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Paraphrasing commentator Paul Harvey, perhaps these years could be simply stated as "the rest of our lives." Not as romantic, to be sure, as some titles, but for those with less financial opportunities or limitations of health, a realistic view that we have the responsibility to make the most of every day. We all have resources, no matter how limited, and the challenge and joy of living is to use them well on our own terms - not to emulate or compete with anyone else.

For those in poverty or pain, the concept of Golden or Jubilee Years can seem quite remote. And, when such a person compares his lot with the idealized retirees glowingly pictured in Modern Maturity, etc., the reaction is often one of bitterness and frustration. Yet, even within relatively limiting circumstances, there's the potential for happiness and fulfillment. With some soul-searching to discover what's really important to us, it's entirely possible to make the "rest of our lives," the "best of our lives."
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riverlad,

Thanks for the insightful post:

With some soul-searching to discover what's really important to us, it's entirely possible to make the "rest of our lives," the "best of our lives."

None of us know what the future holds. Many (if not most) of us are stretching our budgets to save and invest for a comfortable retirement. And even as we save, its possible to see one's "paper assets" begin to erode (as in the current market). A successful outcome might depend on our ability to change our focus from wealth to character development!

Wishing "the best of our lives" to myself and my fellow Guest Lecturers,
Craig
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<<<With some soul-searching to discover what's really important to us, it's entirely possible to make the "rest of our lives," the "best of our lives." >>>

And time can change what's important. When I was 40 I looked at the large, expensive houses many people my age and younger were buying with envy. But I had a goal of retirement by 60 and knew I couldn't afford both the big house and early retirement. So I fixed up the house I had over the years -- interior remodeling, a front porch, additional storage space, nice landscaping. I retired at 55, five years ahead of schedule.

Today, while an extra 500 sq ft would be nice, I'm quite happy with my house and my life. My friends are still making big mortgage payments and hoping maybe they can retire at 62.

I'm not planning for the future anymore. I'm living it and having a wonderful time!

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