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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 259  
Subject: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/21/2011 10:33 AM
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This is, perhaps, a little off topic here, though I have seen some "vintage" cast iron pressure cookers.

I ordered a new 8 qt Presto brand stainless steel pressure cooker on ebay for $52 + $5 shipping yesterday - not a bad price, from what I saw on Amazon and elsewhere. I plan to use it to speed up cooking beans and stocks, and maybe mess around trying to replicate something like KFC's "secret recipe", that ended up in a pressure cooker to help accommodate the volume of buziness "Cornell Sanders" enjoyed in the early years of his later franchise.

I haven't received the pressure cooker yet but, from what I've read, the pressure release valve is non-adjustable - set at 15 lbs. IF the vegetable garden I'm trying to grow works out - big IF - I'd like to can (jar??) some of the vegetables for later use... maybe make and can some homemade sauces - Mom use to make and can a chile sauce that blew Heinz and other store-bought chile sauces out the window, and I plan to research Bill Ford's site for recipes many of you have provided... or might post here.

Anyway, I'm looking for a pressure cooker that is larger and has more pressure settings - 10 (and, perhaps, 5) lb settings? I'd also like a larger capacity - say 12 to 25 qts? I think cast aluminum would work pretty well for canning, no? I think I'd prefer one w/o too much in the way of automation or built-in heater - less to break. I'd like to keep the cost, both original and long term, low. I'd like one with reasonably priced available replacement parts, especially the gasket - *might* rule out (some) vintage cookers.

As you likely can tell, I could use and would appreciate more advice and some help finding a pressure cooker to use for canning. I figure I have up to a couple of months to find and purchase one. I have more time than money. Would you help me?

Thanks,
Bob
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Author: Hetepheres Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 140 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/21/2011 11:25 AM
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I have a Presto like this one that I have used for years and always comes through.

http://www.amazon.com/Presto-23-Quart-Aluminum-Pressure-Cook...

It's a good idea to get a larger canner. Even if you are not doing large batches, the large canner will not change temperature as quickly as a smaller one will. Getting up to temp, and holding it steady, avoiding temp fluctuation, is one of the keys to a successful batch. Temperature fluctuation can make you think you have food that is okay, that all the germs are gone, but maybe not if the temp went down for long enough when you weren't looking.

And just FYI, another thing you might consider is the BPA in lids, and the constant cost. There are reusable, non-BPA lids you can get that are nice.

http://www.reusablecanninglids.com/

Hetep

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Author: Ga1Dawg Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 141 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/21/2011 12:40 PM
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I ordered a new 8 qt Presto brand stainless steel pressure cooker on ebay for $52 + $5 shipping yesterday - not a bad price, from what I saw on Amazon and elsewhere.
*************************
I brown boneless pork chops in the P/C then apply pressure foe 18-20 min. They are fall apart tender :-)

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 142 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 3:18 AM
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I made a Great Northern Bean soup, with diced potatoes and a chicken broth base - mashed some of the beans and 'taters to thicken the broth, added some chopped yellow onions, carrots, celery, a few cloves of minced garlic and several pork chops, fried in oil with some S&P, diced and thrown in, with the bones.

I brought the beans to a rolling boil, let them sit for an hour, rinsed them off and brought some of them back to a boil with the potatoes before mashing, then added the carrots, celery, onions and garlic after tossing in a skillet with some oil. I then added the rest of the beans to the pot and simmered for a few hours, but the boiled beans I added are still not tender - I'm hoping the pressure cooker will fix that.

Bob

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 143 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 7:41 AM
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Bob, FWIW, I inherited my late MIL’s 20-something pressure cooker/canner 18 or 17 years ago that she used to can green beans, etc. back in the late 40-50s. Parts for even that dinosaur are still available (See; http://www.cookingandcanning.net/ ) so I wouldn’t be too worried about buying an older model. Bout da only things dat go kin wrong on dem is da gasket and maybe da pressure gauge.

Unless you have lots more luck wid dat garden den I figures, you probably kin can all your stuff wid dat 8 quart pressure cooker if you can fit quart jars in it. Since you are single, most of what you would want to can would be best in pint jars, not quarts anyhow, IMHO. I haven’t used dat big canner in 12 or 10 years now and bought a little 3 1/2 pressure cooker for use with pint & half-pint jars, me. If all you are going to can is some barbecue sauce and maybe some acid foods like tomatoes, you don’t even need a pressure canner - a boiling water bath is sufficient.
;-)

C.J.V. - would play with the 8 quart cooker fur a year or tree before buying a biig one, me

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Author: Ga1Dawg Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 144 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 7:58 AM
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I made a Great Northern Bean soup...
********************
Now is the time to get out that cast iron skillet and make some corn bread :-)

P.S. In the South we call them soup beans

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 145 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 10:32 AM
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Now is the time to get out that cast iron skillet and make some corn bread :-)

I was thinking the same thing!!


P.S. In the South we call them soup beans

That's only because nuny'all would ever warm up to anything with the "N" word in it. <BG>

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 146 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 1:59 PM
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Thanks, very much, Hetep!!

These are on my shopping list - If you (and others) would check them and provide your opinion, I would really appreciate it:

Kerr Pint Jars: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000VDUS8A/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

Kerr Qt Jars: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000BYD33/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

Tattler Lids: 2 of http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0051PDXCQ/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

Presto 7 pc Canning Kit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001V9K8A6/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

Presto 23 Qt Aluminum Pressure Cooker/Canner: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0000BYCFU/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

Presto 5-10-15 lb Pressure Regulator - not listed as fitting the particular cooker model, but several end-user posts at Amazon advise it is correct: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HMBVQ8/ref=ox_sc_act_ti...

I watched a U-Tube video in which the presenter said that he picked up a number of Kerr and Ball canning jars at Goodwill stores for $.20 to $.30 each, so I might look into that possibility, plus there's a nearby auction barn that I think will probably have them from time to time.

