnot. She and my baby sister are cut from the same cloth.

Art
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"we should all be so lucky to love what we do as Bonnie has." luckydog


You can't believe how smart my wife is. She was made a department head last year. She gets a lot of recognition out of her job and her students love her.

Art
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I've heard that too about tilapia being garbage fish

Here's what Wiki says about tilapia.

Tilapia is the common name for nearly a hundred species of cichlid fish from the tilapiine cichlid tribe. Tilapia are mainly freshwater fish, inhabiting shallow streams, ponds, rivers and lakes, and less commonly found living in brackish water. Historically, they have been of major importance in artisan fishing in Africa and the Levant, and are of increasing importance in aquaculture. Tilapia can become problematic invasive species in new warm-water habitats, whether deliberately or accidentally introduced, but generally not in temperate climates due to their inability to survive in cooler waters below about 21 °C (70 °F).

The tilapiines of North Africa are the most important commercial cichlids. Fast-growing, tolerant of stocking density, and adaptable, tilapiine species have been introduced and farmed extensively in many parts of Asia and are increasingly common aquaculture targets elsewhere.

Whole tilapia fish can be processed into skinless, boneless fillets: the yield is from 30 percent to 37 percent, depending on fillet size and final trim. The use of tilapia in the commercial food industry has led to the virtual extinction of genetically pure bloodlines. Most wild tilapia today are hybrids of several species.

Tilapia have very low levels of mercury, as they are fast-growing, lean and short-lived, with a primarily vegetarian diet, so do not accumulate mercury found in prey. Feral tilapia, however, may accumulate substantial quantities of mercury. Tilapia is low in saturated fat, calories, carbohydrates and sodium, and is a good protein source. It also contains the micronutrients phosphorus, niacin, selenium, vitamin B12 and potassium.

However, typical farm-raised tilapia (the least expensive and most popular source) have low levels of omega-3 fatty acids (the essential nutrient that is an important reason that dieticians recommend eating fish), and a relatively high proportion of omega-6. "Ratios of long-chain omega-6 to long-chain omega-3, AA to EPA, respectively, in tilapia averaged about 11:1, compared to much less than 1:1 (indicating more EPA than AA) in both salmon and trout," reported a study published in July 2008. The report suggests the nutritional value of farm-raised tilapia may be compromised by the amount of corn included in the feed. The corn contains short-chain omega-6 fatty acids that contribute to the buildup of these materials in the fish.
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We don't have to argue to change each other though, it doesn't work and causes heartache in the long run.
-------------

Well said. I've got my problems and I've got my core beliefs. That's life.

I also have 2 cats, one of which is extremely fluffy, and I wish when I clean my desk, it didn't look all orange fur a minute later. Does Beebs do this, 2828?

arrete - trust in dulcimers, go with recorders. Just kidding, Vile.
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cc
My son (a professional chef) says tilapia is "garbage fish." He said, "Any fish that costs ten cents a pound can't be good," but I had broiled tilapia at an IHOP that was just delicious.


This got me thinking. I've eaten tilapia on occasion. Even though DW and I are vegan 99% of the time, on special occasions, we will go for some organic, kosher, grassfed, wildcaught etc... meat. For example, I'm going to prepare some wildcaught salmon this Sunday for superbowl for my reward of eating nothing but raw fruits and veggies since New Years day.

So your son's belief that tilapia being a 'garbage' fish made me wonder if it was kosher.

Most web sites said yes. But this said 'it depends'.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060823124851AA...

According to
http://www.fishbase.org/
there are over 30 different species of fish that could be refered to as Tilapia. Of these the FDA reports only 7 are marketed in the USA
http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/cgi-bin/seafd?Q…
but of course there may be more that the FDA is not aware of. Generally tilapia is thought to be kosher, but with 30 species available, some may not be.

If you are able to purchase the whole fish, then you can visually verify that it has both scales and fins. If the fish has already been filleted, then you are on your own. Then there is also the question of whether the store had just filleted a catfish (unkosher) with the same knife and cutting board.

There is a helpful general list of which fish are kosher and unkosher that you can check here:
http://www.crcweb.org/kosher/consumer/fi…



Metal
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"This got me thinking. I've eaten tilapia on occasion. Even though DW and I are vegan 99% of the time, on special occasions, we will go for some organic, kosher, grassfed, wildcaught etc... meat. For example, I'm going to prepare some wildcaught salmon this Sunday for superbowl for my reward of eating nothing but raw fruits and veggies since New Years day. So your son's belief that tilapia being a 'garbage' fish made me wonder if it was kosher.Most web sites said yes. But this said 'it depends'. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20060823124851AA...... According to http://www.fishbase.org/there are over 30 different species of fish that could be refered to as Tilapia. Of these the FDA reports only 7 are marketed in the USAhttp://www.cfsan.fda.gov/cgi-bin/seafd?Q…
but of course there may be more that the FDA is not aware of. Generally tilapia is thought to be kosher, but with 30 species available, some may not be. If you are able to purchase the whole fish, then you can visually verify that it has both scales and fins. If the fish has already been filleted, then you are on your own. Then there is also the question of whether the store had just filleted a catfish (unkosher) with the same knife and cutting board.There is a helpful general list of which fish are kosher and unkosher that you can check here:
http://www.crcweb.org/kosher/consumer/fi… Metal

----------------------------------------------------

God I'm glad I don't have to worry about all that. I'm glad I wasn't born into a culture where they are so terrified about what they eat. It doesn't matter.

Matthew 15:
11 "not what goes into the mouth defiles a man, but what comes out of the mouth, this defiles a man."

