UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (12) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Author: inparadise Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 127342  
Subject: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 6:58 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
There is so much arguing back and forth on this board when the issue of what paint to use comes up. People tend to either lover or hate Behr, and if they hate it, they love Valspar. I've always been a Behr user, and been fairly content with it, but decided I would try Valspar for the room I painted yesterday.

I confess, I wasn't so happy with the price. In order to get the color I wanted, I had to buy their very best $29/gallon paint. The paint mixer absolutely refused to give me a lower quality paint other than the "primer in the can" blend. Of course, I had already primed!

The bottom line is that I don't find there is much difference at all in the way the paint handles, compared to the cheaper top of the line non primer in the can Behr. The guy GUARANTEED one coat coverage with the Valspar, to which I replied that painter error will almost always keep you from getting away with one coat, though perhaps that is simply my level of quality requirements. Sure enough, given that I was changing from off white to a medium darker color, there are spots here and there where you can see dots of white, though you have to look hard. I had the very same experience with the $20ish Behr in the dining room, frankly. I will check it out better in the daylight today, and decide if I go back for two more gallons or just take it as is...we'll most likely be moving in the next 12 months anyway, and if you don't know it's there, you probably won't notice.

Next room, I think I'll take the Valspar paint chip to Behr and see if they can match it. Valspar definitely has better colors.

IP
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: csp Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105711 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 11:07 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
People tend to either lover or hate Behr, and if they hate it, they love Valspar.

I hate Behr (seriously I wonder how anyone uses this stuff - maybe I've gotten bad batches or something) but I've never tried Valspar. I stick with Benjamin Moore.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: Gingko100 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105712 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 11:16 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I only use Benjamin Moore. As do almost all my commercial clients.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105713 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 11:53 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
Behr and Valspar gets lots of attention these days because those are the brands you find in Home Depot and Lowes.

All the labels you name are excellent from first rate companies. You can bet they have first rate formulas on file. But the business guys usually must decide what price point they want and then how much you can spend on raw materials for that price point.

Benjamin Moore is one of the companys owned by Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway. You usually buy their product through a local hardware store (if you can find one).

Valspar is listed NYSE. Used to be a regional producer out of Minneapolis and very strong in the upper plains states. It followed the strategy of buying up regional paint companies and then shipping in product from their very efficient plants. They use many regional brand names. The Valspar label is recent, but the company is an old line paint company with excellent technology.

If you want the best paint, try a free standing paint store. They have the most knowledgeable employees. Sherwin Williams and PPG come to mind, but there are still many regional producers out there like MAB. Glidden. Dulux. Lucite.

It is very easy to substitute materials in a paint formulation. For all sorts of reasons. Extra stuff in inventory. Regulatory changes. Shortage of an ingredient. Price changes. You rely on the brand name to maintain their quality standards.

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: ShiningDawn Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105718 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 1:14 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Sure enough, given that I was changing from off white to a medium darker color

My DH and I just started painting our new townhouse (painting over contractor white) and decided to use Benjamin Moore's Aura paint. While it is expensive (but less so if you take into account not needing to prime and not needing a million coats of paint for dark colors), it really did cover very, very well with just one coat, even for the dark colors we selected.

The dark (midnight) blue we used in a bedroom went on beautifully. If we were professionals we may have been able to get away with just one coat, however we used two coats since we had a few things we wanted to clear up. The dark red we used in a bathroom was the same color as the swatch in two coats.

If we have to paint more in the future we will definitely be buying more Aura.

Dawn

Print the post Back To Top
Author: SeeFoolRun Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105719 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 1:18 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
I've tried both & find Sherwin Williams to be much better. Worth every cent more it may cost. Covers better and has a more consistent finish than others I've tried. I can look at walls I've painted at a steep angle or under lighting from a certain angle & see huge variations in the finish from the Lowe's & HD paints. Everywhere else - that was done with SW - has a flawless finish.

I don't paint for a living but have done enough of it to have figured out what does & doesn't work for me as far as tools & material goes. I get noticeably better results from SW than any other brand I've used. Haven't used Benjamin Moore but I see tons of positive reviews of it as well.

You spend maybe $15 more for a premium paint - money well spent if it means fewer coats, fewer touch-ups, & a professional looking DIY job at the end of the day.

The other thing I like about SW is they have all my colors on file. When I want more of something, they can mix it up from their records. Or if I want something that will go well with colors in adjacent rooms they can see what colors are everywhere else & help me pick.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: PSUEngineer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105721 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 1:39 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
There is so much arguing back and forth on this board when the issue of what paint to use comes up. People tend to either lover or hate Behr, and if they hate it, they love Valspar.

Put me in the "I hate Behr" camp. It's really the only brand where I have had bad results twice. Other brands I've used include Valspar, Sherwin-Williams, Glidden and Pittsburgh. My favorite is Sherwin-Williams. I have not tried Benjamin-Moore since a store is not located near my home. Since painting is labor-intensive, I don't mind spending more money to get quality paint.

