Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 0
From Libby's Pumpkin Pie Recipe:

Ingredients

3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
2 large eggs
1 can (15 oz.) LIBBY'S® 100% Pure Pumpkin
1 can (12 fl. oz.) NESTLÉ® CARNATION® Evaporated Milk
1 unbaked 9-inch (4-cup volume) deep-dish pie shell
Whipped cream (optional)

This is the exact same recipe on the store brand pumpkin, btw--except they substitute their own brand of pumpkin and evaporated milk.

So I assume cloves are important to the taste--however they are ridiculously expensive when you only need 1/8 tsp. (~$8 a jar in the first store I tried). I went into another store to find a better deal, and met an elderly lady in the spice aisle asking me to help her find 'ground cloves'. I said "that's what I'm looking for!" So I found them and they were $10 a jar. Yikes. Her husband came over and we all tried to find a cheaper alternative. I found this:

McCormick's Pumpkin Pie Spice

A blend of spices designed to impart a pumpkin pie spice flavor characteristics.

Ingredients:

CINNAMON, GINGER, NUTMEG, ALLSPICE, AND SULFITING AGENTS.


So no cloves. She decided to suck-it-up and get the cloves because she didn't want to take the chance on ruining her recipe. I passed in hope of finding a cheaper bottle--I am sure I just saw this stuff a few weeks ago when I wasn't looking for it and it wasn't as high as this.

So before I bite the bullet (or the clove)--what do you pumpkin pie bakers use? Are cloves really critical? TIA.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I use:

1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg
and 1/4 tsp each of
cloves, allspice, ginger and mace.

This is from my mother's recipe. She said that if you didn't have one of the 1/4 spices you could just use more of another, but IMO you must have either cloves or allspice. BTW, don't use freshly-grated nutmeg or, if you do, drastically reduce the amount. I learned this by making a pie once that reeked of nutmeg.

Funny, I'm baking one tomorrow, so I was just spice sniffing this morning. It was time for new cloves and allspice, but I use them quite a bit anyway.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Thanks Phil. I guess I'll just get the d@mned cloves then....:-)

But I'm going to see if I can locate the place where I saw it alot cheaper before getting the pricier stuff.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
It was time for new cloves and allspice, but I use them quite a bit anyway.

In what?

I used to stick cloves into a baked ham but since I haven't made a baked ham in years, that need no longer exists. Can't recall what else I ever used cloves for.

Allspice, OTOH, can be used in stews, etc.

Christina, hasn't baked a pumpkin pie in years
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
It was time for new cloves and allspice, but I use them quite a bit anyway.

In what?


Various rubs. I'm making one of my "go to" meals for my postponed-by-Sandy dinner party tomorrow. I make a rub for pork tenderloins (my favorite "go to" protein) of salt, pepper, and ground cloves. Sear them, paint them with a paste of maple syrup and Dijon mustard, throw in a chopped onion, and roast in a 425 oven for about 17 minutes. While the meat is resting deglaze the skillet with some chicken stock, add more syrup and mustard, reduce, swirl in some butter, et voila! Tomorrow the sides are brussells sprouts sauteed with pancetta and Uncle Ben's long grain/wild rice mix.

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Personally, I dob't like cloves much and would be just as happy to have them left out. I do use them occasionally, and I usually buy mine at the Indian store - whole. They are MUCH cheaper, and easily crushed to a powder in a coffee grinder or a mortar & pestle. Whole spices stay fresh a long time, and ground ones get stale faster.

Just for grins I checked the cost of my cloves from the Indian store: $3.26 for 1/3 of a pound, which is easily 8 or 9 times the size of the teeny-tiny jar of ground cloves at the grocery (or 2-3 times the larger normal size spice containers).
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I just buy this...

http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penzeys/p-penzeyspumpkinpie.h...

A small jar gets me through the season.

Teri
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
I have a good clove story. (Some of you old TMF food board denizens may have read it ten years ago or so?)