Art
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I used ETF's for my US small cap asset allocation both to diversify away as much risk as I could, and to save time studying stocks. Though IWO and IWN have done very well over the last decade or so, tracking their indeces admirably, I think I'm ready to do a little more work, take a little more rick, and shoot for slightly better returns.

The question is this: how many individual positions should one take within a small cap allocation? HG holds a whole ton of tiny positions and many on the boards seem to lean toward "big" numbers (say 20-30 positions) as well. I think the risk can be managed with 10 or fewer within that asset class.
___________________________________

10 or fewer small caps?

That is an extremely risky portfolio, large cap and small cap stocks are very different animals

A sector allocation based on 10 stocks in the small cap arena is a very aggressive stock picking portfolio choice. Yes this is a very valid way of chasing return, but if you are already retired chasing return more aggressively in an already risky sector is something to do with eyes very widely open

10 small caps is not remotely diversified, you can have 10 small caps within an industry and barely be diversified within that industry. That's what makes them so able to generate return, as well as what makes them risky something goes right -- return == something goes wrong -- loss -- small caps do not have alternate lines of business to prop the stock in an industry problem or a production problem.

Realize you are moving more toward gambling with this sized allocation.

I would personally lean toward a using my toss away money to bet one or two well researched small caps and go with a small footprint to goose returns and maintain the bulk of my exposure through ETFs

Remember rish=return if you are saying to yourself well I can make a killing...... there is always a reason that there are not a lot of other folks in the market of an easy killing.
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God I'm glad I don't have to worry about all that. I'm glad I wasn't born into a culture where they are so terrified about what they eat. It doesn't matter.

Quite a lot of the kosher laws make sense from a perspective of public health and nutrition, relative to the location and available technology in which they were developed.

Anything pigs can eat, humans can eat. They are direct competitors for food. Feeding the pig decreases the food supply for humans, since the pig is less than 100% efficient at converting food to pig-meat.

Blood spoils faster than meat. MUCH faster. So if you completely drain the blood from the meat, it can be stored longer without spoiling.

With inadequate sewage systems, a lot of human waste slides out into the sea. Most of the sea creatures that eat waste are bottom-feeders and/or crustaceans; not many are true fish. On the other hand, bottom-dwelling creatures are likely to become contaminated even if they do not eat waste.

Now the thing about milk and meat... that's harder to explain.
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"Now the thing about milk and meat... that's harder to explain." - warrl


Most food sources of protein are expensive. If one eats meat and milk products together that reduces the supply of available protein sources by 1/2. Better to spread it out?

Just guessing.....

Art
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Reading and understanding are two different things. Very few people, without extended and extensive advanced study, actually understand quantum physics.


I don't claim to fully understand it, but I do find it fascinating.
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Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP) is one of several quantum chemistry post-Hartree–Fock ab initio methods in the field of computational chemistry. It improves on the Hartree–Fock method by adding electron correlation effects by means of Rayleigh–Schrödinger perturbation theory (RS-PT), usually to second (MP2), third (MP3) or fourth (MP4) order. Its main idea was published as early as 1934 by Christian Møller and Milton S. Plesset.


Oh Fock, I'm very perturbed after reading that.
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Surely, you believe in something or enjoy something that is not in the mainstream of things....we all do.


I believe in The Principality of Sealand. <grin>

- The Baron Andrew
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"I don't claim to fully understand it, but I do find it fascinating." - Andrew

--------------------


If our universe is a holographic projection then sub atomic particles can appear and disappear depending on whether they are being projected from the holographic film. Our universe is no more real than the film that is projected up on a theater screen.

If one of the characters in the movie were edited out (photo shopped) then he would disappear from the film. If he were then later edited back into the film he would reappear. The same exact thing happens with sub atomic particles and that is why they can do the amazing things they are capable of.

The reason sub atomic particles can communicate instantaneously with each other is because in the holographic film everything is infinitely interconnected with each other.

At a much deeper level of reality everything is interconnected and that is why sub atomic particles can sometimes seem to interact with the people who study them.

If one understands the properties of a hologram then everything makes sense.

Art

excerpt from an interview with Dr. Brian Greene in National Geographic on his book Fabric of the Cosmos:

"In the final chapter of your book, you suggest that the world may be a hologram. That sounds very Matrix-like."

"It's a very speculative idea that seems to, strangely enough, naturally emerge from string theory. Basically, the fundamental laws of the universe don't really operate in the environment around us. They may operate on sort of a distant bounding surface and give rise to the familiar world that we experience in much the same way that a thin piece of plastic, when illuminated correctly—if it's a hologram—can yield a three-dimensional image.

It might be that the deep laws are more like the thin piece of plastic existing on a thin bounding surface. Everything we know might be akin to a holographic projection of those distant laws."


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/03/0326_040326_...
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"Oh Fock, I'm very perturbed after reading that." - Andrew


It just means that sub atomic particles are never at rest. They are always busy doing something.

Art
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"I believe in The Principality of Sealand." <grin>
- The Baron Andrew



It's good to have something that gives you purpose in life.

Art
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Our universe is no more real than the film that is projected up on a theater screen.

Sounds more like the plot for a movie.

The Truman Show
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0rHH6LQdpI
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If our universe is a holographic projection then sub atomic particles can appear and disappear depending on whether they are being projected from the holographic film. Our universe is no more real than the film that is projected up on a theater screen.

If one of the characters in the movie were edited out (photo shopped) then he would disappear from the film. If he were then later edited back into the film he would reappear. The same exact thing happens with sub atomic particles and that is why they can do the amazing things they are capable of.

