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How did the cost to reupholster your couch compare to purchasing a new one?

Just curious.
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Sure!

Part of the problem was that I couldn't find a new sofa like the one I have now - so an apples to apples comparison is hard to make.

The less expensive sofas were made cheaply and the more expensive ones seemed geared toward a formal sitting room and the one I have is perfect for a casual living room - except that it's well made - (if that makes any sense).

Altogether, with fabric and labor, I paid $900 to have my sofa reupholstered.

I estimate that a new sofa of comparable quality, if it were available, would be around $2,200 - $2,500.

Of course, underneath it all, it is still an older sofa - but I'd still bet that it would last longer than a cheaper new one purchased today.

Hope I haven't confused you.

VL
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Thanks for the speedy reply. You haven't confused me, and I appreciate the information.

We have a comfortable older couch that is starting to look worn and we want to spruce it up a bit. We don't like the loose-fit slipcovers on the market, so that's out. I'm a pretty handy seamstress but am intimidated by the thought of making my own fitted slipcover for it. (Actually, I go back and forth: I can do this! I'm sure I can do this! I'll just get some bargain cotton duck and make my own slipcover. What a handy skill this would be to have. And then I chicken out and do nothing.)

Another option would be to have it reupholstered. However, this sofa only cost us $800 new, so I'm not sure it would be worth spending that much to have it reupholstered. It's certainly something to look into, though, especially if I can find my own quality fabric at a bargain price. And perhaps the labor here in the Midwest would be a bit less than in the DC area.

Thanks again.
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Another option would be to have it reupholstered. However, this sofa only cost us $800 new, so I'm not sure it would be worth spending that much to have it reupholstered. It's certainly something to look into, though, especially if I can find my own quality fabric at a bargain price. And perhaps the labor here in the Midwest would be a bit less than in the DC area.


I had a conversation recently about this very thing. If you spend (for sake of discussion) $900 to have your $800 couch reupholstered, you'll have a couch with a shape and size which you like and you'll have fabric (presumably) in a color and pattern that you love. You will also have a well-made sofa which will make you happy.

If you go to a furniture store, you will spend something more than $1000 to get an OK sofa with fabric that's the best of what's offered.

I'd vote to have the current sofa re-upholstered -- having something you love is pricelss.

I have 2 wing chairs -- one was quite inexpensive and OK but would win no prizes for construction and the other very expensive and well made. A friend told me that the first one isn't "worth" having reupholstered b/c it wasn't that expensive in the first place and I could get a comparable chair for less than the price for reupholstery. But I'd be left with one gorgeous chair and one so-so chair, so I'm opting to have both reupholstered so that I have 2 chairs which I love and treasure. I've already bought the fabric on Ebay.
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I'm a pretty handy seamstress but am intimidated by the thought of making my own fitted slipcover for it. (Actually, I go back and forth: I can do this! I'm sure I can do this! I'll just get some bargain cotton duck and make my own slipcover. What a handy skill this would be to have. And then I chicken out and do nothing.)

Hey Freelancer,

If I can do this you sure can. Its not a difficult job, just time-consuming. If you watch Trading Spaces you know the drill: Wrap the fabric around the couch inside out; pin to fit; and sew along the pin lines. Then cover the cushions.

Give it a try!
Mo.
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I agree that reupholstery makes sense if you really love the piece(s). I've decided to bite the bullet and pay the $15 surcharge to the upholsterer (DH is referring to this as the "corkage fee")because this way I will end up with exactly what I like. Plus I believe the savings on the fabric on EBay make this option viable.
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Altogether, with fabric and labor, I paid $900 to have my sofa reupholstered.

I estimate that a new sofa of comparable quality, if it were available, would be around $2,200 - $2,500.


That's what you really have to consider, if you'd rather keep the piece you already have or get a new one. We have two sofas in our family room. One is old -- as in 1825ish old -- and the other is your basic L-shaped sectional. We paid about $700 to have the old one reupholstered, and the craftsman rebuilt a couple of missing rungs. We don't even want to think about what buying something similar would cost, but it would be a lot more than $700. The sectional, though, is getting worn, and when it finally goes we're just going to buy a new one.

Uhura
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Another thought: www.surefit.com or www.bedbathandbeyond.com


IMO, commercially made slipcovers have gotten much more tasteful and tailored over the years.


I agree that upholstered furniture falls into its own category when it comes to purchasing, upgrading, etc.

The sofa I had reupholstered was purchased as a floor model for $500.
I've now sunk another $900 into it, but I couldn't find a new one as well made in a style I wanted - so there you go.

Good luck!


VL
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IMO, commercially made slipcovers have gotten much more tasteful and tailored over the years.

I second that. I've seen several of them and they look great! It's, also, nice when you can wash them, too!
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