UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (33) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Author: CAMobley One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 737263  
Subject: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 2:08 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 5
The health care issue seems to come up fairly often. Just a reminder: those of you who've served in the military (longer than 180 days, usually, with a decent discharge) are eligible for free or low copay care from the Veterans Administration. I used to swear I'd never get military health care again, but I've got to admit that the VA in San Diego is pretty impressive. Appointments can take a while, but the care seems pretty decent after that. Copay on medications is $2. If you're a vet and getting treatment in the civilian community, you might consider getting into the VA system for that benefit alone.
180 days. Just a reminder.
Cyn
Print the post Back To Top
Author: cmorford Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45085 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 7:57 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
CAMobley said: Just a reminder: those of you who've served in the military (longer than 180 days, usually, with a decent discharge) are eligible for free or low copay care from the Veterans Administration.

Wow.

I can't believe I forgot that.

I thought the only benefit I had left was the VA guaranteed loans, which I've used twice...

Thanks for bringing this up!

Chuck - Ex-SSgt, USAF, 8 years...


Print the post Back To Top
Author: jtmitch Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45086 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 8:26 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Correct me if I am wrong (and I may be since I don't use the VA medical system), but doesn't the condition for which one can VA care have to be service connected ?

jtmitch

Print the post Back To Top
Author: cmorford Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45089 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 8:41 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
jmitch asked: Correct me if I am wrong (and I may be since I don't use the VA medical system), but doesn't the condition for which one can VA care have to be service connected ?

Apparently not....

I just went over to the VA website www.va.gov and read up on the eligibility requirements...

I fall into the lowest priority catagory...Catagory 7 (non-service related injuries/illnesses, ability to afford co-payments). Which requires 20% of reasonable charge co-pays for most everything...20% is better than 100%...

I'm sure there's some other restrictions, but I didn't see anything on the website...I'll do some more checking and find out...

Chuck

Print the post Back To Top
Author: Chipsboss Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45090 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 8:44 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
jtmitch asks about elibility for the VA medical system. The rules are complicated, and given in great detail at http://www.va.gov/customer/MEDCARFS.asp
That site runs to about 1500 words, and I don't see how to summarize its complexity. It describes the priority of veterans for the available VA medical service. Those priorities make sense to me, although I'm pretty sure that I wouldn't qualify, even with several years of Navy service. Higher priority veterans exhaust the available medical service before I could get any of it. I do not begrudge those veterans, especially the veterans of hazardous duty, their government-subsidized medical care.

the formerly sea-going Chips, whose major risk was acute boredom

Print the post Back To Top
Author: jtmitch Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45091 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 8:49 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
What you may find is that, depending on the particular VA hospital, this care may or may not actually be available. In other words, their resources maybe such that they can only realistically deal with categories 1 -3. Don't get me wrong - I think anyone who is eligible for the care and wants to go that route ought to; it's just that in my experience with these sorts of deals the lower priority categories, while technically eligible, ultimately find that they keep getting bumped by the highter categories. The result is that it's often not worth the hassle. And what's true at a VA hospital in California may not be true in Maryland, so it pays to check it out locally.

jtmitch

Print the post Back To Top
Author: MDGrabhorn Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45102 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 10:53 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
>>Correct me if I am wrong (and I may be since I don't use the VA medical system), but doesn't the condition for which one can VA care have to be service connected ?<<

No, the care does not have to be service related.

As CAMobley, this is often major OVERLOOKED benefit for prior members of the armed forces. But it can mean tremendous savings for those having to pay for prescription medication.

The short of it is, if you have EVER served in the military, pay a visit to the VA and see what benefits you are eligible to receive.

Good luck to you.

MDGrabhorn, CFP
www.pensionrecovery.com

Print the post Back To Top
Author: CAMobley One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45103 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 10:59 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
It's not just service connected illness or injury. For those, there's no copay. If you're 100% service connected or a POW for longer than 90 days, you also get free dental.