Thanks,
Bob

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 147 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 8:51 PM
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If you (and others) would check them and provide your opinion, I would really appreciate it:

Bob, a few thoughts bout canning;
Step number A) is to buy the book “Ball Blue Book Guide to Preserving” (See; http://www.amazon.com/Ball-Blue-Book-Guide-Preserving/dp/097... ). You kin get it at Amazon.com and/or probably at your local Wal-Mart.

You can also get your canning jar lids & bands cheeper at Wal-Mart, da local supermarket, hardware stores, etc. den at Amazon.com. Check your local stores first. Da same wid da jars.

You can usually buy canning jars cheep at da Good Will stores, rummage sales, garage sales, etc. Jest check dem to be sure dat da rims ain’t chipped, no cracks, etc. Know also dat dare bes boat wide mouth and narrow mouth jars out dare. Da wide mouth jars be used to can big stuff like pickles, etc. Da wide mouth lids don’t fit da narrow mouth jars and vicee versee.

Also on da subject of lids, dare also be plastic lids out dare dat be used after you process your canning jars so you can remove da metal bands. You don’t reely needs dem but day bes handy if you stores da canned food is a damp spot where da bands can rust. I uses dem when I makes my cold water pickles, which gotta be stored in da fridge.

You might also want to get yourself some half-pint “jelly jars” (See; http://www.amazon.com/Kerr-0501-regular-mason-half/dp/B0000B... )to put up small quantities of stuff like sauces, flavored oils, etc. I used to make up flavored olive oil fur cookin by pressure canning cheep olive oil with herbs out of da garden & cloves of garlic. When I opened da jar, I would strain out the herbs & garlic and den use the oil fur cookin. Dat way da herbs & stuff wouldn’t grow hair setting next to da stove.

Day also got 4-ounce and 12-ounce canning jars out dare but I figures dat da half pint, pint & quart jars bes all you needs at dis time.

C.J.V. - don’t can much no mo, me

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 148 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/22/2011 11:09 PM
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Step number A) is to buy the book “Ball Blue Book Guide to Preserving” (See; http://www.amazon.com/Ball-Blue-Book-Guide-Preserving/dp/097...... ). You kin get it at Amazon.com and/or probably at your local Wal-Mart.

I probably do need to do that, but I would like to read through the book that comes with the canner, first, to see what it has to offer. One of my nieces went to Ball University and my nephew worked for Ball's aerospace program for a while. I might be able to get a copy of the book through their student book store or some such - I'll ask and see if it's worth messing with.


You can also get your canning jar lids & bands cheeper at Wal-Mart, da local supermarket, hardware stores, etc. den at Amazon.com. Check your local stores first. Da same wid da jars.

The local Walmart Superstore didn't have jack, but I did find some Kerr pint and quart jars at the local grocery store for about the same price as Amazon's vendors charged before shipping charges - The shipping charges were pretty high at Amazon and I didn't see any jars offered on the Internet that were priced lower overall, so I picked up a dozen each of 1 pt and 1 qt jars. I got the wide mouth type - I figured they'd be easier to use and clean and the price was within a dollar of the regular mouth jars.


You can usually buy canning jars cheep at da Good Will stores...

I found a few at the closest Goodwill store, they looked in pretty good shape so bought them for $.25 each. They didn't come with lids, so I bought a box of 12 regular mouth lids and bands at the grocery store for $5 or $6. I would like to get the Tattler lids and rings, when I next need to get some. They look pretty good and are reusable. The lids are suppose to last a lifetime. The rings/gaskets are suppose to be reusable, too, but not for a lifetime. Tattler sells the rings separately.


Also on da subject of lids, dare also be plastic lids out dare dat be used after you process your canning jars so you can remove da metal bands. You don’t reely needs dem but day bes handy if you stores da canned food is a damp spot where da bands can rust. I uses dem when I makes my cold water pickles, which gotta be stored in da fridge.

Good point - I saw them and will keep them in mind.


You might also want to get yourself some half-pint “jelly jars” (See; http://www.amazon.com/Kerr-0501-regular-mason-half/dp/B0000B...... )to put up small quantities of stuff like sauces, flavored oils, etc. I used to make up flavored olive oil fur cookin by pressure canning cheep olive oil with herbs out of da garden & cloves of garlic. When I opened da jar, I would strain out the herbs & garlic and den use the oil fur cookin. Dat way da herbs & stuff wouldn’t grow hair setting next to da stove.

I saw some 1/2 pint jars at the grocery store, but they looked pretty short and squatty, to me - I don't think they are the same as the "jelly jars" you're talking about... I'll keep an eye out - Thanks. How long will olive oil keep in a pressure canned jar?


Day also got 4-ounce and 12-ounce canning jars out dare but I figures dat da half pint, pint & quart jars bes all you needs at dis time.

If pressure canned olive oil keeps pretty well, 4 oz jars *might* work pretty well, for me, as I really don't use it all that often and it sure goes rancid not too long after I open a bottle.

Thanks for the comments,
Bob

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 149 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/23/2011 8:44 AM
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“You might also want to get yourself some half-pint “jelly jars” (See; http://www.amazon.com/Kerr-0501-regular-mason-half/dp/B0000B......... )to put up small quantities of stuff like sauces, flavored oils, etc. I used to make up flavored olive oil fur cookin by pressure canning cheep olive oil with herbs out of da garden & cloves of garlic. When I opened da jar, I would strain out the herbs & garlic and den use the oil fur cookin. Dat way da herbs & stuff wouldn’t grow hair setting next to da stove.”

I saw some 1/2 pint jars at the grocery store, but they looked pretty short and squatty, to me - I don't think they are the same as the "jelly jars" you're talking about... I'll keep an eye out - Thanks. How long will olive oil keep in a pressure canned jar?


The half pint jars are about 4 inches tall and the 4-ounce jars are about 2.25 inches tall. They are both used mostly to put up jelly (hence da name “jelly jars”). The olive oil should last for years unopened in the pressure canned jars. I have never had the oil go bad, opened, at room temperature but da EVOO does lose its taste, opened, over a few months.
;-)

C.J.V. - keeps a 1/10th whine bottle of olive earl by da stove fur cookin dat I refills from da gallon jug in da pantry, me

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 150 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/23/2011 9:03 AM
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"Step number A) is to buy the book “Ball Blue Book Guide to Preserving” (See; http://www.amazon.com/Ball-Blue-Book-Guide-Preserving/dp/097......... ). You kin get it at Amazon.com and/or probably at your local Wal-Mart."

