No. of Recommendations: 5
As many of you know I bought a vacation house last January from a couple that smoked endlessly. It being a small place, the smoke was concentrated and a huge concern. I scrubbed and primed with oil based Kilz, which helped significantly, but a smell lingered. We soon got used to it, but it was quite noticeable when we went in the house and our clothes carried the odor back to our primary residence.

After lots of research, showing a trend of $400 plus units breaking down regularly, I bought for $139 this Made in the USA bare bones product: http://foreverozone.com/products/basic-build-7000-mg-h-ozone... The reviews for this product was across the board excellent, and I loved the company philosophy of build to last but make repair easy when needed. These ozone generators are not for use when you are in the house, so a fancy cabinet was not needed. It's pretty darned small, but handles 7-800SF at a time. I confess that the moderate price was also attractive, given I was not sure that it would take care of the problem.

Being cautioned by their website to take things slowly, I ran the ozone generator for 2 hours and went hiking. I shut the heat off as the ozone dissipates more slowly in the cold dry air. I used a second fan to encourage the ozone to penetrate into the bedroom and bathroom from the great room. They suggest using a timer to eliminate exposure, but my timer did not accept the three pronged ground. Instead I used an extension cord to the plug near the door and simply reached in to unplug while holding my breath. I did not open doors and windows, and when I came back 4 hours later, the smell of the ozone was still very strong though quite tolerable. It is not an unpleasant smell.

So that was done Friday, and when I left Monday AM there seemed to be no return of the stale smoke smell. The best test of that will be when we head back for Thanksgiving, after being closed up a couple of weeks, but my clothes that I brought back don't smell like a bar. Unfortunately, it did not kill the insects in the house, which perhaps would have happened with longer exposure.

On a side note, our contractor is finally getting some things done, and I had a very productive weekend as well. Unfortunately, driving home something took out my side mirror on the car, either a bird or perhaps something not secured to a truck ahead on the highway where 70mph is legal speed, and I have to go get repair quotes today. I'm just glad it wasn't the windshield that got hit, which would certainly have shattered and cause me to lose control of the car. No matter how well we drive, and I do consider myself to be a good driver, not all is in our control or avoidable for that matter. I confess, I never saw what hit me, it was that fast. Hopefully, no one behind me was impacted either, as I waited for the next exit before dealing with the scene. I'll take the bird over the scene I saw with the car that took out the deer at those same speeds. Driving through the country can be hazardous to your health.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
OTR truck drivers, generally, don't bother me - They tend to be very professional. Many SUV, Pickup and Van drivers are another matter - often mindlessly scary, to say the least. I often see them driving 5 feet apart, and closer, over the posted speed limit and some drive through heavy traffic, passing at much high speeds.
http://www.alexanderinjury.com/san-francisco-suv-accident-la...
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I don't believe ozone will kill insects. Ozone is just triatomic oxygen. It is highly oxidizing, and does react with mucus membranes (so it's not good for you to breathe, but insects likely won't care). It is also extremely unstable. According to the wiki it has a half-life of 30 minutes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozone

So it should dissipate relatively quickly from your abode. So I wouldn't worry too much about it if the place is empty for a day or so after you've used the device. Even the four hours you were gone was likely enough (it should be only 1/256th the original concentration in four hours, so unless you managed to get on the order of 25000 ppb -or 25 ppm- before you shut the unit off you're below the "danger" level).

It will be cool if that takes care of your cigarette odor problem.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Unfortunately, driving home something took out my side mirror on the car, either a bird or perhaps something not secured to a truck ahead on the highway where 70mph is legal speed, and I have to go get repair quotes today.

Six or five months ago, someone knocked the driver’s side mirror on my 1998 S-10 pickup truck off while it was parked in a supermarket parking lot. The dealer wanted something like $235.00 to replace it. I found a place online that sold me a replacement mirror for $57.00 and, with a YouTube video, I replaced it myself. A few weeks ago, someone knocked the other side view mirror off and I found an even cheaper replacement ($27.99 plus S & H - free shipping on orders over $50). If you have an older vehicle, you might post on the Fool’s Buying and Maintaining a Car Board (See; http://boards.fool.com/buying-and-maintaining-a-car-100143.a...) about replacing the mirror yourself.
;-)

C.J.V. - lots of good advise & friendly folk there, yes
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Thanks for the advice, CJV, but I can't get DH to even change the oil on the car. The dealer wanted $350 for this mirror, (it's heated and remotely controlled, and doesn't come color matching,) but a guy we've had do work before quoted me $267. Of course, we have a $250 deductible! The part itself was something like $190.

I do yard work, even do what maintenance I can on the lawn mower and handle what I can on the house, but draw the line at working on cars. I have to figure this was a freak incident, unlikely to happen again, but if it does, I can live with that. A projectile coming through the windshield at 70 mph? Less so.