I've did 12 active, 14 reserve, no service connected disability and can get care at the San Diego VA. It's worth it to get in the system just for the prescription benefits.
Cyn


Print the post Back To Top
Author: CAMobley One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45104 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 11:01 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
Chuck, thanks so much for replying. I was HOPING that there might be someone out there who'd forgotten -- as I had.
It's not charity. Vets have earned it. Or would anyone like to stand another dog watch to be reminded of that? :)
Cyn

Print the post Back To Top
Author: Hunzi Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45105 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 11:04 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Also don't forget if you did your full 20yrs and retired from the military, you're also covered under Tricare which comes in several different forms, but one of the nicer benefits is there is now healthcare & prescription coverage for older veterans who were excluded because of Medicare: you can check into Tricare for Life.

Always ;-)
Hunzi
whose hubbie is retired military

Print the post Back To Top
Author: UncaMikey Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45108 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 11:18 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 28
It's not charity. Vets have earned it.

Isn't this really another example of how charity and welfare is in the eye of the beholder? Everyone, everywhere, from the CEO of the largest corporation to the poorest single parent, believes that what they receive from the government is their due. And in almost every case, they come up with a substantial argument that shows how the rest of us will be better off if they get that money.

Subsidized tuition at state universities, govt-supported R&D for industry, loopholes and breaks in the tax code -- they are all there because the recipients think they should have it, and convinced Congress and state legislators they should get it.

Please don't misunderstand me, I am one of the few liberals who posts on REHP. <GGGG> But this is one of the govt programs that I think is bloated and overfunded and mismanaged.

I am a veteran, too, and thus "earned" that VA benefit a long time ago, but I don't think it's a proper use of govt money. For service-connected disabilities, perhaps. But other medical care? And cheap drugs? Serve for 180 days and you get cheap medical care for life? If the cost to veterans is so cheap, it's because the rest of the country is picking up the difference.

But I know it won't go away: SS has the AARP, and the VA has the AL and VFW. Each of us is part of some 'special interest group.'

*>UncaMikey

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: cmorford Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45110 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 11:30 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
CAMobley said: Or would anyone like to stand another dog watch to be reminded of that?

No thanks!

Ya know, a lot of people think us "Wingnuts" had/have it easy...
I guess most of the time that's not far off the mark.

But then I remember 18 hours in full chem-warfare gear, nothing to drink or eat, day after day, for weeks...

And, 3am in a muddy foxhole, temperature barely above freezing, in the pouring rain, cradling my M-79. All this after a 12 hour duty shift...

Or months in the Saudi desert...temps in the triple digits...

This is the Air Force? Yup...Data Systems Maintenance Unit, 726th Tactical Control Squadron, 407th Tactical Air Control Wing, 9th Air Force...

I wouldn't trade a minute of it...

Chuck








Print the post Back To Top
Author: Pablum Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45159 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 2:32 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
CAMobley wrote:
<<It's not charity. Vets have earned it.>>

Actually, the various goodies handed out by the veterans administration are collectively another one of those budgetary ticking time bombs that flies just under the radar.

Do vets earn it? I think most people, myself included, think of veterans as those who served in a war. For those people I certainly do believe they earned it by putting their lives in harms way, particularly those who come back wounded. This country ought to do all it can for them.

But that definition does not include all those who served in the military. I don't see how anyone earns the various veterans benefits just by doing a tour of duty. If they should become injured or disabled while serving, even if not at war, fine, but otherwise those who serve and never see war in my mind are not veterans deserving special benefits.

This distinction and limitation might be one way to trim this particular entitlement---which one day will likely become necessary.

Having said this, I think it's fine for former enlistees (ie anyone on this board) trying to get whatever benefits are legally available to them. Why should recipients of this entitlement act any differently than recipients of any other entitlement? That's why its tough to get rid of entitlements; you have to whack them all if you're going to whack one.

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: telegraph Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45162 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 2:44 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 5

"Do vets earn it? I think most people, myself included, think of veterans as those who served in a war. For those people I certainly do believe they earned it by putting their lives in harms way, particularly those who come back wounded. This country ought to do all it can for them.