I probably do need to do that, but I would like to read through the book that comes with the canner, first, to see what it has to offer. One of my nieces went to Ball University and my nephew worked for Ball's aerospace program for a while. I might be able to get a copy of the book through their student book store or some such - I'll ask and see if it's worth messing with.


Like day say, da Ball Blue Book is the bible on home preserving. You kin also download guides from the USDA at http://www.pickyourown.org/canningpubs.htm as well as from most of the university cooperative extension services.
;-)

C.J.V. - didn’t use a pressure canner for most of my canning operations, me

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Author: Ga1Dawg Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 151 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/23/2011 9:46 AM
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That's only because nuny'all would ever warm up to anything with the "N" word in it. <BG>
**************************
We barely tolerate folks from North Georgia <BG>

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Author: jamesmw Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 152 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/24/2011 1:43 AM
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http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/publications_usda.html...

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Author: Ga1Dawg Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 153 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/24/2011 6:02 AM
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Go Dawgs!!!

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 154 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/24/2011 3:28 PM
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Boy, the prices on Presto's 23-qt pressure cooker have been jumping all over the chart at Amazon vendors. The day before yesterday it was priced at $77 and change, yesterday $82 and change and today $73.61. I figured I might as well go ahead and anchor one down - Now watch the price fall to $60. Either that, or they'll be out of stock with unknown reorder date... about the way it goes.

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 155 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/24/2011 9:21 PM
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This site doesn't look like too bad a place to buy spices. I'm thinking about ordering:

1 16 oz bag of Citric Acid - $6.50
1 Cup Black Peppercorns in sifter bottle - $6
4 oz bag of Cheyenne Pepper - Special Promotion - Free
1 oz Brown Mustard Seed - Free Sample

Total $12.50 (free shipping - on all orders - plus they have a wide selection, many varieties I've never heard of before, a spice education section and a blog... not too, I thunk.)

http://www.myspicesage.com/

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Author: OleDocJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 156 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 5:41 AM
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Boy, the prices on Presto's 23-qt pressure cooker have been jumping all over the chart at Amazon vendors. The day before yesterday it was priced at $77 and change, yesterday $82 and change and today $73.61. I figured I might as well go ahead and anchor one down - Now watch the price fall to $60. Either that, or they'll be out of stock with unknown reorder date... about the way it goes.


Bob,

Why in the he!! do you want to buy a 23 qt pressure cooker??? That is huge!!! Do you plan on canning 8-12 qts of green beans? You would need to have a bushel of green beans to make that many quarts of green beans. No way in he!! you are going to get that much from your modest gardening area, living in an apartment.

Like CJV said, most of the things you might want to can from a garden can be done in a boiling water bath canner setup - tomatoes and fruit. Other things, like chile peppers, are done in boiling water baths with the addition of vinegar and/or salt.

From my personal experience, you would be best off with just using a 12 qt pot (or a 20 qt canning pot). You can do 3-5 quarts at a time. That is usually way more capacity than you will actually need.

I think you are being totally unrealistic in your thinking and are about to buy something that you will never need to use. Stick with your smaller pressure cooker and use some common sense!!!


OleDoc

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 157 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 7:09 AM
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Why in the he!! do you want to buy a 23 qt pressure cooker??? That is huge!!! Do you plan on canning 8-12 qts of green beans? You would need to have a bushel of green beans to make that many quarts of green beans. No way in he!! you are going to get that much from your modest gardening area, living in an apartment.

I gots to agree wid da Doc on dis one, me. I would wait on dat big pressure cooker/canner until you sees how da garden grows. You kin always buys it later or even see if you kin get a deal on eBay later. You might want to play wid canning using dat 8-quart pressure cooker first. I figures dat, iffen its tall enough, you kin do 4 quart bottles init at once. If it ain’t tall enough fur quarts, it’ll fit 4 pints init at least and pints are more convenient fur most stuff, IMHO, anyhow.
;-)

C.J.V. - would play wid da small pressure cooker first, me

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 158 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 7:51 AM
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Why in the he!! do you want to buy a 23 qt pressure cooker??? That is huge!!! Do you plan on canning 8-12 qts of green beans? You would need to have a bushel of green beans to make that many quarts of green beans. No way in he!! you are going to get that much from your modest gardening area, living in an apartment.

A larger canner was recommended and the reasoning made sense to me - See the first post after my original in this thread, plus I subsequently read comparable comments elsewher:

It's a good idea to get a larger canner. Even if you are not doing large batches, the large canner will not change temperature as quickly as a smaller one will. Getting up to temp, and holding it steady, avoiding temp fluctuation, is one of the keys to a successful batch. Temperature fluctuation can make you think you have food that is okay, that all the germs are gone, but maybe not if the temp went down for long enough when you weren't looking.

The difference in price between Presto's 16 qt and 23 qt pressure cooker/canner was less than $20. I didn't think that was much of a price difference for the extra capacity. Presto's 23 qt pressure canner is one of the most highly regarded in reviews I've read, other than an All American... and I certainly didn't feel it warranted to pay more than twice the price for the later in my circumstances.


Like CJV said, most of the things you might want to can from a garden can be done in a boiling water bath canner setup - tomatoes and fruit. Other things, like chile peppers, are done in boiling water baths with the addition of vinegar and/or salt.

From my personal experience, you would be best off with just using a 12 qt pot (or a 20 qt canning pot). You can do 3-5 quarts at a time. That is usually way more capacity than you will actually need.


I read CJV's comments, understood, respected and appreciated then. I also read the USDA's comments in their "Principals of Home Canning" section - Food Acidity and Processing Methods:

Whether food should be processed in a pressure canner or boiling-water canner depends on the acidity of the food. Acidity can be natural, as in most fruits, or added, as in pickled food... See page i-8: http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/publications/usda/GUIDE%201%20Home%...

