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Author: ed1007 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 883676  
Subject: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 6:25 PM
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I know that some who frequent this board practice the legal profession. I need some help. Last week the van my mother was driving was crushed between two 18 wheeler trucks when an asphalt truck failed to stop at a railroad crossing. I have been asked to help find a lawyer to "help" my dad, but I have no idea how to go about it. Do I just yank out the phone book and start calling? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I already know to skip the guy that brought a bucket of chicken to the house while we were talking to the funeral home.

After I have located some likely candidates I would assume that a conversation/interview is in order. I have prepared a list of questions to ask when but I am sure that several important ones are missing. Again any help is appreciated.

If you are able go hug or call your mom.
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Author: Wessex99 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868563 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 7:32 PM
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I am so sorry that you have lost your mother. Peace and best wishes to you and your family.

As to your specific question, do you want the lawyer to help your father in a claim against the at-fault party or to help him with the financial/legal stuff of becoming a widower? I suspect it is the former, but often, you would want a different lawyer for each type of requirement.

Assuming you don't have any friends or co-workers who might be able to make a recommendation, you could try a local law school or legal aid society, either of which may have a referral service or check your State's bar association or lawyer regulatory body.

Here's a link to Nolo that has a discussion on finding a good lawyer:

http://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/find-lawyer-how-to-fi...

Wessex

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Author: ed1007 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868564 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 7:56 PM
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Wessex:

Thank you I will look closely at the link. Currently we are still in a bit of a shock. To be honest I had not thought about needing different lawyers for different issues.

The district prosecutor has asked the state police to investigate the crash, and the report that the driver of the truck jumped out without trying to stop. Does the family need to be involved in the criminal case, if one occurs? Do we need a separate lawyer to handle that issue? (I think not but we have never faced anything like this before.)

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Author: Wessex99 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868566 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 8:38 PM
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ed1007, I am not a criminal lawyer, so I would not be a reliable source for any real information, let alone legal advice, but in circumstances such as yours where no family members were involved in or would have knowledge of the accident itself, family members would likely only be involved in the actual trial, if at all, as sort of character witnesses for your mother and the emotional and financial impact on your family of her tragic death, prior to sentencing.

It is of course possible that one lawyer could handle both issues, but you need to be sure there is competence for both. Except in small communities, it is not so common for lawyers to be both plaintiff's personal injury lawyers and estate planning/probate lawyers.

Wessex

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Author: LOTROQueen Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868567 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 8:50 PM
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I have been asked to help find a lawyer to "help" my dad, but I have no idea how to go about it. Do I just yank out the phone book and start calling? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

This blog is written by a lawyer and this is a post about how to find one
http://www.popehat.com/2011/05/27/how-to-cold-call-a-lawyer-...

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Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868568 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 9:57 PM
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I have been asked to help find a lawyer to "help" my dad, but I have no idea how to go about it. Do I just yank out the phone book and start calling?

You might talk to your church’s priest/minister for a recommendation/advise. If they aren’t licensed to practice law, they probably have a lawyer that is retained by the church who can give you recommendations.

C.J.V.

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Author: Donna405 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868569 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/4/2012 11:26 PM
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Does your local Bar Association have a referral section? I would check on that. In addition, I would check with neighbors. You know, "word of mouth" can be the greatest of references.

Please accept my condolences to your and your Dad for the sudden loss of your mother. My prayers are with you both.

Donna

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Author: JonathanRoth Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868574 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/5/2012 9:36 AM
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Does the family need to be involved in the criminal case, if one occurs?

My condolences, I will spend a little more time with my mother.

The police and DA are very experienced in traffic death cases. If needed they will contact you.

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Author: WendyBG Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Winner! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868576 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/5/2012 12:52 PM
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What a terrible loss! I'm shocked and horrified by this awful accident! I'm so sorry to hear about your loss.

I don't know anything about lawyers, but I want to extend my heartfelt sympathy to you.

Wendy

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Author: jeffbrig Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868578 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/5/2012 1:49 PM
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First off, I'm very sorry to hear what happened.