But that definition does not include all those who served in the military. I don't see how anyone earns the various veterans benefits just by doing a tour of duty. If they should become injured or disabled while serving, even if not at war, fine, but otherwise those who serve and never see war in my mind are not veterans deserving special benefits


Ah, but the devil is in the details! Is the guy who loaded the ammo ship in the states, never having seen 'war', deserving? Or was on the ammo ship as it sailed the ocean? What about the people in training camp teaching recruits how to throw hand grenades, and having panic moments when the recruit drops the live grenade rather than throwing it? In that case, they could get wiped out by 'friendlies'.

Or those who served 'overseas' but never saw an enemy, such as 80% of all overseas folks who are 'support' people? How about those marines who serve in embassies, some of which occasionally get killed by terrorist bomb? Or on UN Peace Keeping missions (which aren't 'wars').

If the promise was made to all who enlisted/were drafted that they would receive lifetime medical benefits if they served out their tours of duty, then it is hard to argue that they suddenly have to give up that up.

One of the supposed benefits to make up for typically smaller than comparable industry salary was the promise of future benefits (PX, medical, retirement pay, etc).


Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: jtmitch Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45165 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 3:07 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3
If the promise was made to all who enlisted/were drafted that they would receive lifetime medical benefits if they served out their tours of duty, then it is hard to argue that they suddenly have to give up that up.

One of the supposed benefits to make up for typically smaller than comparable industry salary was the promise of future benefits (PX, medical, retirement pay, etc).


I think we need to clarify a few points here....

- The implied promise of lifetime medical benefits is generally understood to be for those who served at least 20 years and retired. (Or for those who were retired prior to 20 years under fairly limited circumstances.) This health care is generally provided through the military medical system or through an HMO/Insurance program called TriCare, not through the VA.
- I don't think there was ever an understanding that someone who served a tour of duty (generally 2 - 4 years but theoretically as many as 19 -- that is, short of retirement) was entitled to lifetime health care (except for the "service connected disabilities" which have been previously discussed here).

The Category 7 access to VA health benefits for vets who don't fit one of the first 6 categories is essentially a "space available" access if there is capacity left over after treating the other 6 and, as I said in an earlier post, I'm sure not very people get care this way.

jtmitch

Disclosures:
1. Retired from the military and entitled to "lifetime health care"
2. I currently don't use it.

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: mrhowell Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45174 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 3:46 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
jtmitch is correct. The "lifetime medical bennies" thing is reserved for honourably RETIRED veterans. This means 20yrs OR sooner if retired for medical reasons. (with a few other exceptions)The VA will only take care of your bad knee if that was your reason for being medically retired but if you become diabetic or develop heart problems they don't handle that.

The fact that they will handle some vets on a space available basis is because some yrs ago that "homeless veterans" thing got a lot of play on TV. It was a PC move. Also with a shrinking pool of veterans the VA Empire didn't want to lose ANY FUNDING. So,they came up with the plan that they'd treat the "other kind" of veterans. ie , the non service connected disability kind. The PX and other "bennies" available ONLY to Active Duty people did this too. With fewer military people after the Gulf War they were afraid their money would dry up or, God forbid, be reduced. So, they expanded access for National Guard and Reserve people even when they were not "on duty" just to keep themsleves in business.

Also, people who retire from the military with less than 30 yrs are considered to be still "available for duty". They are not retire and their pension is not a pension, strictly speaking untill they reach the point where they would have had 30 yrs on active duty. It is legally considered reduced compensation for reduced services. So, the employer (The feds) is just making medical insurance available to these people and underwriting the cost of the policy. (That TRICARE think jtmitch mentioned) Too lucrative? Perhaps but consider that in your late 40's early 50's, after 30 yrs or so, many of us are uninsurable and we do not have 20 or more yrs as a good, "premiums paying" customer with a regular insurance company. AND while on Active Duty we are forbidden to get regular, normal civilian insurance or medical care. Everything must be administered or approved/referred by the Military. So there's no way we can cover that contingency for our later yrs.