The USDA highly recommends always adding acid when canning, but I figured the pressure canner might provide a few added options in some limited circumstances. It also cuts cooking time in half, which is important to me. The reduced cooking time should shave a decent amount off the total processing time, plus save some on energy costs over time, for a one time expenditure.


I think you are being totally unrealistic in your thinking and are about to buy something that you will never need to use. Stick with your smaller pressure cooker and use some common sense!!!

You're a day late, Ole Doc - I already bought it. The small 6 qt pressure cooker with a 15 lb only pressure valve wouldn't have worked well, at all, for canning, but should work very well for other things I want and plan to do with it. I asked and received what I felt was good advice, an opportunity arose to purchase the pressure cooker/canner I wanted new at a reasonable discount. I acted - End of story. Had you kicked in advice a little earlier, I would have considered it in the purchase, but, probably, still would have bought the pressure cooker/canner for the versatility it adds and time it saves, and, every now and then, I do cook for more than just myself. Also, in my prior experience when I was much younger, when tomatoes came in, they came in droves and my family ended up giving half of them away, and I suspect that a lot of what was given spoiled before they were used. Now I can preserve them, and give away canned tomatoes and sauces, while spending the least amount of necessary time processing to do so.

just my .o2

Bob

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 159 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 8:18 AM
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I gots to agree wid da Doc on dis one, me. I would wait on dat big pressure cooker/canner until you sees how da garden grows. You kin always buys it later or even see if you kin get a deal on eBay later. You might want to play wid canning using dat 8-quart pressure cooker first. I figures dat, iffen its tall enough, you kin do 4 quart bottles init at once. If it ain’t tall enough fur quarts, it’ll fit 4 pints init at least and pints are more convenient fur most stuff, IMHO, anyhow.
;-)



Hi CJ,

The smaller (I forget if it's 6 or 8 qt., now that you mention it - hasn't arrived yet), wouldn't work well for pressure canning, here - It only works at 15 lbs pressure and I live in an area that is around 500-600 ft above sea level. From what I've read, pressure canning, here, generally needs to be done at 5-10 lbs pressure. Plus, at 8 qts, the pot is pretty small for canning.

I have a few pots that are large enough to can by way of boiling w/o pressure, but I wanted to cut the time it takes down. Also, on some occasions I have worked with a few guys smoking BBQ and prepping sides outside a tavern my employer owns located next to our office, and we each made a few hundred in a 5 or 6 hours. I think the pressure cookers will come in handy and I will be able to recoup their cost, and that of some of my camping equipment (propane burners and lanterns, and ice coolers), in a fairly short time frame.

Bob

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 160 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 9:42 AM
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I would wait on dat big pressure cooker/canner until you sees how da garden grows.

I probably could have avoided the garden, but I wanted vine-ripened tomatoes fresh off of the plant and herbs right outside of my door - a long time dream I enjoyed when I was much younger... I hope it works out OK - I'm working on it, as I have time. Even though a lot of farms here, in what was once known as "The Great American Bottoms", have been sold for subdivision housing development *sigh*, there are still a number of farmers markets or roadside stands where I can buy fresh vegetables pretty reasonably, if the pot garden doesn't turn out as well as I hope. So far, the plants are looking OK. I need to transplant some of plants I started from seeds a couple of weeks ago. The sweet basil that I bought as a small plant looks really good and I have a few Beefeater tomatoes about 1 1/4" in diameter... We'll see - I'm use to using quite a bit of cow manure to grow tomatoes, but I don't think the other tenants, or my landlord, would appreciate that much.

Bob

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Author: Hetepheres Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 161 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 11:07 AM
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Hi, Just got back here. I think you did the right thing, financially and canning-wise. Water bath canning can be done int he pressure cooker. just don't use the pressure lid, find something else that will just sit on the top and the large canner will water-bath process just fine.

Don't let them give you a hard time. Ya' done fine.

Once I thought I was saving money by buying a smaller food processor. It wound up costing me much more than it would have if I had just bought the big one to begin with, as the cost of the small, which turned out to not be enough, had to be considered in the lesson. {sigh}

"Bigger will generally work for smaller, but smaller won't do for bigger." - Grammy S., whom I should have listened to.

Hetep

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Author: Leana Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 162 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/25/2011 11:31 AM
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When my mother cans, if the cooker isn't full, she cans up a can of ... water.

Of course she lives out in the country and if the electricity fails she has no drinking water, so it's a stand by for that. Also if you need sterilized water, say for cleaning a wound, or making up baby formula.

Leana

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 163 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/26/2011 6:38 PM
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Weird Transactions:

I received the new 8 qt Presto stainless steel pressure cooker that I mentioned I had won on EBay for $52 + $5 shipping, total of $57 - very good good price and shipping.

The box was shipped direct from a Walmart "fullfillment center" in California. Inside the box was a Packing Slip that showed:

Ordered by: "Joe Blow" (not real name shown)
Merchandise total for the Pressure Cooker: $69.97
Shipping & Handling: $3.97
Sales Tax: $6.19
Shipment Total: $80.13


Very curious.


------------------------------------

I also received an email from EBay, as follows:


MC006 eBay Listing Removed (<TDE_TNS_CASE_ID>)


Dear Bobxxx,

Thanks for bidding on the:

(Listing Number) - Presto 8-Quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker

Unfortunately, we had to remove this listing and cancel all bids. We don't like to remove listings -- it's disappointing for everyone -- but sometimes we need to do it.

There are three main reasons why we remove listings:
-- The listing doesn't follow eBay guidelines.
-- The item isn't allowed on eBay or can only be listed under certain conditions.
-- The listing contains pictures or words that may create copyright or trademark issues.

If the seller is able to fix the problem and relist the item, we hope you'll bid on it again.

Sometimes, instead of relisting an item, a seller will suggest that you buy it directly from him or her, off eBay. If that happens, please don't accept. If anything goes wrong with the purchase, we won't be able to help you.