IP
thrilled it wasn't worse than that
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
I do yard work, even do what maintenance I can on the lawn mower and handle what I can on the house, but draw the line at working on cars.
At least for my mirror the replacement is:
1> pop off trim piece
2> remove nuts
3> unplug wire harness (12 pin plug IIRC)
4> set aside old mirror
5> put new mirror in place
6> bolt it on
7> plug in wire harness
8> put trim piece back

10 minutes work - worth $77 to me. (although I think I'd find one for cheaper than $190 - possibly at a junkyard)

I'm fairly certain you could do it if you wanted to try - or pay your kid to do it. I think most any HS student could manage to do it.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
inparadise,

So that was done Friday, and when I left Monday AM there seemed to be no return of the stale smoke smell.

Awesome.

That foreverozone is a scary website. In "Water Ozonators", I looked at their Basic Build one that puts out 5000 mg/h. They recommend running it 18 hours/day to treat a spa (Jacuzzi). My spa has a Del Ozone MCD-50 that puts out 50 mg/h and runs 24 hours/day. Even that unit puts out enough ozone that it is not recommended for use on spas not specifically designed for high-output ozone. If you just put 50 mg/h of ozone into the water coming from the filter/pump/heater and let that straight out into the spa, the ozone levels in the air above the water will exceed Federal limits. Spas designed for these types of ozone generators (as opposed to the UV-bulb types which can put out much less ozone) have a special path for the ozone-rich water to run through before it gets to the area used by the spa's occupants. This long path allows the ozone to react with contaminants in the water before it reaches the people, and avoids exceeding the Federal limits.

But that website is advocating using 100 times the output that already exceeds Federal safety limits! Further down they page they talk about "ozone therapy" and getting ozone into your blood. Scary.

By the way, despite what 1poorguy says, ozone will kill insects if the dosage is high enough and long enough. I've had various bugs crawl into the air inlet in my ozone generator, and they turn into a cute ash sculpture of their former selves. Bees are especially cool looking as a grey ash. I haven't seen this in a while, because the manufacturers started putting a screen on the air inlet (usually an ozone-absorbing material, apparently because they fear ozone leaking out the inlet will cause them to fail Federal safety rules).

Phil
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
And then how do you paint it? Again, they don't come pre-painted and I don't run an autobody.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Again, they don't come pre-painted and I don't run an autobody.

If you're lucky, you find one in a salvage yard the same color, IP. Get the color code and it's likely that you will find one online.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
By the way, despite what 1poorguy says, ozone will kill insects if the dosage is high enough and long enough. I've had various bugs crawl into the air inlet in my ozone generator, and they turn into a cute ash sculpture of their former selves.

Interesting. It must react with their innards somehow.

Thanks for the correction. I learned something.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 3
At least for my mirror the replacement is:
1> pop off trim piece
2> remove nuts
3> unplug wire harness (12 pin plug IIRC)
4> set aside old mirror
5> put new mirror in place
6> bolt it on
7> plug in wire harness
8> put trim piece back

10 minutes work - worth $77 to me.



The one thing I've learned with DIY, is that it is seldom as easy as people tell you. I have found the learning curve for things as basic as changing out lighting fixtures or switching brands of smoke alarms to be pretty steep, and it almost always takes much longer than anticipated. I replaced 4 ceiling lights with the same product every time, and each and every replacement gave me a different set of issues!

Yes, I have learned to pick my battles. I have had to battle with more than I wanted to because of the difficulty of getting people out to work on the cabin, or the exorbitant rates they want to charge, but driving the car the two miles to the autobody guy and forking over the very affordable $267, is not worth distracting me from other projects.

Besides, what do you "pry" it off with...a flat head screw driver? I can just see that slipping and scratching the heck out of the door which somehow avoided damage. The potential for my making things worse is way too large given the relatively small payback!

IP,
thrilled to be in the financial position to pick and chose her battles, knowing what it is like to have to take every thing on or not get it done
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Besides, what do you "pry" it off with...a flat head screw driver? I can just see that slipping and scratching the heck out of the door which somehow avoided damage. The potential for my making things worse is way too large given the relatively small payback!

I'd probably mask off the paint to keep from scratching it and, depending on how tightly the trim is fastened, put something under a door trim removal tool http://autoplicity.com/products/2546815-dorman_49050_door_tr... to spread the pressure of the pry.

driving the car the two miles to the autobody guy and forking over the very affordable $267, is not worth distracting me from other projects.

Good point!

Bob
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Besides, what do you "pry" it off with...a flat head screw driver? I can just see that slipping and scratching the heck out of the door which somehow avoided damage. The potential for my making things worse is way too large given the relatively small payback!