(That's why I am dead set against any kind of Socialized Medicine/Single Payer sh*t. If civilians had to accept the kind of medical care the Active Duty military has,... well they just wouldn't accept it!)

*************************
>>>>If the promise was made to all who enlisted/were drafted that they would receive lifetime medical benefits if they served out their tours of duty, then it is hard to argue that they suddenly have to give up that up.

One of the supposed benefits to make up for typically smaller than comparable industry salary was the promise of future benefits (PX, medical, retirement pay, etc).<<<<<<<<

I think we need to clarify a few points here....

- The implied promise of lifetime medical benefits is generally understood to be for those who served at least 20 years and retired. (Or for those who were retired prior to 20 years under fairly limited circumstances.) This health care is generally provided through the military medical system or through an HMO/Insurance program called TriCare, not through the VA.
- I don't think there was ever an understanding that someone who served a tour of duty (generally 2 - 4 years but theoretically as many as 19 -- that is, short of retirement) was entitled to lifetime health care (except for the "service connected disabilities" which have been previously discussed here).

The Category 7 access to VA health benefits for vets who don't fit one of the first 6 categories is essentially a "space available" access if there is capacity left over after treating the other 6 and, as I said in an earlier post, I'm sure not very people get care this way.

jtmitch

Disclosures:
1. Retired from the military and entitled to "lifetime health care"
2. I currently don't use it.

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: golfwaymore Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45175 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 3:46 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 31
I am a veteran, too, and thus "earned" that VA benefit a long time ago, but I don't think it's a proper use of govt money. For service-connected disabilities, perhaps. But other medical care? And cheap drugs? Serve for 180 days and you get cheap medical care for life? If the cost to veterans is so cheap, it's because the rest of the country is picking up the difference.

I'm not a vet, but I suppose I'm willing to pick up the difference.

I'm one of the "small gov't" stalwarts here, but I dont see the military or VA in the same light as entitlement programs and special interests.

By joining the military, you are saying that for X period of time, if it comes down to it, I'm willing to pay the ultimate price, to protect the rest of you who might not. How many of us have/would say that?

Take away everything there is in the world from the civilizations, and the reality is that while primative, ability to prevail in a conflict is all that is left.

The men/women who enable that mechanism/safety net can have such a benefit at my expense, as far as I'm concerned.

Golfwaymore






Print the post Back To Top
Author: CAMobley One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45178 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 4:10 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3

<<By joining the military, you are saying that for X period of time, if <<it comes down to it, I'm willing to pay the ultimate price, to <<protect the rest of you who might not. How many of us have/would say <<that?

Bingo.

Personally, I use the VA for some things. I also have private health insurance, and the VA collects its reasonable and customary from them. For me, it's a matter of being out of pocket less on the deductibles AND funneling my health dollars into a system that will take care of veterans.

Didn't intend to start a policy argument -- just wanted to remind some of you worried about health care that you may have this option. It sure was made clear to me prior to enlisting that VA care would be available on a space A basis, just as the GI bill and home loan benefits were.

Full disclosure: 12 active, 14 reserve. USNR, ret.
Cyn

Print the post Back To Top
Author: UncaMikey Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45179 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 4:11 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 9
golfwaymore said:

I'm one of the "small gov't" stalwarts here, but I dont see the military or VA in the same light as entitlement programs and special interests.

One of the things that makes me smile about this particular group REHP is the surprises that prove that beneath all the ideology and rhetoric we try to be reasonable folks.

Golfwaymore and I seldom agree about the role of government and level of taxation, but here you go: he, a non-vet, is in favor of keeping this government spending, while I, the combat vet, think that it is wasteful use of tax dollars.

Perhaps we could agree the system could be changed? A respected person I know said that WWII spawned the best and the worst government programs. The best was the GI Bill, which gave veterans vouchers to use at whatever the school they liked, and was responsible for the explosive growth in US educational attainment levels in the 50s and 60s. The worst was the VA, a system of government hospitals and doctors.

In any event, thanks again golfwaymore; my disagreement is respectful and my smile is quite genuine.