The reason sub atomic particles can communicate instantaneously with each other is because in the holographic film everything is infinitely interconnected with each other.

At a much deeper level of reality everything is interconnected and that is why sub atomic particles can sometimes seem to interact with the people who study them.

If one understands the properties of a hologram then everything makes sense.

Art


-------------------------------------------------------------------

Some clarification Art.

So let's make an assumption:
My body lives in a hologram. It [the hologram] is constructed by the heart felt emotions 'signaling' the hologram program or the divine matrix how to form my reality. The divine matrix takes all the signals/emotions & mixes them up to form the reality we live in.

My mind is the mechanism that allows my spirit to connect to the body. My body takes the signals & transfers them to the brain that my mind reconstructs to a picture/hologram.My mind then operates in the hologram.

Did I interpret your belief on how things work correctly?

If yes that generates another question.

Once I believe the hologram exists I should be able to manipulate it. Yes?
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"Some clarification Art. So let's make an assumption: My body lives in a hologram. It [the hologram] is constructed by the heart felt emotions 'signaling' the hologram program or the divine matrix how to form my reality. The divine matrix takes all the signals/emotions & mixes them up to form the reality we live in. My mind is the mechanism that allows my spirit to connect to the body. My body takes the signals & transfers them to the brain that my mind reconstructs to a picture/hologram. My mind then operates in the hologram. Did I interpret your belief on how things work correctly?" - tiscott0

Generally yes. I have a high degree of confidence this is correct but it's probably more complicated than that. I feel like I understand it but there is probably a part of it that I don't understand also.

The reason I feel this way is because there are quite a few physicists who "buy into" the holographic universe theory and an awful lot of people who have had near death experiences which describe what they experienced in terms that sound very "holographic" - to me like they were existing or living in or on the holographic film. Like the "soul" (for want of a better label) at the moment of death transfers from the projection back to the original film? Or something close to that.

"If yes that generates another question. Once I believe the hologram exists I should be able to manipulate it. Yes?" - tiscotto

No, that is not what I believe. I believe that we can't manipulate it individually. The individual can not conjure up any reality he wishes. There are physical laws that are written into the hologram. Laws which we have to follow. Which reminds me of some basic rules I learned as meat cutter, #1. Never try and catch a falling knife. #2. Never lick a sharp knife.

For instance I buy lottery tickets. I have bought them for years. If I could manipulate the hologram I would win every time. It never works which makes me believe that it's not possible, at least individually. The oversoul has it's own agenda.

If I jump off the edge of the Grand Canyon I will hit the bottom at the speed of 9.8 meters a second squared. Splat! <grin!>

There are some people who do believe they can manipulate it hence the book "The Secret" - but I am not one of those people. I don't think we have that much control.

The reason? Because the education of the soul is too important to leave up to chance. This side exists to teach "the soul" certain lessons and the physical laws of this universe seemed to be designed specifically to cause these things to happen: Separation, time and space, and make memories of what it was like to inhabit a physical body and live in a 3 dimensional + 1 time universe.

By the way, I'm not even sure the idea of individual "soul" separate and apart from each other is true. We are all connected holographically back to the Source. And it has it's own agenda.

excerpt from Michelle M's NDE:
"I remember understanding the others here.. as if the others here were a part of me too. As if all of it was just a vast expression of me. But it wasn't just me, it was .. gosh this is so hard to explain.. it was as if we were all the same. As if consciousness were like a huge being. The easiest way to explain it would be like all things are all different parts of the same body."
http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/michelle_m%27s_nd...

excerpt from Mellen Benedict's NDE:
"As the light revealed itself to me, I became aware that what I was really seeing was our Higher Self matrix. The only thing I can tell you is that it turned into a matrix, a mandala of human souls, and what I saw was that what we call our Higher Self in each of us is a matrix. It's also a conduit to the Source; each one of us comes directly, as a direct experience from the Source.

We all have a Higher Self, or an oversoul part of our being. It revealed itself to me in its truest energy form. The only way I can really describe it is that the being of the Higher Self is more like a conduit. It did not look like that, but it is a direct connection to the Source that each and every one of us has. We are directly connected to the Source.

So the light was showing me the Higher Self matrix. And it became very clear to me that all the Higher Selves are connected as one being, all humans are connected as one being, we are actually the same being, different aspects of the same being."
http://near-death.com/experiences/reincarnation04.html

If you read these NDE's you begin to realize they all have a very holographic flavor to them. They say things that sound like stuff I've read in several popular physics books.

I reiterate, it has it's own agenda and I think it has something to do with the education of the soul being too important to leave up to chance.

You don't have to do anything to cause separation, it will find you all on it's own. Separation, time and space, and memories of being in or inhabiting a physical body. That's it. Nothing more.

Art
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I learned as meat cutter, #1. Never try and catch a falling knife.

Yeah. I apply that rule to stocks too!<g>

The reason? Because the education of the soul is too important to leave up to chance. This side exists to teach "the soul" certain lessons and the physical laws of this universe seemed to be designed specifically to cause these things to happen: Separation, time and space, and make memories of what it was like to inhabit a physical body and live in a 3 dimensional + 1 time universe.

Ok. Now does the "soul" learn these lessons in one lifetime? Or does a "soul" continually comes back til the lessons are learned? If the later it would be similar to what Hindus believe. That one reincarnates til nirvana is reached [assuming my understanding of Hinduism is correct].

