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My youngest son is moving to NYC for a job at CUNY; thinking about Queens, Brooklyn of northern Manhattan for an apartment bigger than a closet that is affordable:) Any suggestions on neighborhoods, resources, etc? TIA!
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It really depends on his tastes. I love Brooklyn; I am closer to downtown now than I ever was on the UWS. If he will be working Midtown, Queens maybe makes some sense but I am biased by my burrough.

Being close to a train stop is critical. Being close to work is really nice, too. In Brooklyn, I would look near Prospect Park (Like Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, even maybe Ditmas Park) and then along the F line in Carroll Gardens and Cobble Hill (the hot name for that area is BoCoCa... Bo is for Boreum Hill I think). Brooklyn is quiet, clean and safe if you are smart about where you look.

My good friend used this site to decide where he wanted to buy his apartment:

http://www.brownstoner.com/

He read it daily for years before deciding on Prospect Heights, but maybe your son doesn't need that kind of certainty :)

IMO northern Manhattan is a bit overrated (especially the UES), and the Bronx is too far away to really live a NYC life. And as everybody knows, Staten Island can be eliminated out of hand.
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Which CUNY campus?

My daughter is content in South Harlem, which is gentrifying quickly. They have a very nice 1200 sq ft apartment a short walk to both Morningside and Central Parks. There's an organic butcher on Frederick Douglas between 115th and 116th, and a Whole Foods is supposedly opening on 125th @ Lenox--just indicators of change. Lots of restaurants, and cultural events at Columbia and St John the Divine. Still, it ain't Greenwich Village or Chelsea ;-)
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biased by my burrough.

Dude, wtf?

OCD: boro
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biased by my burrough.
-------------
Dude, wtf?
OCD: boro


Maybe he was actually biased by his burro--heehaw ;-)
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crap. I knew that.
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My youngest son is moving to NYC for a job at CUNY; thinking about Queens, Brooklyn of northern Manhattan for an apartment bigger than a closet that is affordable:) Any suggestions on neighborhoods, resources, etc? TIA!

Hi bl!

Whafa's post had some good suggestions.

If your son will be closer to midtown than downtown, Queens is a good idea as there are still some reasonable rentals there. I would suggest Astoria, Sunnyside or Long Island City (although LIC is still quite industrial).

Here's a good article from NY Magazine on neighborhoods:

http://nymag.com/realestate/neighborhoods/2010/65374/

The article is a couple of years old but still provides a lot of useful info.

Here's a general article about renting in NYC:

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2012/03/29/scoping_out_a_renta...

Good luck to him!

Christina
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OCD: boro


Ack-shoe-alley, it's "borough".

Christina
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OCD: boro


Ack-shoe-alley, it's "borough".

Christina
---

I already said that!

joey
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I already said that!

No...you said it was "boro".

Christina
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I already said that!

No...you said it was "boro".


"Boro" is a common abbreviated spelling for "borough," at least in Pennsylvania where I grew up.

Earble
(wishing he had a draught beer right now)
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I already said that!

No...you said it was "boro".

Christina


Ah, I see the confusion now.
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"Boro" is a common abbreviated spelling for "borough"

Hi Earble!

I'm aware of that, having grown up in Brooklyn -- where "Borough Hall" and the "Borough Hall subway station" are constantly referred to in the newspapers as "Boro Hall" and the "Boro Hall subway station".

a draught beer

Cute!

Christina
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Greenwich Village/Washington Square area is nice. So is the East side just North of the United Nations Building such as Beekman Tower..

Yes, those areas are nice -- and expensive.

Christina
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nice. So is the East side just North of the United Nations Building such as Beekman Tower


But far from being a neighborhood appropriate for a young person starting out, who has to be frugal in regard to rent, groceries, etc. And public transportation convenience is important too--and you sure don't find that just north of the UN.


sheila
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But far from being a neighborhood appropriate for a young person starting out, who has to be frugal in regard to rent, groceries, etc. And public transportation convenience is important too--and you sure don't find that just north of the UN.

What DO you find around the UN? It has always struck me as one of the most barren hoods in Manhattan. Is that Turtle Bay?
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What DO you find around the UN? It has always struck me as one of the most barren hoods in Manhattan. Is that Turtle Bay?