*>UncaMikey

Print the post Back To Top
Author: jblunt Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45181 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 4:14 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
"But other medical care? And cheap drugs? Serve for 180 days and you get cheap medical care for life? If the cost to veterans is so cheap, it's because the rest of the country is picking up the difference."

While it is theoretically possible for a vet (I think you have to serve 2 years) to get medical benefits, it is not all that common for most who haven't served until retirement or who don't have a service related disability.

Several years ago, the VA started means testing people, so those who get care now who don't fit the categories above are generally people with very little income/assets who in many cases would probably get free care anyway through Medicaid.

jb



Print the post Back To Top
Author: mrhowell Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45185 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 4:42 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
The PX and certain other on-Base activities are not exclusive to Active Duty folks. Retirees are also eligible to use them and always have been.

**********************
mrhowell mistakenly said....

>>>> The PX and other "bennies" available ONLY to Active Duty people did this too. With fewer military people after the Gulf War they were afraid their money would dry up or, God forbid, be reduced. So, they expanded access for National Guard and Reserve people even when they were not "on duty" just to keep themsleves in business.<<<<<<





Print the post Back To Top
Author: mpkear Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45250 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 10:40 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 7
By joining the military, you are saying that for X period of time, if it comes down to it, I'm willing to pay the ultimate price, to protect the rest of you who might not. How many of us have/would say that?

You just hit the nail on the head. 9 1/2 years in the Navy for me. Some have criticized me for not going 20. Others wonder why I stayed so long.

Now, I wasn't in WWI or WWII or Vietnam or Korea. I did serve for 2 1/2 years in Panama and can tell you stories about dealing with the PDF. I've seen the rockets red glare. Granted, I've never fired a weapon at someone, but I've had one pointed at me. I was an Electronics Technician so I wasn't trained to be a grunt.

Now, my Panamain born spouse can tell you stories about being in an apartment with the dignity battalion on the roof firing at American helicopters and the Americans firing back.

Hell, young and dumb at 19. I would have given my life for my country. Still the same at 33. I have more to live for now, but if my country needs me I will go.

Hopefully though, I can stay home and watch my youngun's grow up. At the same time I will keep my affiliation with the Navy and continue to do my courses and earn my retirement points.

Mark


Print the post Back To Top
Author: janicedowden One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45260 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 11:48 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 2
Cyn wrote about "free or low copay care from the Veterans Administration". This was a (literal) life-saver for my nephew. He was unemployed for a few months and did not have medical insurance. He could not aford the COBRA medical. For $50 per visit, he received excellent health care in Fort Worth, Texas VA Clinic, and then got his heart medication for $2 per prescription.
Note: Under his previous group health coverage, he was paying in excess of $100/month for his deductible cost on prescriptions.
He is working again, but is seriously considering continuing to use VA just for the prescription benefit.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: janicedowden One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45261 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/12/2001 11:51 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
doesn't the condition for which one can VA care have to be service connected ?

The medical care and prescriptions for service-connected disorders are less expensive (they may even be free, I don't recall), but your health problem need NOT be service-connected to use VA resources. If your health problem is not service-connected, you are just issued a different classification, and charged differently - you still receive care.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: markr33 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45271 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 2:47 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 3
<<I'm one of the "small gov't" stalwarts here, but I dont see the military or VA in the same light as entitlement programs and special interests.>>

One of the things that makes me smile about this particular group REHP is the surprises that prove that beneath all the ideology and rhetoric we try to be reasonable folks.


I am also a small government proponent, yet still think that veterans should receive certain benefits.

I think a more fair solution would be as such:

2 years in service ... 10% of Veteran benefits
4 years in service ... 20% of Veteran benefits
...
20 years in service ... 100% of Veteran benefits.

Of course, with the current rules on injury and disability remaining in place !


Print the post Back To Top
Author: johnmoni Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45284 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 8:19 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 43
"I am a veteran, too, and thus "earned" that VA benefit a long time ago, but I don't think it's a proper use of govt money. For service-connected disabilities, perhaps. But other medical care? And cheap drugs? Serve for 180 days and you get cheap medical care for life? If the cost to veterans is so cheap, it's because the rest of the country is picking up the difference."