-- If you have questions --
Due to concerns about member privacy, we can't share any details about why the listing was removed, but we'd be glad to answer any other questions you might have. Here's the best way to contact us:
1. Click "Help" at the top of most eBay pages. You may need to sign in.
2. Click "Contact Us."
You'll be asked to describe what's going on, and we'll suggest the best way to get in touch.

We're really sorry about the inconvenience.

Sincerely,

eBay Trust and Safety team




I wonder what that's all about. I paid for the pressure cooker. I received the pressure cooker. As for as I'm concerned, the transaction has been satisfactorily completed...

However, if I'm contacted by Walmart advising that an inventory clerk was selling Walmart inventory on Ebay under an assumed name and spoofing payments for the merchandise, or if I'm advised by a credit card company that a stolen or fraudulent credit card was used to purchase the inventory from Walmart and they want me to return or pay again for the merchandise, something similar, that might become another matter...


Bob *curious*

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Author: Hetepheres Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 164 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/27/2011 11:15 AM
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Wow...


I would sit tight and see what happens.

That's one of the trouble with eBay. Most of the sellers are okay, but sometimes you wind up with the scammers. I just feel safer with Amazon.

Hetep

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 165 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 9:49 AM
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Wow...


I would sit tight and see what happens.

That's one of the trouble with eBay. Most of the sellers are okay, but sometimes you wind up with the scammers. I just feel safer with Amazon.

Hetep



I think it will be OK - The seller made good on the order. In a separate email from EBay I was advised:

Our records show that you recently contacted or received messages from (the seller) through eBay's messaging system. This account was recently found to have been accessed by an unauthorized third party, who may have used the account in an attempt to defraud other members.

We've taken action to restore this account to the original owner, but wanted to let you know to be suspicious of any communication you may have received from them. Nothing is wrong with your account at this time -- this message is just being sent as a precaution. If you have received any messages from that appears suspicious, please feel free to forward them to us at spoof@ebay.com for review.


In an unrelated instance, I once received an email, apparently from the child of a seller - The email challenged me about providing "negative feedback". I had never heard of the seller before the email and responded accordingly. The owner of the account replied, advising that he had left his account up, his mischievous son had accessed it, sent the email and he apologized. I laughed and thanked him for the response... Something similar may have happened in this instance, though you're right, one does need to exercise some caution in buying (and I suspect selling) on EBay. Most of the items I've bought on EBay have been vintage cast iron pieces. You can't buy those new. The sellers, generally, have proven responsible and easy to work with. With new items, Amazon usually beats EBay hands down, both on price and shipping charges, anyway - This purchase was an exception, that was hard to pass up. I think it will be OK. I have (some) backup with EBay's Buyer Protection, Paypal safeguards and MasterCard.

Bob

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 166 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 10:31 AM
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I picked up a couple dozen Ball 8 oz regular mouth jars. I think they will come in, particularly, handy for canning tomato paste, pretty much reducing the mix further after setting up some tomato sauce. They'll probably also come in handy for jelly, jams and preserves that I don't use very much of at one time. The "regular mouth" seems about right for this size jar, for me - The jar's not so "squat", like a wide mouth jar and the jar sides are straight up to the lid.

I also bought another dozen wide mouth pint jars. I think this will probably be the jar size and type that I will use most. The size is about right for 1 or 2 servings of sauces and should work well in size for pickling vegetables in a quantity that I can use pretty readily in a few servings. I like the wide mouth jars in this size - Again, the walls are straight up to the lid and, in this size, the jars are about the same height as a regular mouth jar.

I bought a dozen pickling cucumbers, 12 oz of Ball Bread and Butter Pickle Mix, and a gallon of apple cider vinegar (5% acidity) and I think I have enough sugar on hand to make 3 or 4 pints of Bread and Butter pickles - on my agenda for today. I'll have to use the boiling water bath to can them, as the pressure canner hasn't yet been shipped... Hopefully, it will ship before too much longer - I prefer to use a pressure canner, as I feel more safe than relying (quite as much) on acids to kill harmful bacteria. I regard the extra high heat that a pressure canner generates as a backup in killing the beasts:

It is important to have an overall high acid salsa mixture when using the water bath canning method. Otherwise the salsa could be susceptible to Clostridium botulinum bacteria, which can result in a deadly salsa. http://ezinearticles.com/?Recipes-For-Canning-Hot-and-Mild-S...

Bob

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 167 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 12:56 PM
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I bought a dozen pickling cucumbers, 12 oz of Ball Bread and Butter Pickle Mix, and a gallon of apple cider vinegar (5% acidity) and I think I have enough sugar on hand to make 3 or 4 pints of Bread and Butter pickles - on my agenda for today. I'll have to use the boiling water bath to can them, as the pressure canner hasn't yet been shipped...

Bob, why not use your 8-quart pressure cooker to process/can your Bread & Butter pickles, huuuggh? 4 pint jars should easily fit in the cooker with room to spare.

I’m making Cold Water pickles as I do not like the mushy pickles that you get from heat processing them. I prefer a nice crisp kosher dill pickle, me. I got 3 quarts of them in the fridge and a fourth quart on the kitchen counter to go in the fridge on Wednesday. Should be picking more cucumbers by then.
;-)

C.J.V. - running out of fresh dill, me

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 168 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 5:38 PM
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Bob, why not use your 8-quart pressure cooker to process/can your Bread & Butter pickles, huuuggh? 4 pint jars should easily fit in the cooker with room to spare.

Hey CJ,

I can use the 8-qt pressure cooker to can, using the boiling water method, but I cannot, safely, use it to can under pressure, with its 15 lb (only), pressure regulator in place - too much pressure, unless I use the "steam" setting on the pressure regulator - The effectiveness of using steam to can is, somewhat, controversial - The USDA hasn't, yet, acknowledge its effectiveness in killing certain types of (heat resilient) bacteria, that I gathered from your and James' links. 4 Pint jars do readily fit in the 8-qt cooker... I did look for a 5-10 lb regulator for Presto's 8-qt pressure cooker, so that I could also use it for pressure canning, but didn't find a suitable regulator.