Now to the "soul" itself. Do "souls" reside as non-corporal beings in a different dimension? There must purty much an infinite number of souls waiting to enter our "physical" world. I say infinite as there are 7 billion currently on earth. And then think of all the people who have lived upon earth. Of course if "souls" make repeat trips; they would could be countable number rather than infinite.
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Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP) is one of several quantum
chemistry post-Hartree–Fock ab initio methods in the field of computational chemistry. It improves on the Hartree–Fock method by adding electron correlation effects by means of Rayleigh–Schrödinger perturbation theory (RS-PT), usually to second (MP2), third (MP3) or fourth (MP4) order. Its main idea was published as early as 1934 by Christian Møller and Milton S. Plesset.


Oh Fock, I'm very perturbed after reading that.
andrew

>>>>>>>

I think perturbation is normal. :)
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Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP)

It just sounds so dirty.
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By the way Art I've got some books on order from Amazon that you may find of interest & may be at your local library.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0307731715/ref=pe_175190_21431760_M...

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1451695195/ref=pe_175190_21431760_M...
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Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP)

It just sounds so dirty.


Down and dirty, the Bill Clinton kinda dirty, he was ridin' dirty:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeNa69uyYW0
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There are some people who do believe they can manipulate it hence the book "The Secret" - but I am not one of those people. I don't think we have that much control.


There are people who are achieving amazing things using "The Secret" and the Law of Attraction. Here are some of their stories:

http://www.thesecret.tv/stories/

I myself have had a few small successes here and there using these principles. Maybe I'll share some of those experiences when I have time and feel so inclined.

Of course, if you "don't" believe that you can influence your reality through this method, then of course the Universe will "act" according to your belief, and that's what you will experience. We're all using the Law of Attraction constantly every day whether we're conscious of it or not.

Here's some more fascinating reading, by the creator of the "Dilbert" comic strip:

http://creative.sulekha.com/simple-recipe-for-superb-success...
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I thought everyone perturbated. well just a little while ago I was perturbating as I watched city workers work.
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"Ok. Now does the "soul" learn these lessons in one lifetime?" - tiscotto

Oh God I hope so! I do not want to come back. I'm hoping that reincarnation is not true. I find it very unsatisfying!

"Or does a "soul" continually comes back til the lessons are learned? If the latter it would be similar to what Hindus believe. That one reincarnates til nirvana is reached [assuming my understanding of Hinduism is correct]." - tiscotto

I think something else is going on. It has something to do with that "connectedness and oneness" thing? Perhaps someone's brain tuning into someone else's memories? Perhaps the brain is simply a receiver and transmitter of information.

"You don't have a soul. You are a Soul. You have a body." - Walter M. Miller, Jr.

"Now to the "soul" itself. Do "souls" reside as non-corporal beings in a different dimension? There must purty much an infinite number of souls waiting to enter our "physical" world." - tiscotto

Think about consciousness? Perhaps consciousness is so different than matter that it doesn't have the same physical properties? It goes back to that old question "how many angels can sit on the head of a pin?" We think of ourselves as individual entities but perhaps "soul stuff" isn't that defined?

""I say infinite as there are 7 billion currently on earth. And then think of all the people who have lived upon earth. Of course if "souls" make repeat trips; they would could be countable number rather than infinite." - tiscotto

I have read NDE's where they said that the Universe was made for life. I don't even limit "souls" to just the earth or even just humans. Whales, dolphins, great apes, perhaps every living thing is imbued with "soul stuff" and is conscious and sentient to some degree? Who knows?

Animals do some incredible stuff sometimes that makes me wonder. There are videos on youtube of parrots that talk and use words correctly and in the right context. About at the level of a 2 year old child.

You just have to let go of your idea of separation. Separation is a "here" thing and not a "there" thing. I have a sneaking suspicion that the main reason we are here is to experience separation and learn what it means and how it feels to be separate, and perhaps become "separate, unique, individuals. It might be just that simple.

Art
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"By the way Art I've got some books on order from Amazon that you may find of interest & may be at your local library." - tiscotto


Oh! Dr. Mary Neal's (orthopedic surgeon) and Dr. Eben Alexander's (neurosurgeon) books! Yes I am! I haven't read their books yet but I've watched several youtube video's about them and read several interviews with them on different websites. I've also seen them on television. Before it's all said and done I'm sure I'll read their books.

Dr. Alexander's NDE changed his life and how he views reality. Almost all the books I read are written by people with M.D. or PhD degrees. I've probably got about 80 "life after death" books in my little library.

If you haven't ever read any books about death bed visions you may find them interesting. They are amazing. There is a free online book called Death Bed Visions by Sir William Barrett, a physicist, who was married to a surgeon and his wife used to come home from the hospital and tell him stories about things that people in the process of dying said. The link to the book is,

http://www.survivalafterdeath.info/books/barrett/dbv/content...

Another one of my favorite DBV book is Visions, Trips, and Crowded rooms by David Kessler and Final Gifts by by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley. If you are interested I have other titles about DBV's that I can share with you.

Art
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"There are people who are achieving amazing things using "The Secret" and the Law of Attraction. Here are some of their stories:

http://www.thesecret.tv/stories/

I myself have had a few small successes here and there using these principles. Maybe I'll share some of those experiences when I have time and feel so inclined.

Of course, if you "don't" believe that you can influence your reality through this method, then of course the Universe will "act" according to your belief, and that's what you will experience. We're all using the Law of Attraction constantly every day whether we're conscious of it or not." - Andrew

----------------


My God Andrew! I didn't know you believed in the law of attraction and "the secret!" Why didn't you ever share that?