My mother works for a federal agency, and as a widow of a disabled veteran, gets what they call a "10 point preference" in terms of personnel actions. Basically what it means she gets some preferential treatment in terms of layoffs, etc. There are a number of her younger co-workers who are extremely jealous of her having that "perk." Well my Dad landed on Normandy beach on D-Day and was wounded by a German shell being fired from the bluffs above the beach. He was one of the lucky ones, because I found out many years later from my Mom (he never told us kids) that he saw many guys drown during the landing, because the landing craft door was stuck and they had to go over the side and swim to the beach with their backpack on. He also said that the ocean was red with blood, with many body parts floating all around him. So any time anyone questions whether my Mom deserves that benefit, I tell them the story. I usually don't get any reply. Tip your hat to a veteran today - my Dad, all the ones who didn't come back, and their spouses deserve every benefit available to them.
johnmoni

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: BobBluff Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45285 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 8:34 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 4
Congratulations to Golfwaymore and UncaMikey for demonstrating that the pols cannot put individuals into a box and label them Republicans, Demoncrats, Liberals, Conservatives, ad naseum.

I suspect most of us, while me might have some "general" feelings or beliefs, cross the line many times when we look at various important topics or events. Just because I might be a fiscal conservative does not mean that I cannot be more liberal with some social concerns.

Further, they demonstrate that intelligent people can and do openly discuss issues on which they may disagree, but do so in a manner that seeks to find solutions to problems, not demonize each other.

Gentlemen, you have made my day. Thanks

BB

Print the post Back To Top
Author: READLA95 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45341 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 4:15 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 7
Tip your hat to a veteran today - my Dad, all the ones who didn't come back, and their spouses deserve every benefit available to them.
johnmoni


Wish I could rec this more than once...

Honor to your Dad and all others with him that day. The Men in my family have all Served. I feel that there is no way the rest of us Civilians can ever repay what they have done for the rest of us. I will gladly pay for VA benefits anytime, whether or not it is for a service injury or something later. Those people put their lives on the line as their Duty. Whether or not people like the Conditions in the US today, it is because of those men, and others in later generations that we still are Free, and not part of the Third Reich speaking German under Hitler's 1000 year reign, or some other deranged madman.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: johnmoni Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45343 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 4:26 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
"Whether or not people like the Conditions in the US today, it is because of those men, and others in later generations that we still are Free, and not part of the Third Reich speaking German under Hitler's 1000 year reign, or some other deranged madman."

Amen

Print the post Back To Top
Author: FlyingCircus Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45357 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 6:09 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 5
It's not charity. Vets have earned it.

Isn't this really another example of how charity and welfare is in the eye of the beholder? Everyone, everywhere, from the CEO of the largest
corporation to the poorest single parent, believes that what they receive from the government is their due. And in almost every case, they come
up with a substantial argument that shows how the rest of us will be better off if they get that money.


UncaMikey by inference here puts veterans in a pool with every other interest group, and sets up an extreme example as a straw man to prove the point.

As the DDay reply to this post more directly points out, we cannot draw comparisons between veterans (and their spouses) and any other group. Veterans of any service, especially combat service, need to be treated as an elite group of rare individuals who were willing to sacrifice themselves for their country - yes this is a generalization, but fair. Not many people, myself included, can claim that as a character trait. Of course some vets will get preferential treatment without really earning it - so does every group.

But in general, they're the ones who put themselves out there to protect the freedom the rest of us have to, among living the way we do, post whatever (increasing) drivel we want to on message boards. If there's any special interest group that deserves a benefit, they're it.

FC

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: UncaMikey Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45360 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/13/2001 6:48 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 11
UncaMikey by inference here puts veterans in a pool with every other interest group, and sets up an extreme example as a straw man to prove the point.