I’m making Cold Water pickles as I do not like the mushy pickles that you get from heat processing them. I prefer a nice crisp kosher dill pickle, me. I got 3 quarts of them in the fridge and a fourth quart on the kitchen counter to go in the fridge on Wednesday. Should be picking more cucumbers by then.
;-)


I've been hunting for your recipe on those and would really like to try them!! Would you mind posting the ingredients and process, again?

Thanks,
Bob

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 169 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 8:15 PM
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“Bob, why not use your 8-quart pressure cooker to process/can your Bread & Butter pickles, huuuggh? 4 pint jars should easily fit in the cooker with room to spare.”

I can use the 8-qt pressure cooker to can, using the boiling water method, but I cannot, safely, use it to can under pressure, with its 15 lb (only), pressure regulator in place - too much pressure, unless I use the "steam" setting on the pressure regulator - The effectiveness of using steam to can is, somewhat, controversial - The USDA hasn't, yet, acknowledge its effectiveness in killing certain types of (heat resilient) bacteria

Axe-u-lee, you can. That is where dats Ball Blue Book and a bit of knowledge of thermodynamics & steam tables bes handy. Now den, since I don’t know where DW done hid my Blue Book, I gotta do dis by memory (when you gits my age, memory bes da third ting dat goes). If I members rightly, my moma’s Presto pressure cooker had a pressure regulator dat had tree rings on it, one fur 5 PSI, da second at 10-PSI and da third (and final) at 15-PSI. Iffen you filled (axe-u-lee bout half or 2/3 ) it wid water (or udder liquids) got it berling and put on da top & pressure regulator, over time da regulator would indicate, by da rings, da pressure inside. When it got up to 15-PSIA inside it would vent da excess pressure and show tree rings on da regulator. If you know the pressure inside the cooker, you know the internal temperature (See; http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/boiling-point-water-d_926.... ).

What I would do is to heat the jars as per the boiling water method in the pressure cooker, put on the regulator and allow the pressure to come up to say around 5-psi (1 ring), shut off the heat and watch the pressure & time. As long as the time is not less than 5 minutes of the amount of time needed to process it by the boiling water method for the pressure to return to atmospheric, the food will be safe (you are axe-u-lee heating it to 228 degrees F, not 212 degrees F.) which will kill anything dat can live in a acid environment. Iffen you process at at higher pressure, da odds are dat it’ll be safer (but may come out mush).
;-(

My basic “Cold Water Pickle” recipe is;

Cold Water Pickles

Make up a brine consisting of ;
8 cups cool water
2 cups cider vinegar
A scant 2/3 cup of kosher salt

Wash but do not soak cucumbers, dry and slice/cut into shape desired and pack into quart jars along with a few sprigs of dill, 4 to 8 cloves of garlic a few bay leaves, a tablespoon of mixed pickling spice and a chunk of alum about half the size of a pea. Fill jars with brine and allow to stand at room temperature for 3 to 6 days, depending upon temperature, until they just start to ferment. Put into refrigerator for another week or two and enjoy.


The basic recipe I found in a herb catalog in 1974 or 73 and have been using it ever since. About half the brine recipe is enough for 4 or 3 quarts of pickles. Usually, by the time that my cucumbers are producing best, the dill has bolted, seeded and died. In order to make pickles, I’ll pick the dill and preserve it in vinegar to use (the vinegar) for pickling.
;-)

C.J.V. - da USDA bes extra conservative, IMHO, me

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 170 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 8:33 PM
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To me, pressure cooking vs pressure canning is, kind of, akin to using different powders in reloading bullets. Bullseye powder generates a high pressure in a short time frame. 2400 powder, by way of example, generates more of a push, w/o blowing your gun apart at higher velocities, if that makes some sense.

Bob

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 171 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/30/2011 10:58 PM
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If I members rightly, my moma’s Presto pressure cooker had a pressure regulator dat had tree rings on it, one fur 5 PSI, da second at 10-PSI and da third (and final) at 15-PSI. Iffen you filled (axe-u-lee bout half or 2/3 ) it wid water (or udder liquids) got it berling and put on da top & pressure regulator, over time da regulator would indicate, by da rings, da pressure inside.

The 8-qt pressure cooker doesn't come with such a regulator, CJ, neither does the 16 and 23-qt pressure cookers/canners. I found a 5-10-15 lb pressure regulator that is "suppose" to work with Presto's 23-qt (and, I think, 16-qt) pressure cookers/canners, from end-user product reviews that I've read, but I haven't crossed such a regulator for their 8-qt pressure cooker, nor have I read any reviews that indicate that I can use the 5-10-15 psi regulator, that I bought, separately, for the 23-qt cooker/canner (not offered as an option on those products, either), on the 8-qt cooker... might be possible, just dunno.

Bob

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Author: OleDocJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 172 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/31/2011 5:21 AM
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Axe-u-lee, you can. That is where dats Ball Blue Book and a bit of knowledge of thermodynamics & steam tables bes handy. Now den, since I don’t know where DW done hid my Blue Book, I gotta do dis by memory (when you gits my age, memory bes da third ting dat goes). If I members rightly, my moma’s Presto pressure cooker had a pressure regulator dat had tree rings on it, one fur 5 PSI, da second at 10-PSI and da third (and final) at 15-PSI. Iffen you filled (axe-u-lee bout half or 2/3 ) it wid water (or udder liquids) got it berling and put on da top & pressure regulator, over time da regulator would indicate, by da rings, da pressure inside. When it got up to 15-PSIA inside it would vent da excess pressure and show tree rings on da regulator. If you know the pressure inside the cooker, you know the internal temperature (See; http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/boiling-point-water-d_926.... ).