PSU

Print the post Back To Top
Author: horacekgl Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105725 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 2:18 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
I don't think any of those regionals exist anymore (MAB, Glidden, Dulux, Lucite). I'm not sure who bought Lucite, but Glidden went to Akzo Nobel (largest paint maker in the world now), MABrudder went to Sherwin-Williams, Delux went to ICI initially (may have changed hands again). Fewer and fewer independents left -- Ace, TrueValue, California Paints, Dunn-Edwards to name a few. PPI (Comex --Mexico) is also buying everything they can get their hands on (Colorwheel, Frazee, Parker Paints, General Paints). You never know if the new parent company has kept formulas or just the formula trade names so it is hard to know what you are really using from year to year. Of the majors (Behr, Valspar, SW, Ben Moore, PPG), Behr is growing the most by far including overseas. All this is set against a depressed market. Who knows what the future holds, but all these majors are still working on new formulas and marketing plans for when things turn around. I've had business meetings with all except PPG in the last year and have developmental projects in-house for most of these. These majors have the heft to survive, but many smaller companies are teetering. Still very scary for anything tied to the housing market.

glh

Print the post Back To Top
Author: 1poorguy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105726 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 2:19 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I use Dunn Edwards, FWIW. Seems to be good product. Most of the better home builders in Phoenix seem to use it.

1pg

Print the post Back To Top
Author: rael4mozo Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105728 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 2:40 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I've used both Behr (via Home Depot) and Valspar (thru Lowes). My most recent venture was to repaint a wall that had been partially opened up, so it had areas of bare drywall and spackle, but also previously painted areas. I used Behr Premium (primer plus paint), and went over a near match in colors (taupe-ish).

I was really shocked when the bare drywall, after a first coat, looked remarkably solid. It barely needed a second coat, but I did the entire wall with it and it looks great. I'd buy it again without a problem. Definitely saved me time and the extra money spent for the product was made up for by not having to use primer (and I'm a primer-fanatic, so I was prepared for disappointment)

Additionally, two things come to mind w/r/t painting. First, prepping is key. If you're going over satins or semi-gloss, then a good scuff sanding really helps along with a good clean wall.

Second is tools/technique. I've had really good luck with newer teflon-coated rollers (Lowes, elsewhere) and a criss-cross technique. First I go horizontal to get the paint on the wall, then vertical in my finish stroke. The better rollers (for me) allow less paint to build up on the roller, thereby minimizing weight and loss of product. Clean up very easy as well.

Just my two cents. Enjoy~

R4M

Print the post Back To Top
Author: fleg9bo Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105738 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 5:27 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
We painted almost half our house with Benjamin Moore's Aura last year and loved it. It's so forgiving. I've always had trouble not getting lines where I cut in but with Aura you can cut in one day and use the roller the next day and still get no lines. I'll never use anything else.

--fleg

Print the post Back To Top
Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 105744 of 127342
Subject: Re: Paint: Valspar vs Behr Date: 1/4/2010 10:01 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
horacekal, you may be more up to date than I am, (and you almost need a score card to keep up with the players), but a few additions--

MABruder made paint in Philadelphia and in Terre Haute, IN where they bought Smith-Alsop. Its news to me that SW bought them, but in this area we still have MAB stores and SW paint stores. Dulux is available here too.

Glidden and Dulux were most recently ICI brands, but ICI was sold in pieces. I think Akzo Nobel got most of it and quite possibly their paint business too.

Dupont continues to be a major producer of paint for selected applications like auto paints. Lucite was their house paint brand. They sold it to PPG some years ago.

Ace and True Value are hardware wholesalers and distributors. Ace used to make its own paint in Chicago suburbs. I presume they still do.

I'm not familiar with the others. Once there was a paint company in almost every town. It was common for the head salesman and the chief chemist to make a deal with a major customer and set up their own company. Paint making is fairly easy, and does not require lots of capital. But new environmental laws changed all that. Most have been consolidating rather than adapting products to the new environmental laws.

The growth of Home Depot and Lowes and the decline of corner hardware stores has to cause major changes in paint distribution channels. Shelf space at HD or Lowes must be quite a prize and hotly negotiated. But the decline of corner hardware stores must be squeezing those who relied on those stores to sell their products. But I don't see the demand for paint going away. And imported paints are rare (probably due to shipping costs and regulatory differences). The business must be going to the larger players--be they free standing paint stores or big box stores.

I think of PPG and Sherwin Williams as the largest US paint companies. PPG has many industrial lines including automotive paints. SW does too. But SW also bought Dutch Boy and the company that used to make Sears paint. Sherwin Williams paint comes only from the SW paint store. But they sell in other stores including discount stores using other labels.

Then there's the story of contractor white. Professional painters usually work out of a paint store where they get a discount. Pricing can be sensitive and plenty of stories are told of paint made with off grade raw materials.

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (12) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Advertisement