The rest of my post is going to sound very cold and analytical, so I want to make that clear up front.

I am not a lawyer, but I do share a house with one. I'll offer a few suggestions after talking with her...

Look for a decent sized firm. You're talking about a wrongful death action, which tends to be bigger, longer, more drawn out. While a small firm might give you better face to face service, a solo practitioner may or may not have the resources to carry this case to trial. Especially if you get to where you need expert witnesses, traffic engineers, etc. A plaintiff's firm has to carry those costs until the case is tried or settled, so you don't necessarily want a small firm with limited resources.

On the flipside, too large a firm and you might end up speaking with a paralegal whenever you call. Ask up front what access you'll have to the attorney handling your case. For that matter, who is going to actually work on your case? The guy with his name on the door, some other partner or associate, or some kid that just passed the bar exam?

Experience is key, as with anything else. Ask what sort of experience they have with wrongful death cases, with vehicle accidents in general, and with commercial trucking. How did those cases go? Ask for references/testimonials from past clients on similar matters.

When you speak with a firm, evaluate how everyone treats you - attorney, support staff, receptionist, paralegal etc. These are the people you will be dealing with in the future. If you get a bad read on anyone, keep looking. Be especially sure you like the attorney you meet with. If your initial impression is not good, keep looking. (There are many kinds of attorneys out there. Some are flat out jerks to everyone. Some are jerks only when they need to be. Pick a personality type you can deal with.)

Also, try to get an idea of how they practice. What percentage of their cases do they typically take to trial? Are they be aggressive in pre-suit demands and pre-trial motions to try to force a quick settlement. Are they going to be looking out for your best interests, or do they churn through cases to generate fees? I would ideally find someone who settles the majority of their cases, but does also take cases to trial.

Ask how long they think the case will run. There is no right answer to that (could be months or years) but it gives you an idea of how they manage cases. Compare their case strategy to what you or your father want - trial, settlement, etc.

Ask about fees up front. They will take this case on contingency, but any award or settlement they will first take actual expenses (court fees, document fees, expert fees, etc.) off the top. Then they will typically take 30-40% of the net, depending on when the case settles.

Also, remember that plaintiff's firms make their money by closing cases. They don't make a dime while working on them, and they don't make a dime carrying them indefinitely. In fact, they are most profitable when they do as little work as possible on your case, and juggle as many other matters as they can manage.

Just remember that whatever happens, you and your father call the shots. You get to decide if you want to take a settlement offer. Don't let the attorney steer you into something you're not comfortable with. And if you don't like the working relationship, you are free to seek new representation and take your case elsewhere.

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Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868579 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/5/2012 3:08 PM
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Keep in mind that the owner of the truck is probably the one you will end up suing. The driver may have insurance but his assets and coverage may be limited.

One of your attorney's first expenses will be to learn who has assets and insurance on the other side and who to name in the suit.

So you end up working against the lawyers hired by the truck owners insurance company. They are experts. You need similar expertise to get the best results. Expect to be asked to accept a settlement. Fighting for a good settlement may take a while. If you are willing to accept a modest settlement, a local lawyer may be able to handle that part.

Keep in mind that your father's insurance company will be involved to recover their part. Probably damage to the vehicle, medical costs, etc. Your father will not want to sign anything until he hears from them. And be careful what you sign as any payment may require release from further liability.

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Author: desertdaveataol Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868581 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/5/2012 7:40 PM
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Thank you for recommending this post to our Best of feature.

And be careful what you sign as any payment may require release from further liability.

A common tactic. Best to require your lawyer look at ANYTHING the other side asks you to sign, especially checks.

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Author: desertdaveataol Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868582 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/5/2012 7:58 PM
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Once, while in the Army, I was broadsided by an Army dentist late for work. He was a nice guy, but I had to deal with his insurance company and they were anything but nice.

Since my car was totaled I had to walk everywhere. They took advantage of this stalling and hoping I'd sign anything to get some money to buy a new car.

I went to a lawyer who had a reputation as a bulldog. He forced the other side's representatives to get me a loaner car through a rental company. The original lease was for three days if I recall correctly.

They stalled some more and I just kept driving the rental car. This upset them to no end as now their stalling tactic was costing THEM money.

They started calling demanding I return the car immediately! I told them I had no other way to get around and would need the rental car until the settlement came through.

After a week and several angry phone calls they settled on our terms. Definitely get a good lawyer.

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Author: xtn Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868592 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/6/2012 3:50 PM
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And be careful what you sign as any payment may require release from further liability.

A common tactic. Best to require your lawyer look at ANYTHING the other side asks you to sign, especially checks.

Checks? I would think lawyers of all people ought to know that any language on a valid check other than the required info cannot be considered contractual.

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868593 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/6/2012 3:56 PM
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Checks? I would think lawyers of all people ought to know that any language on a valid check other than the required info cannot be considered contractual.

There are occasions when a check is attached to a piece of paper that says something to the effect of, "acceptance of this check qualifies as a release from all claims." It's not on the check itself, true, but signing the check can mean trouble. Best to check with the lawyer before signing the check.

Nancy

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Author: 2gifts Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868596 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/6/2012 4:16 PM
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There are occasions when a check is attached to a piece of paper that says something to the effect of, "acceptance of this check qualifies as a release from all claims." It's not on the check itself, true, but signing the check can mean trouble. Best to check with the lawyer before signing the check.


We've had people pay DH with checks with things noted in letters and/or memos and the lawyer has typically advised to just cross out any language on the check and cash it because we haven't agreed to it, and it is not binding. Note, however, that we did check with the lawyer first, so that is definitely something to be done.

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Author: xtn Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868601 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/6/2012 6:14 PM
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There are occasions when a check is attached to a piece of paper that says something to the effect of, "acceptance of this check qualifies as a release from all claims." It's not on the check itself, true, but signing the check can mean trouble. Best to check with the lawyer before signing the check.

It wouldn't be binding unless you sign a real release separately. A check cannot also be a contract.

Sure, it could be a lot of trouble to go through to fight it and get a court to finally back you up. But it's true.

xtn

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868602 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/6/2012 6:17 PM
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Sure, it could be a lot of trouble to go through to fight it and get a court to finally back you up. But it's true.

And wouldn't you save a lot of time and aggravation if you showed it to your lawyer first, which is the point of all of this?

Nancy

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Author: jeffbrig Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868603 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/7/2012 12:32 AM
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And wouldn't you save a lot of time and aggravation if you showed it to your lawyer first, which is the point of all of this?

It shouldn't even come to that - at least not in my state. Once you bring an attorney into the picture, the other side is not allowed to contact you directly - all dealing must go through the attorney. Settlement checks are cut to the attorney of record, go through their trust account, and they cut you a check after expenses/fees come off the top. And formal releases are typically created and signed as a condition for receiving the settlement check.

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Author: xtn Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868606 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/7/2012 11:07 AM
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And wouldn't you save a lot of time and aggravation if you showed it to your lawyer first, which is the point of all of this?

Nancy


I dunno. You're still either going to cash the check, which may result in a lot of time and aggravation, or you aren't. I don't see how reviewing it with a lawyer before hand is going to change anything.

xtn

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868612 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/7/2012 1:10 PM
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You're still either going to cash the check, which may result in a lot of time and aggravation, or you aren't. I don't see how reviewing it with a lawyer before hand is going to change anything.

Not necessarily. When you show it to the attorney he might send it back and tell the other side what needs to be done to make the check acceptable. So you might not deposit that check, and eventually you'll get a different check.

So, to clarify.

                     A) You and X have a disagreement.
B) X sends you a check.
|
__________________|_______________________
1) 2)
You deposit the check You show the check to the lawyer
| |
--------------------- -------------------------
1A 1B 2A 2B
No problem Problem He says it's fine He sends it back
| | |
Lots of time and money wasted No problem Eventual settlement


So out of the four scenarios, showing the check to the lawyer is the way to make sure you aren't going to get into trouble if you deposit the check. Wouldn't it make sense to show the check to the lawyer in order to avoid trouble?

Nancy

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Author: xtn Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868614 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/7/2012 2:17 PM
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So out of the four scenarios, showing the check to the lawyer is the way to make sure you aren't going to get into trouble if you deposit the check. Wouldn't it make sense to show the check to the lawyer in order to avoid trouble?

Nancy


Yes. That makes sense. Thanks.

xtn

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Author: sykesix Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868616 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/7/2012 11:59 PM
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There are occasions when a check is attached to a piece of paper that says something to the effect of, "acceptance of this check qualifies as a release from all claims." It's not on the check itself, true, but signing the check can mean trouble. Best to check with the lawyer before signing the check.

This.

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Author: ed1007 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868619 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/8/2012 12:49 PM
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Thank you for all with your help and suggestions. Again my main focus right now is to help my Dad figure out what is best.

My personal preference is to find a lawyer quickly, sue for as much as possible, and figure out what to settle for when the time comes. My Dad seems to hold some idea that the other drivers insurance company and his employer will offer a 'fair' settlement without having to involve the lawyers. It seems that as criminal charges are likely to be filed against eh other driver, and perhaps the owner of the other vehicle, the other insurance companies may make settlement offers quickly.

In the event that they do I am not sure what to advise my Dad to consider a "fair" settlement. My biggest concern right now is to replace her retirement benefits so that he will be able to continue to live in their home at at least his current standard of living as long as he wishes. I think that given her age that a lump sum of 25 times here yearly benefits would be the threshold.

Are there 'other' things to consider from a strictly financial perspective?

Again thank you all for your advice. Dealing with this seems to be the only thing I can focus on right now.

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868620 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/8/2012 3:25 PM
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My Dad seems to hold some idea that the other drivers insurance company and his employer will offer a 'fair' settlement without having to involve the lawyers

They will offer the rock-bottom minimum they can get away with. This is why you need a lawyer. A good lawyer will figure out what would be a fair settlement and work to get it. He or she will make sure that the loss of the benefits will not affect your father.

Look at it this way: the insurance company has a good lawyer whose job it is to save the company as much as possible and protect the company from large claims. This is his or her job. They do this every single day. If your father asks them for help, even though what's left of their conscience may writhe, they are required, not only by the insurance company but also the local, state and American bar associations to defend the company and protect it from a large payoff.

Your father needs a lawyer whose job it will be to help get the best deal possible.

I know this is a horrible time for you. I can't begin to imagine the kind of pain you're both in. But getting a good lawyer who will protect your father from the insurance company. At times like this it's hard to see beyond the next five minutes, and time seems warped. You and your father need help, and a lawyer can protect you from some of the problems you face.

LOTROQueen offered a link to the best advice I know. I think I'm the one who introduced her to Popehat, and the lawyer who wrote that advice was a federal prosecutor, and is now a state and federal defense and civil lawyer. He's had years of experience and knows what he's talking about.

I hope this offers some help.

Nancy

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Author: desertdaveataol Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868622 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/8/2012 6:20 PM
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In the event that they do I am not sure what to advise my Dad to consider a "fair" settlement.

An honest lawyer experienced in this area will know what a "fair" settlement is.

One thing you might try is to mention to the other side that you are considering going to a lawyer and see what their response it.

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Author: kahunacfa Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868690 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/12/2012 9:39 AM
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I know that some who frequent this board practice the legal profession. I need some help. Last week the van my mother was driving was crushed between two 18 wheeler trucks when an asphalt truck failed to stop at a railroad crossing. I have been asked to help find a lawyer to "help" my dad, but I have no idea how to go about it. Do I just yank out the phone book and start calling? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. I already know to skip the guy that brought a bucket of chicken to the house while we were talking to the funeral home.

After I have located some likely candidates I would assume that a conversation/interview is in order. I have prepared a list of questions to ask when but I am sure that several important ones are missing. Again any help is appreciated.

If you are able go hug or call your mom.
- ed1007 | Date: 11/4/2012 6:25:57 PM | Number: 868689

First sorry to hear about your Mother's accident. For your information Asphalt trucks and most commercial trucks in general and not and other trucks carrying passengers are NOT required to stop at railroad tracks in most States.

Your Mother is probably at fault in most states for rear-ending the asphalt truck. The truck that rear-ended her is at fault due to inattentive driving. -- Assuming the Van was insured, the insurance company should handle most of the property damage and any personal injuries that may have resulted under the rights of subrogration. Although the insurance company will handle part of the claim issues, your Mother should still seek the advice of her own attorney because her Insurance company will not specifically represent her in all respects of the case.

All Bar Associations have lawyer referral services. Most often, however, the attorneys they most often refer are those new attorneys who do not necessarily have well established legal practices. Friends, business associates, and sometimes other attorneys can usually be the best sources of referral as can be any Law Schools in your area. You did NOT mention what State the accident was in or your Mother's state of residence -- all essential and important information needed to possibly help you.

My daughter is an attorney; she only practices in several states and before the Supreme Court of the United States. She is NOT taking any new cases of any kind for the rest of 2012 and well into next year.

Kahuna, CFA
Venture Capital
Founding General
Partner 2012 - 2019

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Author: ed1007 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868691 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/12/2012 9:53 AM
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Kahuna:

As expected your response brightened my day. Perhaps I was not clear in my original post. Let me try again.

My mother was STOPPED behind one truck and beside another. All three, and several other vehicles as well in front of them, were stopped at a railroad crossing waiting for a passing train to finish using the tracks. My mothers car just happened to be the last in line. The asphalt truck in question did not stop, the driver instead choose to jump from the cab. The asphalt truck collided with my mother's van from behind and (and I use this term literally) crushed it against the truck in front of her, killing her, we pray, instantly. While asphalt trucks may not need to stop at railroad crossings it seems that it would have at least been recommended in this case.

While you most likely did not understand the nature of the incident from my earlier post, or perhaps my second or third, I trust that it makes more sense now. Thanks for letting me know your daughter is booked I can cross here off my list now.

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Author: eudaimon6 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868697 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/12/2012 1:31 PM
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Please accept my deepest condolences.

I am not an attorney, but my wife works for a large law firm that works for insurance companies defending personal injury cases. In other words, the trucking company's insurance company would hire the law firm my wife works for.

The firm my wife works for has been around for more than a century, has five offices in Illinois employing more than one hundred attorneys and nearly two hundred support staff. They have expert witnesses and resources and they are very successful at minimizing payouts for their clients. Regardless of where you are, it is likely that such a firm is on contract with the trucking company's insurance company.

Your father would be at a large disadvantage should he seek to get something resembling a fair settlement from such a firm. I hope this doesn't sound mean, but would he know a fair settlement were one presented to him? I know that I would not. If such a thing had happened to my wife, I would have no idea whether $50,000, or $500,000, or $5 million dollars were fair, or reasonable.

Grief is very tough. If it were me, I would be overwhelmed. I am glad to hear that you are available to assist your father in this very difficult process. Take your time. I imagine there is some sort of limit on the filing of claims, but it probably isn't 30 days.

Best wishes.

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Author: reallyalldone Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868698 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/12/2012 1:33 PM
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I imagine there is some sort of limit on the filing of claims, but it probably isn't 30 days.

There is and, for an example, in Colorado, it's two years after the death.

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Author: tconi Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868702 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/12/2012 2:04 PM
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As expected your response brightened my day.


you are an amazingly gracious man



peace & peace
t

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Author: Windowseat Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 868705 of 883676
Subject: Re: Questions to ask a lawyer Date: 11/12/2012 4:20 PM
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While asphalt trucks may not need to stop at railroad crossings it seems that it would have at least been recommended in this case.

For that sentence alone you deserve a rec.

Nancy

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