What I would do is to heat the jars as per the boiling water method in the pressure cooker, put on the regulator and allow the pressure to come up to say around 5-psi (1 ring), shut off the heat and watch the pressure & time. As long as the time is not less than 5 minutes of the amount of time needed to process it by the boiling water method for the pressure to return to atmospheric, the food will be safe (you are axe-u-lee heating it to 228 degrees F, not 212 degrees F.) which will kill anything dat can live in a acid environment. Iffen you process at at higher pressure, da odds are dat it’ll be safer (but may come out mush).
;-(


I second that. I don't do pressure canning at all. But, I did do autoclaving of solutions for 30 years. An autoclave is sort of a giant pressure cooker that operates at +15 psi - temperature = about 255*F as I recall.

The major problem I can see with using +15 psi is the exhaust rate - you have to do a "slow exhaust" to allow the pressure and temperature to drop gradually. Otherwise, a rapid exhaust will cause the liquid inside the container to boil violently - expelling the contents out of the container.

The solution is simple: Just bring the pressure cooker to pressure, process for 15-30 min, turn off the heat and allow the temperature and pressure to drop gradually before venting the pressure cooker.


OleDoc

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 173 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/31/2011 7:44 AM
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The major problem I can see with using +15 psi is the exhaust rate - you have to do a "slow exhaust" to allow the pressure and temperature to drop gradually. Otherwise, a rapid exhaust will cause the liquid inside the container to boil violently - expelling the contents out of the container.

The solution is simple: Just bring the pressure cooker to pressure, process for 15-30 min, turn off the heat and allow the temperature and pressure to drop gradually before venting the pressure cooker.


OleDoc



Maybe, but I dunno OleDoc. 30 minutes @ 15 lbs pressure seems a heck of a high temp and pressure for canning for a pretty long time, when 10 minutes @ 5 lbs pressure is often recommended. I am a novice at this endeavor, obviously, which is why I ordered the canner - I want to can, not experiment, with my and others' health weighing in the balance. I want to use directions in tried, successful recipes, as printed, w/o injecting too much in the way of changing time, pressure and heat levels, maybe being wrong and screwing it up, becoming very ill as a consequence. You already know that chemistry isn't one of my strengths. For me, spending $73.61 for the 23 qt canner and $11.99 for the backup "jiggler" valve was, pretty much, a worthwhile 1 time expenditure. I might try something like adding or leaving out ingredients like onions or garlic, but I don't want to experiment with altering heat/pressure, time and/or acid levels. My 8-qt pressure cooker works only at 15 lbs pressure. The valve is capable of being set to "steam", but that's a horse of a different color, too. Many of the pressure canning recipes I've checked specifically call for X number of minutes at 5 or 10 lbs pressure. Such formulas are simple for me to follow w/o getting in over my head, and is a primary reason why the HE!! I bought the pressure canner. The other 2 are that it saves time over the boiling water method and some bacteria can survive 212 degrees, though not likely that temp AND an adequate level of acidity. Over time, acidity is probably more your friend in controlling bacteria than initial heat levels. Still, I don't regret buying the pressure canner (and backup "jiggler" pressure regulator), anymore than I regret buying a Weber smoker (and remote temperature sensors.) Could I get by without them? Probably. Would I prefer to - Not really.

FWIW,
Bob

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 174 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/31/2011 8:15 AM
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The pressure canner, jiggler, lid rack and canning kit are on their way - should be here by the end of the week. All of Soulard Market's vendors tend to show up on Saturdays and Eckert’s Orchard is open and strawberries are in season - The prices aren't like harvesting your own from a healthy, robust crop, but they're not that bad... I could use some recipes.

OleDoc,

You probably know peppers and salsas better than anyone I know. I picked up some dried Ancho and Arbol peppers at a local Mexican store, as well as some Canela Entera (cinnamon sticks.) I passed on buying hot peppers, tomatoes and tomatillos, that I would prefer to buy fresh, rather than dried, until I'm ready to set up some hot (and mild) salsas. I could use and would really appreciate your and others' help and guidance in this.

Thanks,
Bob

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 175 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 5/31/2011 10:53 PM
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I ordered and received 8 large mouth and 8 regular mouth plastic lids for storing in my refrigerator after opening a jar, along with some pectin, salsa mix (doesn't particularly impress me, as only tomatoes are used in the recipe on the packet) and Ball's Blue Book Guide to Preserving - I like the book. It's pretty specific and I need and appreciate that. Thanks for the recommendations on the book and plastic lids, CJV.

Bob

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Author: OleDocJ Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 176 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/1/2011 5:35 AM
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Maybe, but I dunno OleDoc. 30 minutes @ 15 lbs pressure seems a heck of a high temp and pressure for canning for a pretty long time, when 10 minutes @ 5 lbs pressure is often recommended. I am a novice at this endeavor, obviously, which is why I ordered the canner - I want to can, not experiment, with my and others' health weighing in the balance. I want to use directions in tried, successful recipes, as printed, w/o injecting too much in the way of changing time, pressure and heat levels, maybe being wrong and screwing it up, becoming very ill as a consequence.

Actually, we usually used 20 min at +15 psi for sterilization of liquids, with a slow exhaust cycle. That is sterile. There will be no danger of becoming ill from consuming canned products using those conditions. The only consideration is the texture of the product after those conditions. Probably okay for most things (meat, green beans, etc.).

You seem to have some sort of disconnect between common sense, science, physics, and cooking. Why bother seeking advice from others if you can't process it?

You want my advice for making salsas? Figure it out on your own - that seems to be your preferred method.


OleDoc

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Author: Ga1Dawg Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 177 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/1/2011 7:50 AM
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You seem to have some sort of disconnect between common sense, science, physics, and cooking. Why bother seeking advice from others if you can't process it?
***********************
Play nice ya'll

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 178 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/1/2011 8:58 AM
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“You seem to have some sort of disconnect between common sense, science, physics, and cooking. Why bother seeking advice from others if you can't process it?”