I know there's a lot of housing around there for people who are here short-term -- a few months, a few years. But would you believe I never realized that Turtle Bay actually refers to THAT neighborhood? So I'm glad you mentioned this. I've learned something. And it turns out that the UN was build in Turtle Bay.

Here's an interesting site I found:

http://turtlebay-nyc.org/


sheila
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Thanks to all for your input! He found a 2 bdrm near Sunset Park in Brooklyn....nice looking in a 3 unit building that costs what he's paying in DC, so he's happy. He's going to be about 45 minutes from work, which is the Graduate school across from the Empire State Building.
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What great experiences he's having as a young adult. Getting to live and work in DC and NYC.

Just a little envious, but very happy for him.

Chili
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...work, which is the Graduate school across from the Empire State Building.

Talk about being in the "heart" of Manhattan!!

Glad that he found an apartment he likes. (But a 45 minute commute may wear thin rather quickly!)

Christina
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(But a 45 minute commute may wear thin rather quickly!)

Back in the good old days I lived in New Jersey. I worked for the Berlitz School of Languages and at one time was promoted to a directorship and assigned to their school in Forest Hills, Queens.
This involved driving from Irvington, NJ to Maplewood and catching the train to Hoboken where I transferred to a train to take me to NY's Battery. From there it was the subway, the E and F trains. The trip took two hours and was repeated when I closed up the school in the evening.
That's four hours spent daily getting to and from work.
I loved the job, though.

Regards,
Grumpy
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His commute in DC was at least 30 minutes, so he's used to the commute; moving in 2 weeks!
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My husband commuted from Long Island to mid-town Manhattan for over 20 years. The trip was close to 2 hours - each way.
45 minutes would have been a breeze for him.
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My husband commuted from Long Island to mid-town Manhattan for over 20 years

When I was still living with my parents after college, I commuted from Queens to 59th street on the west side (where the Time Warner Center is now). Had to take a bus and a subway and walk a few blocks (or a bus and two subways). Took me over an hour.

When I was married and we lived in various parts of Queens, my commute always took me well over an hour.

Then I got divorced and moved to Manhattan. My "commute" took me about 5 minutes (walking). Then I got a job downtown and my commute took me about 30 minutes. Then I got a job midtown and my commute took me 10 -15 minutes (walking).

Now I work from home 3 days a week and my commute on the other 2 days takes me under 30 minutes.

Oh - I forgot to say that when I was in law school, I drove to work -- took me about 1-1/2 hours in the morning but less than an hour to return home after school.

Christina, used to commuting but prefers not to
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My husband commuted from Long Island to mid-town Manhattan for over 20 years. The trip was close to 2 hours - each way.

Ow! I hope it was on the LIRR and not in a car--at least then he could read, write, do crosswords, take a nap, or just relax.

I've read that long commutes are correlated with somewhat shorter lives, due I suppose to stress and lack of time for relaxation, exercise and maybe cooking. I had commutes of various lengths over the years, and I was definitely more tired and crankier with a long commute. Anything 45 minutes or less seemed OK. Anything over an hour felt horrible. We moved once to turn a 90-minute commute to a 45-minute one. And that involved selling a house.

These days, it seems more people change jobs more often, so even a good commute might not last. The last few years of my last job were entirely work at home save an annual visit to the office (we moved across the country for my husband's job, and they let me keep mine long-distance). The downsides of that were feeling disconnected from my workplace, partly due to absence of those spontaneous conversations/sources of info and social connection at lunch, before & after meetings and just in the hall. Plus my phone connections to meetings meant that I missed some of what was going on--and all the subtext. I'm happy to be retired!
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The downsides of that were feeling disconnected from my workplace, partly due to absence of those spontaneous conversations/sources of info and social connection at lunch, before & after meetings and just in the hall. Plus my phone connections to meetings meant that I missed some of what was going on--and all the subtext

That's why I like working from home 3 days a week and going to the office the other 2! As far as "meetings", I love being able to call in and then do whatever I want while listening but not having to sit there (pretending to listen and being able to do nothing else!)

I'm happy to be retired!

Good for you! I'm hoping to retire early next year.

Christina
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I'm hoping to retire early next year.

Good for you, too!
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