I know some people are really into it just like I know quite a few people who are really into reincarnation - even some old ladies in the Church of Christ! Isn't that a hoot!

It's amazing all the different stuff people believe in. Do I know for sure what is real and what is not? Absolutely not. I'm not 100% sure about any of it. I just have a high degree of confidence in some of my theories but I won't know absolutely positively 100% for sure till I get there.

Art
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I have read NDE's where they said that the Universe was made for life.

Or for death...

Tyrone--Near Death Experience of a former pimp
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB6_QMHf0Uk

Tyrone's story updated
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1mfNys9t6I

Experience of a suicide:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYdolY6SQuI

Atheist college professor sees hell...changes his mind
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLimoqZUWgw

Heaven and hell
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBXeK8uefVs

30 minutes in hell
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZPZHWbe9dF4

Horrors of hell
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Aif_I96GaE

At 0:34
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEcz2hprZqs
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I just have a high degree of confidence in some of my theories but I won't know absolutely positively 100% for sure till I get there.

We all crave justice on this earth. Why would we eschew it in heaven? It doesn't make sense that everyone gets to waltz on in to the glorious place that Art describes via the NDE he has read. There would be no justice in that.
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We all crave justice on this earth. Why would we eschew it in heaven? It doesn't make sense that everyone gets to waltz on in to the glorious place that Art describes via the NDE he has read. There would be no justice in that.



In your world, if somebody kills 50 non-Christians in a shooting rampage but then repents and accepts Jesus, the murderer goes to heaven and the victims go to hell.


Lots of justice in that scenario.
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In your world, if somebody kills 50 non-Christians in a shooting rampage but then repents and accepts Jesus, the murderer goes to heaven and the victims go to hell. Lots of justice in that scenario.

To God, who is perfect, everyone is lost. Lost as surely as the gunman. Everyone is worthy of death. There's a solution for this dire situation.

http://usminc.org/images/MereChristianitybyCSLewis.pdf
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Now to the "soul" itself. Do "souls" reside as non-corporal beings in a different dimension? There must purty much an infinite number of souls waiting to enter our "physical" world. I say infinite as there are 7 billion currently on earth. And then think of all the people who have lived upon earth. Of course if "souls" make repeat trips; they would could be countable number rather than infinite.
___________________________

Maybe we're just a prison planet in the above scenario, nothing new coming down here, just screwups waiting out their time before the next shot
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If you haven't ever read any books about death bed visions you may find them interesting. They are amazing. There is a free online book called Death Bed Visions by Sir William Barrett, a physicist, who was married to a surgeon and his wife used to come home from the hospital and tell him stories about things that people in the process of dying said. The link to the book is,

http://www.survivalafterdeath.info/books/barrett/dbv/content......

Another one of my favorite DBV book is Visions, Trips, and Crowded rooms by David Kessler and Final Gifts by by Maggie Callanan and Patricia Kelley. If you are interested I have other titles about DBV's that I can share with you.

Art


Thanks for the link & titles Art. They & the books that I have on order should keep me busy fer a while.

Let's see if my interest in this topic is sated by these books. If not, I'll shoot you an email fer some more titles of books.

Peace brudder
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"We all crave justice on this earth. Why would we eschew it in heaven? It doesn't make sense that everyone gets to waltz on in to the glorious place that Art describes via the NDE he has read. There would be no justice in that."
------------------
"In your world, if somebody kills 50 non-Christians in a shooting rampage but then repents and accepts Jesus, the murderer goes to heaven and the victims go to hell. Lots of justice in that scenario." - feedmenowhuman
-----------------------



I'm assuming the first quote was from CC since it looks like something she'd write.

Theoretically there is some Omnipotent Omniscient Creator that we call "God" that started and created the whole thing? Now if this is true that would mean that ultimately this Creator created the bad stuff too? He would ultimately be responsible for "Satan" and Sin being in the world? He would be ultimately responsible for all the Sin in the world because He created it the way it is?

In my fantasy land this Universe is a holographic projection, not quite real, and after we cross over we will look back on this life about the same way we view a Netflix DVD. No one really died. They are all in some big Cast party in the sky having a grand old time.

We have to believe it's all real while we are here so we learn the lessons we came here to learn but after we cross over we will realize it's actually just a holographic projection, like a play or a movie.

We are all just playing our roles. The education of the soul is too important to leave up to chance. The soul's lessons are embedded in our everyday lives and it is holistically imprinted with what it needs to learn regardless of who we are, or where we live, or what we believe.

Belief is irrelevant. Agreement is irrelevant. Acceptance is irrelevant. You will experience duality and separation, time and space, and make memories of what it was like whether you want to or not.

You will become un-assimilated and resistance is futile.

Art
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"Maybe we're just a prison planet in the above scenario, nothing new coming down here, just screwups waiting out their time before the next shot " - lowstudent
---------------------


If by prison planet you mean like how you felt when you were in grade school and you were waiting for summer vacation. This earth life is a school and we are just here to learn a few simple lessons before merging back into the original holographic film from whence we originated.


"The Summerland is the name given by Theosophists, Wiccans and some earth-based contemporary pagan religions to their conceptualization of an afterlife." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Summerland

Art
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lowstudent "Maybe we're just a prison planet in the above scenario, nothing new coming down here, just screwups waiting out their time before the next shot"

Art"In my fantasy land this Universe is a holographic projection, not quite real, and after we cross over we will look back on this life about the same way we view a Netflix DVD. No one really died. They are all in some big Cast party in the sky having a grand old time."

