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I ordinarily use Quicken 2000. However, an estate problem requires that I revisit files made with Quicken v.4. I know I can read these files with QY2K, but there are legal arguments for keeping them in Q4 format. I have the Q4 disks, and can easily install it. But I'm afraid installation of Q4 AFTER Quicken 2000 is already in place may damage the more recent appliction and/or its files. Can anyone confirm this? Any suggestions?
O.
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but there are legal arguments for keeping them in Q4 format.
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but there are legal arguments for keeping them in Q4 format.

Ok I am curious. What possible legal arguments can there be for the data to be in a specific 'format'?

Just very curious.


john
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Make a copy of the data disks. Use Q2000 on the copies. Make sure you don't save over the orignal copies but rather the working copy.

I personally would NOT install an old copy of Quicken on MY working machine. Why ask for trouble when enough comes calling as it is? But I might install an old Q temporarily on someone else's machine (like one of my junior birdmen's machines, i.e., one of my kids' game machines).

glh
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Though a knowledgeable user may be confident the changes made to a file by a new version of QW are merely a matter of format codes, it's perfectly true to say the files have been "altered". And since Quicken will not allow the changes to be reversed or undone, one can also say with perfect truth that the files have been "irrevocably altered" or some such. That's not the kind of language you want to license when you're in litigation.
O.
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Though a knowledgeable user may be confident the changes made to a file by a new version of QW are merely a matter of format codes, it's perfectly true to say the files have been "altered". And since Quicken will not allow the changes to be reversed or undone, one can also say with perfect truth that the files have been "irrevocably altered" or some such. That's not the kind of language you want to license when you're in litigation.


For the rest of use users that may be involved in a similar situation (I don't know what it is) can you perhaps be a little less vague.

In what case(s) would a person what to use a Quicken file for litigation and what kinds of circumstances would be involved that would lead a user to what the data in a specific format or an unaltered format?

I respect the need for confidence but this may be of some use to other users to have certain items backed up in a specific way if it matters.

Regards,
john
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Along the lines of using Q in legal issues: I was told by a professional tax preparation service, that the last thing you would wnat to do during an IRS audit would be to bring your Quicken data to the audit. Why? Too much data open for line by line questioning. Much better to let the IRS try to piece together a case against you with sketchy bank records and "faulty" memory.

Actually, I would find it difficult to believe that user-generated data would be considered to be legally binding.

glh
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Actually, I would find it difficult to believe that user-generated data would be considered to be legally binding.

The user-generated data probably wouldn't be but if it leads to something else that is...

KennyO
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