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I ordered two boxes of checks from Checks Unlimited out of a Sunday supplement and sent them a check for the total amount including Priority Mail. The checks arrived in plenty of time before I ran out of my previous supply of checks.

Then yesterday came an envelope fromn Checks Unlimited that on the outside said Invoice Enclosed. I thought, "What!? I paid for them."

A note with an invoice for $12.40 said I had responded to an introductory offer but their records show I have ordered from them before, and introductory rates are limited to new customers.

I already have the checks. I do not remember ordering from them in the past, but if they say I have, I suppose I have. What would Checks Unlimited do to me if I did not pay the $12.40? Sue me in Small Claims Court? Do nasty things to my credit rating?

I do plan to pay the $12.40. They are trusting me to do the right thing and pay it, and I do tend to be an ethical person.

What would you do?

Terry
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If you are certain you have never ordered from them before, demand proof that it was actually you! Perhaps they have you mixed up with someone else.
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I wouldn't be surprised if you actually did order from them before, but perhaps it was 10 years ago so you can't remember...

OTOT, the introductory offer that they sent you, was it a regular old insert in the Sunday paper, or was it addressed to you in your name? If the latter case is true, then I would ponder the ethical question vis a vis Checks Unlimited. Can you say bait and switch?

nparsn
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I do not remember ordering from them in the past, but if they say I have, I suppose I have.

Well, there are some things you may not recall doing, Terry, where you sometimes have to rely on another's recollection (ha, ha, ha), but I don't think this situation is one of them. I'd call 'em up and ask them to fax over the order form from your last shipment because they might use this tactic with everybody, hoping other people don't remember what they've ordered either.

Then, I'd switch to a bank or a credit union where your checks are free. Did you know that you could get an account at Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union, practically right across the street from your office, and you don't have to be a government employee?

elizabeth
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I'd pay it.

L
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If you don't remember ordering from them, ask to get a copy of an order form. Since people switch banks all the time, and move around a lot, they may have sent checks to a John A. Smith in your area, and think you're the same John A. Smith. If you get the form and you did in fact order from them, then I'd pay the fee.
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<<I already have the checks. I do not remember ordering from them in the past, but if they say I have, I suppose I have. What would Checks Unlimited do to me if I did not pay the $12.40? Sue me in Small Claims Court? Do nasty things to my credit rating?

I do plan to pay the $12.40. They are trusting me to do the right thing and pay it, and I do tend to be an ethical person.

What would you do?

Terry >>



This is a scam.


You filled out their order ticket and paid in full, they accepted your order, processed your payment and sent you the merchandise. The deal is concluded at that point. Changing the terms of the agreement after that is a legally and morally unenforceable claim, in my opinion.


I'd ignore it. Had they the brass to refer the claim to a collection agency, I wouldn't be intimidated. Ask for a verification that the debt is owed.


Personally, I don't reward sleazy business tactics like this.




Seattle Pioneer
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<<I'd pay it.

L >>


Why?


If I E-mail you a demand that you pay me $12.00 will you send me money too? I'd be glad to lie and tell you that you owe me.




Seattle Pioneer



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What would you do?

I agree with SP. . .this is a scam. Is there a consumer protection office somewhere in your state government? (We have such an office in the Attorney General's office.) I'd call the consumer protection office and make a report. I'm betting there are other reports on file.

Gail
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How about offering to send the checks back and canceling the order? I bet they will change their minds about the 12 bucks. I don't like the sound of that and would be disinclined to do business with a company like that.
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<<I'd pay it.

L >>


Why?


"If I E-mail you a demand that you pay me $12.00 will you send me money too? I'd be glad to lie and tell you that you owe me. "



You haven't ordered checks through the mail, I suppose. They offer an introductory rate, and you pay a higher fee if it is a reorder. Once you order, you are in their system and they will consider any order in the future (even if it's 12 years) to be a reorder. If you are in their system, they will charge you the reorder price.

You could go to the trouble of asking for proof, and then pay it. My assumption is that since it was ordered, the conditions were known, and the person doesn't remember, but may have ordered in the past, that it just isn't worth it.

So, I'd pay it and be done.

I get free checks from my credit union now.

L
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They knew that you were ordering under the special offer rate. If they were not going to give you that rate, they had an obligation to inform you BEFORE they printed the checks that you would have to pay more. If they went ahead and processed your order and sent you the checks without telling you this...then I would NOT pay them any more. If they objected in any way, I would just give them the checks back, or however many of the checks that I had not already used!


Mm
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<<You haven't ordered checks through the mail, I suppose. They offer an introductory rate, and you pay a higher fee if it is a reorder. Once you order, you are in their system and they will consider any order in the future (even if it's 12 years) to be a reorder. If you are in their system, they will charge you the reorder price.

You could go to the trouble of asking for proof, and then pay it. My assumption is that since it was ordered, the conditions were known, and the person doesn't remember, but may have ordered in the past, that it just isn't worth it.

So, I'd pay it and be done.

I get free checks from my credit union now.

L
>>


I've read through those offeers and never noticed that kind of limitation. And if you accept their proposal to sell you stuff, send them a check and they accept the order, it's too late to bill people for more later. The obvious time for the seller to dispute the correctness of the order and the amount tendered is before processing the order.

If they want to condition the order on paying more before processing the order, fine. But bill me later and its a scam, in my opinion.



Seattle Pioneer
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A note with an invoice for $12.40 said I had responded to an introductory offer but their records show I have ordered from them before, and introductory rates are limited to new customers.

I already have the checks. I do not remember ordering from them in the past, but if they say I have, I suppose I have. I do plan to pay the $12.40. They are trusting me to do the right thing and pay it, and I do tend to be an ethical person.

What would you do?


I'd pay it. $12.40 is in no way equal to the bad karma, bad feelings, and worry of even haggling with them. Sometimes the prudent thing is to say, "Know what? I think you're wrong, but I'm not willing to enter into negativity to prove it, so...you get to be right this time."
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<<I'd pay it. $12.40 is in no way equal to the bad karma, bad feelings, and worry of even haggling with them. Sometimes the prudent thing is to say, "Know what? I think you're wrong, but I'm not willing to enter into negativity to prove it, so...you get to be right this time." >>



Not with me they don't.




Seattle Pioneer
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It sounds as if they made a mistake. Companies do that sometimes.

If you already paid for the checks then send Checks Unlimited a copy of your cashed check along with a note.

I wouldn't send $12.40 for something I'd already paid for. Even if you had ordered from them before (you said you hadn't) I would think that the good customer service would serve them well in the future. You would be more likely to reorder from them if you thought they had your best interest at heart.

This can be handled easily and nicely.


Robyn

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