I like Art's version better.<g>
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"Thanks for the link & titles Art. They & the books that I have on order should keep me busy fer a while. Let's see if my interest in this topic is sated by these books. If not, I'll shoot you an email fer some more titles of books." Peace brudder " tiscotto


If you read The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot it would make those books a whole lot easier to understand. It's an amazing book. You can probably find a used copy at a used bookstore near you. Mckay used books in Nashville has used copies all the time.

There is a connection between the holographic universe theory and NDE's that is not easily explained away. Dr. Ken Ring taught a course at the University of Connecticut about NDE's and he required his students to read The Holographic Universe along with his book Life At Death for the course. It just makes NDE's so much more believable and understandable.

http://www.amazon.com/The-Holographic-Universe-Michael-Talbo...

Art
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"Art"In my fantasy land this Universe is a holographic projection, not quite real, and after we cross over we will look back on this life about the same way we view a Netflix DVD. No one really died. They are all in some big Cast party in the sky having a grand old time."
----------------------------
I like Art's version better.<g>" - tiscotto

-----------------------------


That is sort of the way it is described by a lot of near death experiencers and also what a lot of hospice people report or relate they saw or see. Also forests, mountains, lakes, rivers, clear ocean, trees, birds, grass, flowers, fruits, birds, butterflies, etc. have all been reported in NDE and DBV (death bed vision) accounts.

Two days after my father in law (RD) died my SIL said she had a "strange" dream. In her dream she was in the hospital looking at her father in the hospital bed and he was still alive. She exclaimed "Daddy, you're still alive! We need to tell the nurse!" At that moment she she turned her head to the door of the room and she saw her father and another man she didn't recognize walking through the door into a bright light. Someone had come to guide or walk with RD to the other side.

Now my sister in law does not buy into my NDE stories. She is married to a Church of Christ preacher who preaches in Dallas, Texas yet two days after RD passed away she had a dream that sounded very much like what many near death experiencers describe. I have heard that exact same "door" metaphor numerous times before.

A couple of months ago my MIL told my wife that she had a dream about RD where she could hear him in the next room singing but she couldn't see him. This is also a common theme. We can't see them but if we listen closely enough, like in our dreams, we can hear him. Perhaps RD was telling MIL that he was close by and he is waiting on her. He isn't very far away.

Art
Art
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I'm assuming the first quote was from CC since it looks like something she'd write.

Art, you funny. Why don't you just cave and take me out of your P-box? <g>
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I'm assuming the first quote was from CC since it looks like something she'd write.

Art, you funny. Why don't you just cave and take me out of your P-box? <g>-CC
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I like Art's version better.<g>

Of course you like Art's version better! LOL Who wouldn't? Nothing matters. Everything's copacetic. Belief is immaterial. Bliss awaits.

I think, though, in your heart of hearts, you know that can't be right.
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If you read The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot it would make those books a whole lot easier to understand. It's an amazing book. You can probably find a used copy at a used bookstore near you. Mckay used books in Nashville has used copies all the time.

There is a connection between the holographic universe theory and NDE's that is not easily explained away. Dr. Ken Ring taught a course at the University of Connecticut about NDE's and he required his students to read The Holographic Universe along with his book Life At Death for the course. It just makes NDE's so much more believable and understandable.


Yep I've read that one. And another one of his "Your Past Lives".
http://www.amazon.com/Your-Past-Lives-Michael-Talbot/dp/0449...

As you can see from the title he buys into reincarnation.

Also I have view you tube videos of him.
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=michael+talbot+h...

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=michael+talbot+&...
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In my fantasy land this Universe is a holographic projection, not quite real, and after we cross over we will look back on this life about the same way we view a Netflix DVD. No one really died. They are all in some big Cast party in the sky having a grand old time. ~Art

I like Art's version better.<g>" ~tiscotto

That is sort of the way it is described by a lot of near death experiencers and also what a lot of hospice people report or relate they saw or see. Also forests, mountains, lakes, rivers, clear ocean, trees, birds, grass, flowers, fruits, birds, butterflies, etc. ~Art

Unless they don't describe it that way.

Medical doctor describes NDE--to hell and back
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-v1Fppjlvc

NDE by drug addict: hell is real
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQUaJaOcTyk

Of course, there are many more such NDEs on YouTube.
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Haha, 2828. Thanks for the assist. ;-)

I hope Art has a change of heart. I'd like him to wish me a happy birthday by tomorrow. ;-)
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"Art, you funny. Why don't you just cave and take me out of your P-box? <g>-CC" - 2828


Her time out isn't over yet. You know "free will" and all that? She's been naughty and now she has to pay the price. Isn't that the way it goes? If you sin you have to atone for those sins? So she has to spend the allotted time in purgatory until she's paid the price for being mean to me.

Art
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Of course you like Art's version better! LOL Who wouldn't? Nothing matters. Everything's copacetic. Belief is immaterial. Bliss awaits.

I think, though, in your heart of hearts, you know that can't be right.


Islam & Christianity both place belief/faith as the key for entrance to "heaven/Elysian fields".paradise. Hinduism & Buddhism center more on enlightenment/liberation/purification.

Buddhism has an appeal that rings true to me. It certainly describe my first decade of adulthood attempting to gain happiness via conspicuous consumption/materialism that did not lead to happiness.

1)Life is suffering
2)Suffering is caused by craving and aversion.
3)Suffering can be overcome and happiness can be attained. If we give up useless craving and learn to live in the moment(not dwelling in the past or the imagined future) then we can become happy and free.
4)The path to end suffering is being moral, in thought, speech, & deed & loving others.

