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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 49493  
Subject: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/14/2012 7:24 PM
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http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/manufacturing-jobs-go...

An article in today's Post Dispatch reports that skilled jobs in manufacturing go unfilled these days, even though people are unemployed. Even programs for training have vacancies.

Parents and presumably high school councilors seem to have a bias against manufacturing jobs--presumably in response to claims that manufacturing in America is going overseas. But the jobs that remain require training. This article mentions machinists. I have heard there are shortages of welders.

It seems we need to reorient thinking.

Another article in the same issue reprinted from the Chicago Tribune notes that entry level employees at Caterpillar (in Peoria, IL) are paid at levels that are no longer middle class. $15.57/hr. But that is not enough for the lifestyle (boats and vacation homes) once enjoyed by the auto industry and other manufacturing jobs. Some now barely make ends meet or need to work overtime. Or . . . But those are unskilled jobs. Training gets you better pay.
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Author: alstroemeria Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48990 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/15/2012 8:55 AM
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Asked what type of 1,000-job business would be best located in their community, the respondents put manufacturing at the top of the list.
Yet only a third...said they would encourage their own children to pursue jobs in manufacturing.


Seems like 1/3 should be more than plenty--but I guess fewer than 1/3 of their kids are interested, or at least interested enough to get the necessary training.

U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis arrived on the Flo Valley campus to tour an advanced manufacturing teaching facility and to promote the $15 million federal government grant that St. Louis Community College and eight other Missouri institutions will put toward training displaced workers and veterans for specialized production jobs.

Nice. We should put money into more community colleges for such programs--but why restrict them to displaced workers and vets? They should be open to any high school grad.

entry level employees at Caterpillar (in Peoria, IL) are paid at levels that are no longer middle class. $15.57/hr. But that is not enough for the lifestyle (boats and vacation homes) once enjoyed by the auto industry and other manufacturing jobs.

Sheesh! That's about $32k/year, definitely middle class and about what my son was paid as a first-year public school teacher in a Boston burb (12 years ago, but in a town with a significantly higher cost of living than Peoria).

Do entry-level workers in any field, even investment banking, really expect to acquire a boat and vacation home immediately?!? It took my son 6 years of frugal living to save enough on a teacher's salary for a 20% down payment to buy a cheap older condo in which he still lives 6 years later. I note that he had to spend 4 years at university, not 1 or 2 at community college, so 10 years after high school graduation to have a small piece of "the American dream." No boat or vacation home, but he travels half of every summer, renting a cabin with canoe on a lake, plus camping and can afford to travel to visit family whenever. By the time he's worked 15 years, he'll have doubled his initial salary and be well into upper middle class territory * .

Working with your hands has gotten a bum rap outside of small towns (and even there, maybe-). These days many white-collar folks seem surprised when a middle class man in an urban/suburban nabe does his own home maintenance and yard work.

* HOUSEHOLD INCOME QUINTILES 2011

1st (poor/working poor)...< $20k
2nd (lower middle class)..$20-38k
3rd (middle class).............$38-62k
4th (upper middle)............$62-100k
5th (IMO the lower 15% is also upper middle)...$100-180k
Top 5% (rich outside of pricy cities)..$180k+
Top 1% (rich)...................$350k+ (average income of top 1% is $1.5MM)

=alstro, thinks TV & movies depict unrealistic lifestyles for middle class incomes

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Author: Bert31 Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48991 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/15/2012 9:59 AM
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I came to this board today looking for advice. I currently work for an insurance company with little to no growth prospects, job insecurity, and few transferable skills outside my industry.

I considered going back to school for MBA or ohter graduate degree, but found the cost prohibitively expensive. I have zn undergrad BS in Social Sciences, which I admist although mostly useless, did help me land my first job. (It also was not expensive to obtain 15 years ago as I stayed at home, went to Community College for two years, and then transferred to another local college where I did not have to pay room and board. I was always able to find flexible part time work too as I had many contacts in town from HS etc.)

Thankfully I still have a job, but find the work very unfulfilling. Also as noted above I have very little job security or transferable skills outside my industry. To start over in a new career would cause at least a 30%-50% drop in salary. I began researching different careers and one job that continually comes up is CNC Machinsist, whether it be operator or programmer. Operator pay is about 15-16/hour, and would be great for a kid coming out of a one year tech program offered by the Community College here. IN fact, I am considering entering this program my self. The total cost is less than $10,000 for a certificate that seems to get you in the door. There are a lot of manufacturing jobs in my area (surprisingly in the Northeast) but I am of course hesitant to make th change. The ork seems very interesting to me and would be nice to switch from being a desk worker/paper pusher to actually making something. I wish I had taken the opportunity when I was younger but my Community College was more focused on preparing kids to transfer to 4 year college then entering the workforce.

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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48992 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/15/2012 2:57 PM
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An article posted on the CNBC applications channel this morning claims that the number of manufacturing jobs is trivial compared to the number of unemployed out there.

Still the message is clear. Proper training and the right skill set gets you a better job.

There are people out there who can't complete this kind of training. They are more of a problem. But people with the ability should get the training.

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Author: Brooklyn1948 Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48993 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/15/2012 3:50 PM
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I came to this board today looking for advice. I currently work for an insurance company with little to no growth prospects, job insecurity, and few transferable skills outside my industry.

Can you continue to work at your job AND get a Machinist's certificate? Lots of people hate their jobs but would not trade places with the 23 million people who are unemployed.
My husband has an MBA but that did not stop him from getting laid off twice in the past 12 years. Having said that, he was able to get a job at the age of 58 because of his previous qualifications and the MBA. He was very lucky to get that job even though he had to take a big pay cut. He is still at that job but will be retiring early next year. He has had enough. He works 12 hours a day and that's a normal work day for him and the people in his department. Because of the bad job market (financial services) people are being asked to do more and more work. There are looming layoffs coming at year end in the financial services industry here in NY.
I feel your pain but having to sell a house to raise cash due to a job loss is pretty scary. Been there. Cannot wait to get out of the city, downsize, and live a quiet peaceful life.

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Author: legalwordwarrior Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48994 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/15/2012 5:53 PM
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This article mentions machinists. I have heard there are shortages of welders.

I was back home over the weekend and just driving down the road that leads to my mom's house (about a mile off the road) there were 3 companies who were advertising for welders and pipe fitters.

One sign said they were looking for "experienced" welders and pipe fitters, another one said "Now hiring welders- top pay" and the third just said they were "hiring welders apply inside".

My son in law (a welder) is looking at getting a transfer up there with his current company and then making the jump to another company after the first of the year.

LWW

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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48995 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/15/2012 9:19 PM
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Today they announced a new program to retrain unemployed veterans.

http://www.stltoday.com/business/national-and-international/...

"The companies launching the new training effort are General Electric, Alcoa Inc., Boeing and Lockheed Martin. They're providing about $6 million in seed money." Initially in 10 cities.

US Chamber of Commerce is coordinating.

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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 48997 of 49493
Subject: Re: PD: Manufacturing Jobs go Unfilled Date: 10/24/2012 7:05 PM
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And thank goodness they do not practice age discrimination.

But we do know those newly minted graduates are very up to date and work cheap. Its a tough disadvantage to overcome--when they too are looking for the same job.

I should think the situation in IT is somewhat different from machine tools. The service life of a machine tool may be longer. And as long as the hardware is in use, your job opportunities should be secure.

Out of date skills are a problem.

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