Play nice ya'll

Doc, like most scientific & engineering professionals, tends to get a bit testy when he gives advice to someone that won’t or can’t use it. In Bob’s case, I think that he doesn’t have the background knowledge and/or experience to use the advice he gets and tends to go his own way. As we used to say “You buys da kid books and he eats the covers - sheech!!!”
;-)

I have been canning food since the 60s and watching my mother and aunts doing it since the 40s, me, so I know what is safe and what comes out tasty. The last 10 or 8 years, I have pretty much stopped canning and use the freezer almost exclusively - much easier and usually tastier, that. If I get a good crop this year, I may try canning some pickled okra. The last thing I canned was some pickled green beans 7 or 6 years ago. Since they were in an acid pickling liquid, I used the boiling water method. If I were to do it today, I would probably try it in this little 3 quart pressure cooker, which would take 4 one pint jars. I would heat it up to boiling, put on the pressure regulator and allow it to build up pressure and then just shut off the heat and allow the cooker to cool slowly. That would allow the contents of the jars to get above 212 degrees for a few minutes and should sterilize the contents without turning the beans & chilies to a mush.

As for salsa recipes, a quick Google search would give more recipes than one could make in a lifetime (See; http://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mo... ). About all that we like here is pico de gallo, fresh diced tomatoes, onions & chilies with garlic and cilantro. I don’t follow a recipe as such. I just chop & add ingredients until it tastes “right”. Being “Salsa Fresca” it doesn’t take well to canning or even freezing, no.

C.J.V. - I’m starting to get tomatoes from the garden but they won’t last long, me

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 179 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/1/2011 9:25 AM
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Actually, we usually used 20 min at +15 psi for sterilization of liquids, with a slow exhaust cycle. That is sterile. There will be no danger of becoming ill from consuming canned products using those conditions. The only consideration is the texture of the product after those conditions. Probably okay for most things (meat, green beans, etc.).

Ball's Blue Book does advise that you can use a 15-lb only pressure cooker/canner in lieu of 10-bls with their recipes that call for 10-lbs pressure. And, it advises to not change the processing times provided for 10-lbs pressure. So, it does, indeed, appear that one could use the 15-lb pressure cooker to can low-acid foods and the boiling water method to process foods/mixtures high in acid. I look forward to comparing the results, if there is any noticeable difference in them, at all.


You seem to have some sort of disconnect between common sense, science, physics, and cooking. Why bother seeking advice from others if you can't process it?

Pffft

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 180 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/1/2011 10:08 AM
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Doc, like most scientific & engineering professionals, tends to get a bit testy when he gives advice to someone that won’t or can’t use it. In Bob’s case, I think that he doesn’t have the background knowledge and/or experience to use the advice he gets and tends to go his own way. As we used to say “You buys da kid books and he eats the covers - sheech!!!”
;-)



You're right, CJV, I don't have the background, knowledge and/or experience and, accordingly, I don't feel entirely comfortable accepting advice at face value provided w/o support that I can follow... In other words, "I said so - Accept what I said and shut up!" It's not that I'm going my own way. I'm reading on the outside as much and as fast as I can to try to catch up. I rarely have a problem with your advices, though I have researched (some) of them further as well... not because I doubt them, so much as it makes me feel more comfortable and confident to more fully understand them, the bases on which they are founded. After I've done that, then I can more confidently say (or realize), "Yes, I get it - Thanks!!"

Thanks for your patience!!

Bob

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 181 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/1/2011 5:03 PM
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I ordered and received 8 large mouth and 8 regular mouth plastic lids for storing in my refrigerator after opening a jar, along with some pectin, salsa mix (doesn't particularly impress me, as only tomatoes are used in the recipe on the packet) and Ball's Blue Book Guide to Preserving - I like the book.

Glad you likes it, like I say dat one was the bible fur home canning. The udder one was the Kerr Canning & Freezing Guide (http://www.amazon.com/Kitchen-Cookbook-Canning-Freezing-Guid... ) but it looks to be out of print now-a-daze. There are most likely more advanced books on the subject but the Blue Book should be what you needs to get started.

I don’t like buying those salsa and/or pickling mixes as most of them are overpriced, IMHO, and I likes to mix up my own herbs & spices to my personal taste.

C.J.V. - getting enough maters to make some pico de gallo soon, me

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 182 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/2/2011 2:21 AM
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I gots da 23-qt pressure canner/cooker in yesterday - Dat is a pretty big honker... Would y'all likes some sauerkraut, dumplings and pig sausage?? I dink I kin git around 8 or 7 heads of cabbage and a couple boxes of salt - might need some help casing da sausage. ~ ~

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 183 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/2/2011 8:36 AM
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One of my friends, since grade school, once gifted me a jar of horseradish, freshly jarred from his family's farm... WOW!! - It was still crunchy and 3X as hot as any horseradish I have ever bought in a jar at a grocery store!

This comment is interesting:

Q. Is it safe to can horseradish sauce in a traditional water bath? If so how long do you do process them?

A. No, the USDA's National Center for Home Food Preservation has not found a reliable, safe way to can horseradish, using home canning equipment (which includes both water bath canners and pressure canners). It's fine to prepare it and store it in the refrigerator or freezer!

http://www.pickyourown.org/horseradishsauce.htm

Why is that the USDA hasn't found a "reliable, safe way to can horseradish, using home canning equipment"? Though I haven't visited them while they're setting up horseradish for retail sale in their homes/farms, local farmers complete that chore every year (generally, in the dead of winter, from what my friend told me.)

Thanks,
Bob *just curious

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 184 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/2/2011 8:52 AM
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I guess the USDA hasn't, yet, read this article: http://www.life123.com/food/canning-preserving/canning/canni...

hmmmm... Now I'm confused - not, entirely, uncommon, for me. ~ ~

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Author: NoIDAtAll Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 185 of 259
Subject: Re: Pressure/Canning Cooker Date: 6/2/2011 10:58 AM
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As an alternative, we have rethought the canning of salsas and found the best result is to can a tomato salsa base, using plum or paste tomatoes, and then adding freshly chopped onions or scallions, chili or jalapeño peppers and/or herbs after opening. Although, this isn't a perfect alternative to what you enjoy serving in the summertime, we believe it's the best and safest solution to try to resemble a fresh and crunchy salsa for serving in the wintertime. http://canningusasupplystore.com/recipes/index.php/canning-h...

Sounds like a good idea.

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