We all follow the path that speaks to our spirit/soul/inner peace. And perhaps there are many roads lead to "heaven/Elysian fields". We each have our journey to make. I have no wish or need to dissuade one that their path is an erroneous one.

I now close with a hymn from brother Bob:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oo4OnQpwjkc
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To God, who is perfect, everyone is lost. Everyone is worthy of death.



That must include the unborn, which is why abortion doctors are doing God's work.
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If you sin you have to atone for those sins?

See? You do understand the fundamental issue. ;-)

When is purgatory over for me? Tomorrow's my birthday, fer cryin' out loud! You wouldn't leave the Birthday Girl in purgatory, would you?!
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Islam & Christianity both place belief/faith as the key for entrance to "heaven/Elysian fields".paradise. Hinduism & Buddhism center more on enlightenment/liberation/purification.

I understand all that, but it's the OBJECT of one's faith that is the defining and fundamental issue.
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To God, who is perfect, everyone is lost. Everyone is worthy of death.

That must include the unborn, which is why abortion doctors are doing God's work.

Art, please put FeedMeCrap in purgatory, not me. He deserves it.
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"Yep I've read that one. And another one of his "Your Past Lives".
http://www.amazon.com/Your-Past-Lives-Michael-Talbot/dp/0449......
tiscotto



Yeah, I actually picked up a copy of that book and tried to read it since it was written by one of my favorite authors. It's about how to "remember" your past lives, which I'm very skeptical about in the first place.

It's rather ironic that one of the people I most admire bought into the whole reincarnation thing when I find it so distasteful. I'm hoping to God it's something else and not what a lot of people believe it to be.

There are whole lot of people though that love talking about it. I don't get the attraction? ? Who the hell in their right mind would want to leave heaven and come back here? I'd have to be dragged back kicking and screaming.

I've watched the youtube video's of Michael Talbot also. Hey Andrew, for the record, Michael Talbot was gay. He was a Science writer. He was born the same year as me. He died in 1992 of Leukemia at the age of 39.

Three books of his that I've read twice are Mysticism and the New Physics, Beyond the Quantum, and The Holographic Universe, which I think was his masterpiece. It's ironic that Michael Talbot died only a couple of months after The Holographic Universe was published. It was like he had accomplished what he was supposed to do and was allowed to cross into heaven. He did what he came to do.

Art
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"Of course you like Art's version better! LOL Who wouldn't? Nothing matters. Everything's copacetic. Belief is immaterial. Bliss awaits. I think, though, in your heart of hearts, you know that can't be right." - cc
----------------------------------------------------
"Islam & Christianity both place belief/faith as the key for entrance to "heaven/Elysian fields".paradise. Hinduism & Buddhism center more on enlightenment/liberation/purification." - tiscotto

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And the third alternative? The Creator of the Universe was a whole lot smarter than we give Him/Her credit for. Everything is perfect, everything is working the way it should, the soul learns holistically what it's supposed to learn regardless of who we are, or where we live, or what we believe.

Everybody is healed when they enter that light. Everyone is instantly enlightened when they become reconnected to that Light. We are like actors in an educational play and as we participate in that play our souls learn the stuff they are supposed to learn. God is smarter than we give Him/Her credit for.

Free will is an illusion. All major religions are based on free will. I'm pretty sure free will is a big fat illusion. We have to believe it's all real so we have the appropriate emotional response to the lessons we encounter because the more emotional the experience the more powerful and long lasting the memory it creates.

We will look back on this life like it was a dream and it happened in the blink of an eye.

excerpt from Michelle M's NDE:
"I felt an understanding about life, what it was, is. As if it was a dream in itself. It's so very hard to explain this part. I'll try, but my words limit the fullness of it. I don't have the words here, butI understood that it really didn't matter what happened in the life experience, I knew/understood that it was intense, brief, but when we were in it, it seemed like forever. I understood that whatever happened in life, I was really ok, and so were the others here."
http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/michelle_m%27s_nd...

from Carl Turner's mystical experience:
"I had the realization that I was everywhere at the same time...and I mean everywhere. I knew that everything is perfect and happening according to some divine plan, regardless of all the things we see as wrong with the world."
http://www.beyondreligion.com/su_personal/dreamsvisions-kund...

from James E's NDE:
"I was not "told" anything in the light, as much as, I just knew everything there was to know. I knew why there was bad in the world, I knew why there was good, I knew that every little thing that will ever occur here, is exactly planned out, in order to bring about something else. Everything we have ever done or known or will know, is perfectly planned out and perfectly in tune."
http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/james_e_nde.htm

Art
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Hey Tiscotto,
Here is a NDE from Germany. The woman's name is Helga. See what she says,

"I was out of my body and fully consciousness. I could hear what everyone was saying during my operation. I was above my body and also IN the wall. I felt that I was in the whole room at once, the whole clinic, even the whole world!"

http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/helga_c_nde.htm

See what I mean when I say it has a "holographic" flavor? She felt like she was in the whole room at once, the whole clinic, even the whole world. I have read so many similar NDE's.

When they say that they tried to touch someone and their hand passed right through them. It reminds me of the holographic projector at the Oak Ridge, TN Museum of Science and Industry. They have a holographic projector there that projects this ball out into space but when you try and grab it your hand passes right through it.

I have probably read several hundred NDE's that corroborate or are congruent with the holographic universe theory. If true it has profound implications for life and why we are here.