...Veterans of any service, especially combat service, need to be treated as an elite group of rare individuals who were willing to sacrifice themselves for their country


I am sorry you saw my argument as a straw man, but I want to say thanks for the way you characterized my military service (yes, in combat, in harm's way).

I don't think I or similar vets deserve special treatment. Where does one draw the line? You know who I think deserves special treatment? My mom. Both of her sons were in the service, both served in Viet Nam. My brother died 5 years ago (not service connected) so now it's just me.

All during our service she had to watch the evening news and see the reports and wonder if we were still alive.

Her reward? Not much. I am embarrassed by the smallness of her SS check. I can't help her much financially, because if I do, she will lose the other (non-SS) benefits that many here would characterize as 'welfare' and 'handouts'. She made some bad choices, perhaps, but never earned much, and has very little now. Many will have no sympathy for her, because she is simply reaping the results of her poor financial decisions.

But I would transfer all my benefits, and then some, to her, in an instant, if I could.

I don't like putting veterans or seniors or any other special interest group above the others. Everyone, in some way or another, is special and deserves our attention and empathy.

*>UncaMikey

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: cmr2fool One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45392 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/14/2001 10:19 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 4
It's not charity. Vets have earned it.

Isn't this really another example of how charity and welfare is in the eye of the beholder? Everyone, everywhere, from the CEO of the largest corporation to the poorest single parent, believes that what they receive from the government is their due. And in almost every case, they come up with a substantial argument that shows how the rest of us will be better off if they get that money.

Subsidized tuition at state universities, govt-supported R&D for industry, loopholes and breaks in the tax code -- they are all there because the recipients think they should have it, and convinced Congress and state legislators they should get it.

Please don't misunderstand me, I am one of the few liberals who posts on REHP. <GGGG> But this is one of the govt programs that I think is bloated and overfunded and mismanaged.

I am a veteran, too, and thus "earned" that VA benefit a long time ago, but I don't think it's a proper use of govt money. For service-connected disabilities, perhaps. But other medical care? And cheap drugs? Serve for 180 days and you get cheap medical care for life? If the cost to veterans is so cheap, it's because the rest of the country is picking up the difference.

But I know it won't go away: SS has the AARP, and the VA has the AL and VFW. Each of us is part of some 'special interest group.'

*>UncaMikey

===============================

Wow! 26 recs at the time I added mine. Pretty good for a self-proclaimed liberal <grin>. I'm not really one of you, but I absolutely agree with you on this one.

I truly admire the thinking of many (most?) of the regular participants on this board, at least as it pertains to personal financial matters. But some of them, when certain subjects arise and they reflexively launch into their "conservative cant" mode, blaming absolutely every societal ill on excessive government regulation, excessive taxes, and of course the ever-popular "welfare chiselers," would do well to ponder Pogo's assertion:

We have met the enemy, and he is us...

Regards,
cmr2fool
a Vietnam veteran (1st Air Cav) and self-proclaimed fervent moderate
(who looks forward to lots of civil discourse with self-proclaimed conservatives)


Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: cmr2fool One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 45393 of 737263
Subject: Re: RE Veterans Date: 7/14/2001 10:40 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll . Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
We have met the enemy, and he is us...

Regards,
cmr2fool
a Vietnam veteran (1st Air Cav) and self-proclaimed fervent moderate
(who looks forward to lots of civil discourse with self-proclaimed conservatives)

============================

In rereading my last post, I think I need to add the following disclosure. I used my GI Bill benefits (I agree with a previous poster to the thread that this benefit ranks right at the top of the value scale) to help offset the cost of two college degrees. I also used my VA benefits to obtain the mortgage on the house I live in at present.

But I had a LOT less money then than I do now. So, while I certainly don't condemn REHPers for seeking every benefit to which they believe themselves entitled, perhaps some benefits should be means-tested.

I don't agree at all with the posters who stated that benefits should be based on whether you were a combat veteran or actually spent time in a war zone. Many of us who served had little control over where and when. In that respect, we were victims of history.

Regards,
cmr2fool


Print the post Back To Top
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (33) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Advertisement