Why would you think it is necessary to pry off the mirror? It isn't glued to the side of the car. Once you remove the nuts attaching the mirror to the car, it will come right off. Actually someone should hold it while you loosen the nut or it may fall to the ground once the nut is removed.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Once you remove the nuts attaching the mirror to the car...

Nope. Not a single visible means of attachment that can be removed other than by prying...or so it seems. Exactly why I will pay this low low price to let someone take care of it who knows what the heck he is doing.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Nope. Not a single visible means of attachment that can be removed other than by prying...or so it seems. Exactly why I will pay this low low price to let someone take care of it who knows what the heck he is doing.

If you are looking outside the car, you are looking in the wrong place. As foo1bar mentioned in his post, the attachment bolt and nuts are behind a trim piece inside the car. On my vehicle, the trim piece in triangular in shape and in the corner of the window next to the mirror. Pull the trim piece off and you see the wires and bolts.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Here are some instructions. I did not need the special tools. Look at step 3. I did not need to remove the door panel on my car to do the replacement.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/DIY-Projects/Car---Truck/Auto-...

PSU

P.S. There is a stupid popup. Glad I have a popup blocker.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
If you are looking outside the car, you are looking in the wrong place.

LOL. Which is very clear proof in that I am right to leave this in the hands of a pro, and not take it on. Not everything needs to be done by me.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Besides, what do you "pry" it off with...a flat head screw driver?
For my vehicle, I just use my fingers. The back of my hand is against the window, and the tips of my fingers go under the edge of the trim.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
In the case of my Chevy S-10, see; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DLx3j7UNGRs .
;-)

C.J.V. - bought the window crank removal tool fur $6.99 when I replaced the second mirror, me
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Kind of sucks that you needed to remove the door panel.

PSU
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Six or five months ago, someone knocked the driver’s side mirror on my 1998 S-10 pickup truck off while it was parked in a supermarket parking lot.

That stinks. I have a 1998 S-10 myself. Extended cab, 4 wheel drive, larger rims and tires. Very little rust. Just had new upper/lower ball joints Idler & Pitman arms, allignment, etc. Only 106K on the mileage. Mine's white. Paid 7K for it in '04, worth every penny! I like to go "shopping" in the junk yard for car parts. It's one of those junk yards where you-wrench-it. But even though S10's are like clones and there's a ton of them at the bone yard, there wasn't any '98's there, and none with the same door panel, console, dash, etc. Very disappointing, because I will buy things even if I don't "need" them from there, if the one in the junk yard is in slightly better shape than mine. I love junk yards the way some women probably love shopping for clothes.

I just wish our city would allow residents to work on cars in the driveway. It's gotta be in the garage. I have a garage but it's too small to jack a car up in.]

Anyway, sorry for the ot, just got a little interested when I saw the same year and make truck as mine in your post. I wasn't a big Chevy fan until I got this truck. Now as far as trucks go, I'd probably never buy another one unless it's a Chevy.

Paul T.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Kind of sucks that you needed to remove the door panel.

Axe-u-lee it wasn’t bad if you had the tools & knew how to do it. The first time, I didn’t have the tool to remove the window crank, so after removing the screw by the door handle and the two bolts below the arm rest, I loosened the clips that holds the door panel against the door and then managed to rotate the panel enough to get to the three nuts that held the mirror on. The big problem was to figure out how to get the panel off.

When I had to replace the second mirror, I decided to buy the window crank removal tool and extra panel clips and it only took me 15 or 12 minutes to do the job. My next chore is to replace the door hinge pin & bushings on the driver’s side (See; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvsIHQJIuxY&feature=relmf... ). I got the pins & bushings in the mail today, me.
;-)

C.J.V. - or I might axe a local auto repair joint to do it fur me, yes
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
C.J.V. - or I might axe a local auto repair joint to do it fur me, yes

Knowing when to pay for help is an important tool in the DIYer's tool belt.

IP
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Hey CJ,

See; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dvsIHQJIuxY&feature=relmf...

I'm curious why the guy in the video did both hinges at the same time. Leaving 1 in place while doing the other lends some support to the jack. The extra pair of hands is a definite plus, if not a necessity, even if you do 1 at a time. You also want to check that the holes the bushing fit in aren't wallowed out, which will result it very short wear time. Here's another video you might want to watch - touches on some things (like addressing wallowed out hinge metal) the above video didn't:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&...

I rebuilt the door hinges on a 1956 Chevy convertible when I was much younger. Then again, I also removed and replaced a motor in the car, lying on my back much of the time in 18" of snow in the dead of winter. I wouldn't particularly care to do either again, nowadays.

FWIW,
Bob
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement