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If you avoid grains, do you eat quinoa?

I understand that it is technically a seed, but also understand that some who don't eat grains also avoid quinoa.
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If you avoid grains, do you eat quinoa?

I understand that it is technically a seed, but also understand that some who don't eat grains also avoid quinoa.



What is the rationale for cutting grains out 100%?

In any case, quinoa is considered to be a grain. Not in the classic family of corn/wheat/barley/millets/etc, which are defined as grasses. I think it's a pseudo-grass (or pseudo-something), a category that also includes buckwheat--which is in the smartweed family.


sheila
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...quinoa is considered to be a grain. Not in the classic family of corn/wheat/barley/millets/etc, which are defined as grasses...a category that also includes buckwheat--which is in the smartweed family.

Does it help improve "smarts"?

TB
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I suppose that the rationale for cutting them out 100% would be the effect on blood sugar.

2 people told me recently that they don't eat grains but do eat quinoa because of it's "high protein" content.
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Well, if it's high protein content we're talking about ......I have to 'fess up to eating meat, cheese, eggs, fish or other commonly recognised sources of protein.

I've given quinoa a shot and it sucks even better (or worse) than my Dyson!!!

I'd sooner try to fly a remote controlled stunt helicopter than eat quinoa.
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Well, that's what I'm thinking, too, vivienne. About the protein.

I did make a Moroccan quinoa and butternut squash stew last week that was pretty darned tasty.
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I suppose that the rationale for cutting them out 100% would be the effect on blood sugar.

2 people told me recently that they don't eat grains but do eat quinoa because of it's "high protein" content.



I'm not familiar with cutting out grains to control blood sugar. I haven't read anything about it, nor has it ever been among suggestions made on the integrative healthcare list I've belonged to for years--a list peopled primarily by physicians, including several who do a lot of work with diabetics.

I would think, instead, that cutting out certin grains makes a lot more sense. I personally eat almost no corn products, other than fresh corn in season. The glycemic index for corn is 75. Compare than to a fresh peach, which is 5. I don't eat white rice. Same as white flour--pretty much all significant nutritional value has been removed. And I have a gluten problem, so that exes out some that otherwise would be great.

Quinoa is a great protein source. So is hemp, which even though it's called hemp seed, it's actually a type of grain. (Same with flax.) And hemp has wonderful essential fatty acids too. (And flax.)

My view is to modify the grains in one's diet, keeping it to the really helpful ones.


sheila
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I've given quinoa a shot and it sucks even better (or worse) than my Dyson!!!

I'd sooner try to fly a remote controlled stunt helicopter than eat quinoa.



Depends on the brand, and how it's prepared. Quinoa ranges from inedible to the fantastic. It all depends.


sheila
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a Moroccan quinoa and butternut squash stew


Sounds delicious. Could you part with the recipe?


sheila
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I am seeing an integrative physician, one who studied with Donald Yance.

He's not big on grains of any kind. Next time I see him I'll ask more about why.

My visit wasn't about diet.
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a Moroccan quinoa and butternut squash stew


Sounds delicious. Could you part with the recipe?


sheila


It WAS delicious.

Found it at Epicurious.com. Moroccan Quinoa and Winter Vegetable Stew. It should come right up in a search.

If not, I'll post it!
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More specifically, it's Moroccan Quinoa Winter Squash and Carrot Stew.
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And I used red quinoa.

First time I've ever had quinoa.
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I am seeing an integrative physician, one who studied with Donald Yance.


Want to hear a bizarre coincidence? I JUST send off an email to Donnie!!! Haven't been in touch with him for quite some time, and I have some questions.
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**Found it at Epicurious.com.**


Thanks so much! I'll get it. It's a terrific website.
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**And I used red quinoa.**


I've never had red. Quinoa is very cute, with the little tails on the grains.
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I add quinoa to all sorts of items like pizza crusts but also make a chilli out of it. It's very popular in South America because it is a low cost high nutrition food.

And 2013 is .... "THE YEAR OF QUINOA"!!!.....
http://peruviancuisinefortheworld.com/web/?p=546
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And 2013 is .... "THE YEAR OF QUINOA"!!!.....
http://peruviancuisinefortheworld.com/web/?p=546


I wish that article had also included the recipe. That dish looks/sounds delicious!!

The odd thing, though, is that everything I've read about quinoa till now always cites Bolivia as being the major grower and exporter. I saw an article not long ago noting that quinoa has become so popular now that in Bolivia, where most of it is grown, what used to be a very cheap and plentiful source of protein and minerals is no longer easily available and has gone way up in price because the great bulk of the crop is now exported.

There's a Peruvian restaurant in my neighborhood that makes absolutely delicious quinoa dishes.


sheila
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It grows well at high altitude which is probably why it is so popular in Bolivia. "The undisputed queen of the Peruvian Andes" perhaps should read "The undisputed queen of the Andes"
... Wish I had a Peruvian restaurant in my hood.
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I understand that it is technically a seed, but also understand that some who don't eat grains also avoid quinoa.

All grains are seeds, so that distinction makes no sense. A strict definition of grains includes only cereals from certain grasses. If you use that definition, quinoa would not be a grain. Nor would amaranth. However if you're worried about how it reacts in the body, cooked quinoa has a pretty similar glycemic load as other cooked whole grains, except corn which has a much higher glycemic load.

DEG
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And speaking of quinoa..... I've discovered a quinoa pasta that is absolutely delicious. The brand is Ancient Harvest. Wonderful flavor and texture. For me, gluten-free, it's such a welcome find, doubly so because my husband really likes it too.


sheila
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I understand that it is technically a seed, but also understand that some who don't eat grains also avoid quinoa.

All grains are seeds, so that distinction makes no sense. A strict definition of grains includes only cereals from certain grasses. If you use that definition, quinoa would not be a grain. Nor would amaranth. However if you're worried about how it reacts in the body, cooked quinoa has a pretty similar glycemic load as other cooked whole grains, except corn which has a much higher glycemic load.

Guess I was reading the "strict definition" then. And yes, I did read the same about amaranth (wasn't convinced about that one, either).

I'm not worried, per se, just curious.

I'm on a one month trial of no grains AT ALL (per suggestion from my doctor) and after mentioning it to a friend I got all kinds of "well, quinoa isn't really a grain, it's loaded with protein", yada yada yada. (Found some "stuff on the internet" that agreed with her, but I wasn't convinced).

I'm waiting on nutrient and food allergy testing results which I'll know in a few weeks. Then I may put some grains back in, or not, depending.
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I'm waiting on nutrient and food allergy testing results which I'll know in a few weeks. Then I may put some grains back in, or not, depending.

Well, you could do that anyway....on the principle that the best outcome or measure of a *test* such as this is what you experience when you make your own adjustments
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Well, I COULD have done it anyway, but I'm interested in specifics, not just with regards to the (possible) effects of any particular grain on me, but those of other foods and nutrients.

I go back to doc next month.

One week yesterday I haven't let a single grain pass my lips.

And I'm here to tell you it was HARD passing by my favorite pizza place which just reopened RIGHT NEXT TO the Dance Studio where I take my Hoop Class!

I do think I'll be able to go back to a once in awhile pizza fix but for now, I'm staying away.
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