Art
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By the way Art I've got some books on order from Amazon that you may find of interest & may be at your local library.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0307731715/ref=pe_175190_21431760_M......

http://www.amazon.com/dp/1451695195/ref=pe_175190_21431760_M......
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I got Proof of Heaven too. But still working on the One World Schoolhouse.

arrete
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Free will is an illusion. All major religions are based on free will.

I was raised Presbyterian. They believed in free will but predestination also. Seems contradictory but its not. A human has free will, but the creator is perfect & and all knowing thus knows how you choose. Sorta catch 22.<g>
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I like this part:
Did time seem to speed up or slow down? Everything seemed to be happening at once; or time stopped or lost all meaning.
How can I explain that?


Time does not seem to be linear in that dimension.
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"By the way Art I've got some books on order from Amazon that you may find of interest & may be at your local library." tiscotto
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0307731715/ref=pe_175190_21431760_M.........
http://www.amazon.com/dp/1451695195/ref=pe_175190_21431760_M.........
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"I got Proof of Heaven too. But still working on the One World Schoolhouse." - arrete

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It's not any one story that "proves" life after death. It's the overwhelming abundance of evidence, more like a courtroom trial than something done in a science lab. It's the overwhelming preponderance of evidence, near death experiences, death bed visions, mystical and transcendental experiences, dreams, after death communications, etc. that point in the direction that this life is not all there is.

It's like a puzzle with a whole lot of pieces that when you stand back and look at you see a picture, and once you see the picture it's like a big "Ah-ha!" moment and you no longer see life and the world in exactly the same way anymore.

I realize it's not science. It's something else, like a courtroom trial with lots of witnesses and they all tell the same story. It's the way that NDE's say things that sound very holographic, and you wonder why? Why does what this person say match so closely what Michael Talbot wrote about in his book? It's very strange.

It's not like Evolution cares about us having an easy, quiet, or peaceful death? It doesn't improve the evolutionary fitness of the individual. It doesn't make their offspring live longer. There is no evolutionary reason that I can think of why people should have these experiences, why people in hospice should see their dead or deceased relatives coming back to greet them and tell them they are going on a trip? Evolution just doesn't care about things like that.

"I was above my body and also IN the wall. I felt that I was in the whole room at once, the whole clinic, even the whole world!" - Helga, from her NDE description, http://www.nderf.org/NDERF/NDE_Experiences/helga_c_nde.htm

Art
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"I like this part:
"Did time seem to speed up or slow down? Everything seemed to be happening at once; or time stopped or lost all meaning."
How can I explain that? Time does not seem to be linear in that dimension. - tiscotto

---------------

Here are a few quotes for you that are identical to what you just read. I could probably find many more if I wanted to. Albert Einstein made a similar quote as did Julian Barbour physicist. - Art

"I was told that before we're born, we have to take an oath that we will pretend time and space are real so we can come here and advance our spirit. If you don't promise, you can't be born." (from Jeanie Dicus' near-death experience, 1974)

"Space and time are illusions that hold us to our physical realm; out there all is present simultaneously." (from Beverly Brodsky's near-death experience, 1970)

"During this experience, time had no meaning. Time was an irrelevant notion. It felt like eternity. I felt like I was there an eternity." (from Grace Bubulka's near-death experience, 1988?)

"I didn't know if I had been in that light for a minute of a day or a hundred years." (from Jayne Smith's near-death experience, 1965?)

"Earthly time had no meaning for me anymore. There was no concept of "before" or "after." Everything - past, present, future - existed simultaneously." (from Kimberly Sharp's near-death experience, date unknown)

"Time could also be contracted, I found. Centuries would condense into seconds. Millenniums would shrink into moments. The entire civilization that I was part of passed by in the blink of an eye." (from John Star's near-death experience, date unknown)

"...time is an illusion. The phenomena from which we deduce its existence are real, but we interpret them wrongly…" (from Julian Barbour, PhD physicist 1999)
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I got Proof of Heaven too. But still working on the One World Schoolhouse.

arrete


One World Schoolhouse looks good. Mbbe a solution to our broken education system. Teachers union would fight it tooth & nail to maintain the status quo though.
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Did time seem to speed up or slow down? Everything seemed to be happening at once; or time stopped or lost all meaning. How can I explain that? Time does not seem to be linear in that dimension.

This is key. We live in time. God does not. However we think or experience "time," we don't have a clue about time as God created it. I accept that. I just do, and I don't try to analyze it.
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Free will is an illusion. All major religions are based on free will.

I was raised Presbyterian. They believed in free will but predestination also. Seems contradictory but its not. A human has free will, but the creator is perfect & and all knowing thus knows how you choose. Sorta catch 22.<g>

“God created things which had free will. That means creatures which can go either wrong or right. Some people think they can imagine a creature which was free but had no possibility of going wrong; I cannot. If a thing is free to be good it is also free to be bad. And free will is what has made evil possible. Why, then, did God give them free will? Because free will, though it makes evil possible, is also the only thing that makes possible any love or goodness or joy worth having.” ~C.S. Lewis

Put another way...

Evil can exist only in a world that has free will. God did not create people as robots. If we were forced to love God and do good all the time, then it wouldn’t really be love. How would spousal love feel if your spouse had no choice but to behave lovingly toward you?

Therefore, free will isn't an illusion. It's a real phenomenon.
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I got Proof of Heaven too. But still working on the One World Schoolhouse.

arrete

One World Schoolhouse looks good. Mbbe a solution to our broken education system. Teachers union would fight it tooth & nail to maintain the status quo though.


One of the neat things about my proposal to abolish public schools is that to fight it, the teachers unions would almost have to claim that teachers aren't competent.
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