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Author: Babble Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 54919  
Subject: Pump up your Air Car Date: 12/12/2007 6:50 AM
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Just heard about this - you can run cars on compressed air. Exhaust is just air. Cleaner than the air that came in.

Bits from various sites:

"it is incredibly cost-efficient to run – according to the designers, it costs less than one Euro per 100Km (about a tenth that of a petrol car). Its mileage is about double that of the most advanced electric car (200 to 300 km or 10 hours of driving), a factor which makes a perfect choice in cities where the 80% of motorists drive at less than 60Km. The car has a top speed of 68 mph.

Refilling the car will, once the market develops, take place at adapted petrol stations to administer compressed air. In two or three minutes, and at a cost of approximately 1.5 Euros, the car will be ready to go another 200-300 kilometres.

As a viable alternative, the car carries a small compressor which can be connected to the mains (220V or 380V) and refill the tank in 3-4 hours.

Due to the absence of combustion and, consequently, of residues, changing the oil (1 litre of vegetable oil) is necessary only every 50,000 Km.

The temperature of the clean air expelled by the exhaust pipe is between 0 - 15 degrees below zero, which makes it suitable for use by the internal air conditioning system with no need for gases or loss of power.

The $12,700 CityCAT, one of a handful of planned Air Car models, can hit 68 mph and has a range of 125 miles. It will take only a few minutes for the CityCAT to refuel at gas stations equipped with custom air compressor units; MDI says it should cost around $2 to fill the car's carbon-fiber tanks with 340 liters of air at 4350 psi. Drivers also will be able to plug into the electrical grid and use the car's built-in compressor to refill the tanks in about 4 hours."


Here's a picture: http://www.popularmechanics.com/automotive/new_cars/4217016.html

No they are not like bombs that explode when you get rear-ended; apparently they pose no such risk.

The power to compress the air can be sourced from electricity, which of course might come from a coal-fired power plant; but its a lot easier to enforce clean-up on a relatively few, highly regulated and capitalized mega power plants, than it is to clean up from the tailpipes of billions of cars all over the place.

Air compression can also be done by solar, wind, etc. in the future.

Amazing how simple the engine and concept are. Tata Corp. in India is going to put 60,000 air cars onto the market there in 2008.
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