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I am using Complete Tax to file my taxes. My wife works for the parent company of Compete Tax and we get to file free. I have an overpayment and want to have some of the money refunded to me and have some applied to next years taxes. I have gone through all the screens and cannot find a way to do this - its either get the whole amount refunded or apply the whole amount to next years taxes. If anyone is familiar with Complete Tax and knows how to do this please repond. The only other way I thought to do this is to not file electronically and send in my Printed tax form and to just change the refund and amount applied to 2010 taxes on the printed copy.

Your thoughts and suggestions are welcome.

Thanks.
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I have an overpayment and want to have some of the money refunded to me and have some applied to next years taxes. I have gone through all the screens and cannot find a way to do this - its either get the whole amount refunded or apply the whole amount to next years taxes. If anyone is familiar with Complete Tax and knows how to do this please repond.

I've never heard of Complete Tax before, but I have one suggestion which may or may not work. Go to line 74 of the 1040 and right click. In most Windows-based programs this will give you a link to a supporting form. (For example, in TaxAct that line is fed by a 2010 Estimated Tax Worksheet.)

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
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have some applied to next years taxes.

Is there a benefit to having it applied straight from the 1040 vs. sending in an estimated payment separately?

(Not knowing of one, I'd probably do the latter so that I got a refund direct deposited sooner via e-file than I think I'd get via paper return.)
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Is there a benefit to having it applied straight from the 1040 vs. sending in an estimated payment separately?

Assuming there aren't any mistakes on the return that would lead to a reduced refund, there's no chance of late payment if you apply the previous year's overpayment. A mailed estimated payment could get lost in the mail.

Ira
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