A friend of mine was the third generation of a family in my home town who owned a restaurant specializing in Italian fare. When he went away to college he decided to show off by making their famous spaghetti for his roommates, so he phoned his mother for a suitably scaled-down recipe.

He gathered the ingredients and spent an entire day in the kitchen preparing sugo. He had helped in the family business while growing up, but had never been entrusted with making the all-important sauce.

The result was a disaster! It was not only unpalatable, it actually reeked, and they had to evacuate the house and air it out.

My friend called his mother to find out what had gone wrong. After hearing his story she asked him to read the recipe back to her. When he got to "56 cloves" she stopped him.

"56 cloves! That was supposed to be 5-6 cloves." she said, while laughing so hard she could barely speak.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
After hearing his story she asked him to read the recipe back to her. When he got to "56 cloves" she stopped him.

"56 cloves! That was supposed to be 5-6 cloves." she said, while laughing so hard she could barely speak.


Reminds me of a old college friend in Alaska back in 1972. He was making chili from a recipe in a Good Housekeeping or maybe it was a Betty Crocker Cookbook. At the end of the recipe it said” For spicier chili, add 1 clove.” Well Eddie had never seen a whole clove before but he had a jar of ground cloves in his spice rack. He also had fresh garlic cloves so he figured that a whole clove would be about the same volume as a garlic clove so he added a teaspoon of ground cloves to his pot of chili.
;-(

C.J.V. - reel spicy chili, that
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
From Tom Fitzmorris’ “New Orleans Menu, Red Bean Edition” for Monday , November 5, 2012;
Dictionary
clove, n.--1. A spice with a powerful aroma and flavor, cloves are dried flower buds from a small tree in the myrtle family. Cloves were among the spices so much in demand in Europe in the Renaissance that it inspired the exploration of the world. It originally comes from the East Indies, and is still mostly grown there. Cloves are used both in sweet and savory cooking, ranging from apple pies to baked ham. An orange studded with cloves is part of the classic preparation of New Orleans-style cafe brulot. It's also one of the elements of Chinese five-spice powder. 2. One section of a head of garlic. Also known as a "toe."

;-)

C.J.V. - thought y’all might want to know, me
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Two updates:

I found the really inexpensive ground cloves I *thought* I had seen:

There's a brand in the international food section at Foodtown called "Badia".

The Badia spices were insanely cheap. I got a ~2 oz jar of ground cloves for $1.69. The other spices were the same. Also they have 1/2 oz spice packets for only 79 cents if you only needed a little.

Second update--I got allspice while I was there--the allspice contains cloves (in addition to iirc nutmeg and cinnamon). So I probably could've just gone with the Pumpkin Pie seasoning (since it had allspice).
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Second update--I got allspice while I was there--the allspice contains cloves (in addition to iirc nutmeg and cinnamon). So I probably could've just gone with the Pumpkin Pie seasoning (since it had allspice).

Allspice is a not a mix of spices. It comes from a single dried fruit of central american tree. It was thought to taste like a mix of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves and hence its name but it is not a mix of them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allspice

I have seen recipes for pumpkin pie with and without ground cloves. You might want to make a pie with cloves and another without them to see which recipe you like more. I prefer to put ground cloves in the pie but I have noticed that it is easy to over do it and so I actually now will measure the ground cloves when I make the pie to make sure I don't use to much and make the cloves overpowering.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
...You might want to make a pie with cloves and another without them to see which recipe you like more. I prefer to put ground cloves in the pie but I have noticed that it is easy to over do it and so I actually now will measure the ground cloves when I make the pie to make sure I don't use to much and make the cloves overpowering....

That's been my recollection of cloves as well. Very strong. Easy to ruin something with them. But at least I have them available in case I'm brave enough to try them in the pie. I do use them in some types of Christmas cookies with success, so they won't be wasted.
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement