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Author: jgc123 Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 62040  
Subject: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 10:07 AM
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After all, that was the original purpose of this board...
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Author: GusSmed Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4611 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 10:54 AM
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I expect a certain amount of noise to be normal here. It certainly was on REHP before it became RWCJ, and it wasn't really a problem before the sea change. Now and then we'll get relevant posts. The trick is to keeping the noise from becoming unpleasant enough that we stop reading the board, and thus miss the few posts that are actually relevant.

- Gus

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Author: malibu114 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4619 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 2:35 PM
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My biggest issue will be healthcare costs. My plan is to retire I plan to retire around the age of 55 which is just about 20 years from now. I planned my savings rates accordingly and have even used a conservative rate of return when projecting, but I have no idea how much healthcare will cost n 20 years.

Donna

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Author: telegraph Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4620 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 2:58 PM
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Healthcare will probably cost a bunch in 20 years...

The dems will likely win, and as Hillary says, it will be the end of her second term before there is 'national health care'....

It will last about 10 years before it goes bust, just like Medicaare and 'prescription drugs' and everything else that has costs that will escalate to the moon....

So in 20 years, you will be back on your own....

TN system just went bust.....think several others are teetering on the brink.....


t.



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Author: alaskack Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4621 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 3:12 PM
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My biggest issue will be healthcare costs. My plan is to retire I plan to retire around the age of 55 which is just about 20 years from now. I planned my savings rates accordingly and have even used a conservative rate of return when projecting, but I have no idea how much healthcare will cost n 20 years.

This is the main reason why my retirement will be at 60 (when retirement coverage starts). For planning purposes, I'd use what it's current cost is and inflate it at your standard inflation rate. What I figure will happen is you'll end up buying whatever policy this planned budget expense will cover, probably higher deductables and co-pays. You'll also need to plan for saving an amount to cover these higher expenses, say 2-3 years worth, so it won't such a big amount an an annual budget for replenishment.

Calvin

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Author: jgc123 Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4631 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 4:23 PM
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"My biggest issue will be healthcare costs."

I am thinking about refusing healthcare for as long as I can stand it and then blowing my brains out.

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Author: SeattlePioneer Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4633 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 5:13 PM
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<<I am thinking about refusing healthcare for as long as I can stand it and then blowing my brains out.

>>



Assisted suicide = Baby boomer's pension system

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4634 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 5:23 PM
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My biggest issue will be healthcare costs. My plan is to retire I plan to retire around the age of 55 which is just about 20 years from now. I planned my savings rates accordingly and have even used a conservative rate of return when projecting, but I have no idea how much healthcare will cost n 20 years.

Donna


It will be for many of us. Using intercst's GenX calculater, with my income growing modestly and with 10% investment growth, I can most likely FIRE in 8 years when I'm 53.

The big "IF" is health care costs.

My personal plan to combat the lion's share of health care costs is to be as healthy as physically possible. As a vegan, who eats 85% of of his food raw (with DW struggling to follow along), the risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and just about every other life destroying diseases is very low.

I plan on getting a "high deductable catastrophic" health insurance policy and using some of my investments to meet the deductable if necessary in case of an accident.

Intercst recommended a plan a few years back on REHP to invest that portion in health care stocks. I took that to heart and have a minor position in a few. So far, so good.

Anyhoots! That's one idea and approach.

decath

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4640 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 5:53 PM
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I am thinking about refusing healthcare for as long as I can stand it and then blowing my brains out. - jgc123
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What I'm afraid of is that there may be spiritual consequences to suicide. It has to do with that connectedness and oneness thing that so many near death experiencers talk about. You feel the pain and suffering and grief you cause/d to your loved ones who are left behind. If your loved ones mourn your passing, you may feel their grief and despair, like if they blame themselves for your suicide.

from The Life Review:
"Instantly becoming everyone you came in contact with in your entire life (feeling their emotions, thinking their thoughts, living their experiences, learning their motives behind their actions)."

http://near-death.com/experiences/research24.html

Artie


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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4641 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 5:58 PM
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My personal plan to combat the lion's share of health care costs is to be as healthy as physically possible. As a vegan, who eats 85% of of his food raw (with DW struggling to follow along), the risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes and just about every other life destroying diseases is very low. - decath
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Good luck with that Decath. I honestly mean that. You've got kids so I hope you and your wife live to see great-grandchildren. I hope your plans work out the way you hope.

Woody Allen Quote:
"If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans"
"If you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans"· .Old Proverb. Mine is a quirky, playful deity-more like an eleven-year-old boy than a wise and ...
http://www.danenet.wicip.org/tlna/web-data/news/news05/0500davi.html

Artie



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Author: tootru Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4642 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 6:03 PM
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As a vegan, who eats 85% of of his food raw

I'm just curious, Decath, how you came to this decision. Not a lot of conservatives I know are very interested in a plant based diet. What convinced you? Books? Your doctor? Friends? Family?

My disclaimer - long time vegan (the ethical sort, not the strict vegetarian for health sort).

I'm always interested in people's stories around how they decided to make a switch. Please don't think I'm baiting you ... I am genuinely curious. I also live with an omnivore who has health problems, and I'd sure like to keep him around for long past retirement (early or otherwise) and wouldn't mind hearing how your DW is handling this (or how you are handling this in the face of potential reluctance from your DW)

Regards,
t.

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Author: jgc123 Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4643 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 6:07 PM
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Artie: "What I'm afraid of is that there may be spiritual consequences to suicide."

On the one hand, as far as I can tell, when I die, I die - just like every other animal that ever lived and died and ever will. If my suffering is too great for me to bear, and I am of sound mind, I hope others will respect my autonomy on that last, final, personal decision.

However, I was mostly joking anyway because I do believe that there are very real consequences in the sense that such an act would hurt my loved ones. Only if my parents and remaining brother and wife were long gone, and only if I was really so old or so sick that all I could feel was pain, and I could no longer see the smiles or hear the laughter of my grandchildren, and all I had left has was the final gasps of a dying, decaying body, I would hope I would receive the same courtesy that I gave my dog when she was in the end stages of cancer and the vet said that it was time to end her suffering.

Plus I am a serious coward with a strong desire to live. If it think it's time, it will be time.

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4644 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/16/2007 7:00 PM
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On the one hand, as far as I can tell, when I die, I die - just like every other animal that ever lived and died and ever will. If my suffering is too great for me to bear, and I am of sound mind, I hope others will respect my autonomy on that last, final, personal decision.
- jgc123

___________________________________________________________________

That's the amazing thing, after studying this question for 7 years, I'm fairly confident that something of who we are survives the death of our "physical" body.

excerpt from Mark Horton's NDE:
"This was very pleasant and comforting and went on for microseconds or billions of years, I have no idea since time just wasn't an operative construct and had no meaning or relevance to existence. I literally had the feeling that I was everywhere in the universe simultaneously."

http://www.mindspring.com/~scottr/nde/markh.html

This earth life is a school. The blink of an eye compared to eternity. We think it's a long time but it's really not compared to eternity. What's 70 years compared to a trillion years? A trillion times a trillion years? Once we cross back over into heaven our perception of this life will dramatically change. We're here just long enough to learn a few simple lessons then cross back over into the Spiritual Universe. Albert Einstein called this universe a "persistent illusion." Dr. David Bohm (PhD physicist) says that this universe is a holographic projection from someplace else, Maya, an illusion. Another words, this ain't the main show. The game is rigged and everyone wins in the end. God is so smart that He's created a Universe where we learn what it is we're supposed to learn whether we want to or not. Life's lessons are embedded in our everyday lives. We learn holistically what it is we're supposed to learn. Everyone becomes instantly enlightened (connected) upon entering the light. Information is there for the asking. All you have to do is think of a thing and you understand and know about it.

On the "other side" (heaven or the spiritual universe) the feelings of oneness and connectedness (due to it's holographic nature) are overwhelming, and thusly it may be very difficult, if not impossible to "become" a unique, separate, individual - that sense of "self" that we take for granted in this physical universe. I believe we're here in this physical universe for our souls to learn what it means and how it feels to be separate, unique, individual. With a separate sense of self. "I am not you." All the stuff that separates us in this life doesn't exist in the next life. For one thing communication takes place through telepathy, and there are no misunderstandings on the other side. Politics, religion, race, language, fat or thin, tall or short, wealth, education, looks, etc. all exist to "teach" our souls what it feels like to be separate and unique. The other side is the realm of the imaginal. Consciousness creates reality and thoughts are things. You create your own reality in heaven. The way you think will determine the reality you exist in.

Now, as far as separation goes, this life is all about separation. It's the theme to the lyrics to most songs, the theme to most movies, books, plays, and life in general. From the moment we are born when we separate from our mothers and that umbilical cord is cut we experience separation over and over and over again. It's not just separation from people but also from things. Pick a grape off a vine and you experience separation. Pick a tomato and experience separation. Cut up your food and you experience separation. Look at rice or noodles on your plate and your soul is learning what it means to be separate.

Why? Because of the holographic nature of the other side, and the overwhelming nature of those feelings of connectedness and oneness, it's imperative that our soul have firmly implanted on our consciousness what it means and how it feels to be separate. Life's lessons are embedded in our everyday lives and we learn holistically what it is we're supposed to learn.

The more emotional the experience the more powerful and long lasting the memory it creates. The ultimate separation experience is when someone you love dies. Nothing else even comes close. If the whole purpose of life is to experience separation - and thusly to teach the soul what it means and how it feels to be a separate, unique individual - then we need to experience enough separation in life to overcome the overwhelming and powerful feelings of connectedness and oneness in Heaven. We are here to develop that sense of "self", that thing that makes us special, ourselves. I think it has everything to do with "why we are here" and that almost everything in life is aimed in that direction. Separation.

In fact, I believe one of the reasons we aren't allowed to know absolutely for certain that there's a life after death is because if we knew absolutely 100% for certain that one day we were going to be reunited with the loved ones who have died before us, we may not mourn quite as much and thus diminish those powerful feelings of separation that we experience when they are gone.

Life is a lesson in separation. It's that way for a reason. It all has to do with the holographic nature of the Universe and those infinite and overwhelming feelings of separation that everyone experiences from the moment we are born and leave our mother's womb.

The Holographic Universe
http://www.earthportals.com/hologram.html#zine

Art


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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4654 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 11:37 AM
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As a vegan, who eats 85% of of his food raw

tootru:
I'm just curious, Decath, how you came to this decision. Not a lot of conservatives I know are very interested in a plant based diet. What convinced you? Books? Your doctor? Friends? Family?

My disclaimer - long time vegan (the ethical sort, not the strict vegetarian for health sort).

I'm always interested in people's stories around how they decided to make a switch. Please don't think I'm baiting you ... I am genuinely curious. I also live with an omnivore who has health problems, and I'd sure like to keep him around for long past retirement (early or otherwise) and wouldn't mind hearing how your DW is handling this (or how you are handling this in the face of potential reluctance from your DW)

Regards,
t.


Thanks for asking. I enjoy talking about health and exercise to people as much as discussing FIRE plans). Warning: Long reply.

I consider the ability to live a quality and quantity life an integral part of my FIRE plan. If I successfully FIRE at age 53, then I want to be able to do many of the things that I have been unable to do as a working stiff with a wife and 3 kids.

Growing up, my dad (a staunch independent, strong-willed libertarian) was interested in healthy living. However, giving the knowledge he had at the time, it was limited. My family did a good job of eating fiber rich foods but we ate entirely too much sugar, white flour and processed foods. Thanks to him, I at least had an open mind.

I was an all-around athlete in JH, HS and college. From 23 – 25, I aggressively pursued a birth on the US track & field team as a decathlete. However, I was plagued with injuries and never was able to compete in any major competition. I had all this amazing speed, strength and athletic ability but yet was never able to prove it to anyone except in the few local meets (when I was uninjured) where I competed in individual events.

I stopped training at the age of 26, just after I broke my heel pole-vaulting. It took about a year to heal. Then at the age of 27, my knee started giving me problems (from a HS football injury). I had it scoped and was sidelined for another year. By then, any Olympic dreams were dashed.

I was frustrated by the amount of time it took my body to heal and I was getting sick all the time. Colds and flues 3-6 times a year.

By the time I was 30; I was getting arthritis in various parts of my right arm (which I used to throw the shot, discus and javelin) and in both heels and generally just felt like my body was falling apart. I was eating an OK diet but I still ate too much sugar, drank 3 or 4 cups of coffee per day and overdosed on dairy products (because the propaganda says milk does a body good <g>). I was also experiencing severe “air born” allergies that progressively got worse with each passing year. Coaching my son during baseball season was nothing short of misery with the freshly cut grass and dirt always blowing in my face. I suffered 3 months during the spring and 3 months during the fall, despite taking allergen shots.

I still wanted to compete in sports (flag football, basketball, tennis, golf, softball, volleyball etc...) so being sidelined and playing with these pains were killing me.

During one of my weekly trips to our public library with the kids, I saw a book called “Fit for Life” by Harvey and Maryland Diamond displayed in a featured section. I checked it out and devoured it. Basically, they promoted a plant based diet, with most of it being raw.

I decided to take it slow at first. I replaced my normal breakfast of cereal and milk with raw fruit. The results were dramatic. My allergy problems were cut in half in a few weeks. Encouraged by that, I gave up dairy completely and then I quit eating processed sugar and caffeine (the hardest of all). I experienced severe headaches. Several times, I cowered and drank some coffee to relieve the tension headaches. But that only prolonged the detoxification. In the end, I figured cold turkey was the best way and I painfully endured it.

After a month or so, I noticed many of the arthritic pains subsiding. I continued to read books, magazines and articles (this was during the summer of 1991) about healthy living and decided to try veganism as well as start heavily supplementing with plant based dense nutrients like: barley grass juice, carrot juice, beet juice, wheatgrass juice and whole food organic vitamins.

Initially I did not feel much different other than my body fat declined from 10% to 6%. I experienced detox symptoms and was pretty discouraged by them. I would feel good for one day and then lousy again for a week. I remember missing a lot of days from work. It started worrying me. But eventually, the good days outnumbered the bad ones and by the end of the summer I felt better than I remembered. I started testing my bad knee by going on long distance runs. Being 6'5” and well over 200 lbs, I knew I was risking it. But the knee problem was gone. The cartilage had grown back. I was very much encouraged. I gradually worked back into a sports competition program, playing full court basketball year around, trained in taekwondo, softball, golf, tennis etc...

From the ages of 31 to 34, I ran a youth track & field club, mainly for my 2 kids, and would train with the HS kids. Except the occasional sub 11 second 100 meter speedster, there was not a HS kid that could out run me in the 100, 200 or 400. I put my knee, heels and body through the same training regimen of those HS kids and never had any of the previous injuries and problems before my diet change.

I was hooked and for the most part and have adhered to the following diet for the past 15 years. Basically I avoid the following foods with only an occasional lapse: sugar, white flour, white salt, caffeine, meat, dairy and alcohol. I grow organic veggies year around in my TX garden and buy organic veggies and fruits where I can find them (food co-ops and Whole Food's Stores). I still supplement with fresh veggie juices with my Green Life Juicer. Two glasses of carrot/beet juice per day, and 2-3 glasses of barley grass juice (from cold processed powder). I eat 85% of my food raw. The rest is cooked (beans, rice, steamed veggies, whole-grain breads etc...)

I just recently started competing in Master's track & field and hope to compete in the decathlon and other track & field events at the national and world levels. Last year, I had to re-examine myself as I started letting some old dietary habits creep in such as sugar and caffeine. As a result, I tore a groin muscle during a difficult week of training back in March of 2006. I was sidelined during all of 2006. In frustration, I went back to my pure diet at the end of 2006 and will have my 1st 2007 competition this May.

The social aspects of my diet have been frustrating. Initially, I experienced a good deal of opposition from friends and family. I tried to keep it to myself but many family members pried into my business and insisted on knowing why I did not eat their “chocolate pies” etc… Many took it personally, despite being rational and diplomatic about it.

Funny thing is that now that we are all older in our 40's, 50's & 60's, they are not nearly as critical. During family get-togethers, I'm out playing touch football with teenagers and outrunning them. They are sitting on their butts watching TV because they are overweight, out-of-shape and/or hurting from arthritis.

As far as it being a conservative/liberal issue, I can't say one way or the other. It seems to me that personal health should not be politicized. But I know people do it. I've had conservatives automatically accuse me of being a Buddhist like tree-hugger when they see me eat nothing but fruits and veggies. I just be nice about it and gently explain to them my reasoning. Some persist and try to convert me back to the “dark side”. There is something comical about an overweight person with a long list of health problems trying to preach to me the virtues of eating 'ice cream or steak” when I look and feel the way I do and they look and feel the way they do. <g> Oh well. The only way to convert people is to “kill them with kindness”. <g>

decath


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Author: TeraGram Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4655 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 11:40 AM
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From 23 – 25, I aggressively pursued a birth on the US track & field team as a decathlete.

Silly man. Having babies is supposed to be done at home or in hospitals, not on sports tracks!

- T.

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Author: sofaking6 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4656 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 11:46 AM
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Hey decath, my father is 67 and competes in Master's events (swimming now, formery triathlons)...he was veggie almost my whole life, and vegan for almost 10 years (now he has incorporated some fish back into his diet)...he had a major heart episode two months ago, had an ICD (pacemaker/defibrillator) put in, and is already back to 90% of his prior level of exercise/training.

6



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Author: tootru Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4657 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 11:47 AM
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That's an awesome story! Thank's so much for sharing it.

I have a great urge to start running again, and you've just inspired me to give up my "junk food vegan" ways ...

I really appreciate you taking the time to post your story.

t.

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Author: vickifool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4659 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 12:03 PM
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I decided to take it slow at first. I replaced my normal breakfast of cereal and milk with raw fruit. The results were dramatic. My allergy problems were cut in half in a few weeks. Encouraged by that, I gave up dairy completely and then I quit eating processed sugar and caffeine (the hardest of all). I experienced severe headaches. Several times, I cowered and drank some coffee to relieve the tension headaches. But that only prolonged the detoxification. In the end, I figured cold turkey was the best way and I painfully endured it.

After a month or so, I noticed many of the arthritic pains subsiding.


Cutting out caffeine also worked to make the knees of friend of mine feel better. Since I know her from the dance community, this was a very good thing.

It's not total relief, but it helps her a lot.

Vickifool -- now stocks a few caffeine-free teas for her.

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4660 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 12:04 PM
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Hey decath, my father is 67 and competes in Master's events (swimming now, formery triathlons)...he was veggie almost my whole life, and vegan for almost 10 years (now he has incorporated some fish back into his diet)...he had a major heart episode two months ago, had an ICD (pacemaker/defibrillator) put in, and is already back to 90% of his prior level of exercise/training.

6


That is great! I see a lot of inspiring 50, 60, 70 and even 80+ people competing in Master's competitions from sports as benign as badmitton to aggressive physical sports like basketball. They inspire me as a 45 yo.

They crack me up too! They are just as competitive as any 20 something world class athlete.

I have found that most eat pretty well. They are not all vegans or vegetarians but I think most of them realize the importance of fiber rich foods and that the worse food you can eat is processed sugar.

My dad turns 64 this year and he competes on a nationally ranked volleyball team in the 60-64 age division. His team was 5th in the nation last year. He's a vegitarian (still eats dairy).

decath

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4661 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 12:05 PM
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That's an awesome story! Thank's so much for sharing it.

I have a great urge to start running again, and you've just inspired me to give up my "junk food vegan" ways ...

I really appreciate you taking the time to post your story.

t.


Good luck and God speed on your training!

decath

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4662 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 12:09 PM
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Cutting out caffeine also worked to make the knees of friend of mine feel better. Since I know her from the dance community, this was a very good thing.

It's not total relief, but it helps her a lot.

Vickifool -- now stocks a few caffeine-free teas for her.


I've read countless testimonies about caffeine being linked to arthritic pain.

It really bites too. I love a good strong cup of coffee. Decaf does not do anything. Neither does the teas or a wheat based product called Postum.

Instead, I drink a glass of carrot juice in the morning or have a piece of juicy fruit. That helps me ignore the coffee smell that permiates the office cubicles around me while at work.

decath

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Author: sofaking6 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4663 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 12:27 PM
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I've read countless testimonies about caffeine being linked to arthritic pain.

Just arthritic pain or other joint pain?

Man my knees are aching this morning.


I just signed up with a coffee-of-the-week club, too.

6


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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4664 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 12:51 PM
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I've read countless testimonies about caffeine being linked to arthritic pain.

Just arthritic pain or other joint pain?

Man my knees are aching this morning.


I just signed up with a coffee-of-the-week club, too.

6


Probably both but I don't remember specifically.

I'm certainly no expert on the subject. What I always tell poeple is to experiment and try going without a food for a month or 2 and see what the results are. Research and digging on the internet/books/magazines will help as well.

You may be able to get away with a moderate amount of coffee.

Different poeple sometimes have different results.

3 years ago, I added 2 cups of coffee back into my diet. Then just last year, I started feeling the same sharp pains back into my heals. I had grown accustomed to my 2 cups and wanted to keep it that way. The pains got worse, to the point it affected my training. So I cut out the coffee and walla! No more heal pains after abstaining for just 2 weeks. No other changes in diet or training had occurred and the pains have not returned. So the caffeine must have been the contributing factor.

decath

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Author: jgc123 Big gold star, 5000 posts Top Recommended Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4665 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 1:22 PM
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If you want to give up coffee, use the Finnish study from around 2000 which suggests a link between rheumatoid arthritis and caffeine.

If you want to drink coffee, use the NIH study from a couple of years ago which says there is no link.

Or test out the theory anecdotally on yourself like decath did.

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Author: sofaking6 Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4666 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 1:45 PM
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If you want to give up coffee, use the Finnish study from around 2000 which suggests a link between rheumatoid arthritis and caffeine.

If you want to drink coffee, use the NIH study from a couple of years ago which says there is no link.

Or test out the theory anecdotally on yourself like decath did.


I'd rather give up dairy, for sure.

Except for that sauce they put on fish tacos.

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4670 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 2:57 PM
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If you want to give up coffee, use the Finnish study from around 2000 which suggests a link between rheumatoid arthritis and caffeine.

If you want to drink coffee, use the NIH study from a couple of years ago which says there is no link.

Or test out the theory anecdotally on yourself like decath did.


Good advice.

One thing I've learned over the years is to not treat nutrition as an exact science. At least not yet anyways with our current technology.

I remember reading about a study on Eskimoes. It would seem that after thousands of years of eating a meat based diet (a lot of it high in fat), they've adapted to it and come down with health problems when they deviate.

So in that respect, genetics can be a determining factor in some cases. However, I think in most cases and for most people, a plant based diet is the best way to go.

I don't think everyone has to be as radical about it as I am. I still hope for a national championship or a world championship decathlon medal someday. It may be in the "geezer Olympics", but at 45+ it will be all I can do.

I'm willing to eat like I do to keep my body healthy in order to attempt it.

decath

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Author: ariechert Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4671 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 3:06 PM
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So in that respect, genetics can be a determining factor in some cases. However, I think in most cases and for most people, a plant based diet is the best way to go. - decath
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So in that respect, genetics can be a determining factor in some cases. However, I think in most cases and for most people, a meat based diet is the best way to go. - Art


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Author: PolymerMom Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4676 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/17/2007 10:50 PM
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What I always tell poeple is to experiment and try going without a food for a month or 2 and see what the results are.

That's also what is done when trying to track down food allergies.

By the way, the heel pain sounds like plantar fascitis. Did you maybe change shoes? Stiff soled shoes tend to aggravate the condition, I'm told.

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Author: decath Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4677 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/18/2007 9:16 AM
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PolymerMom:
That's also what is done when trying to track down food allergies.

By the way, the heel pain sounds like plantar fascitis. Did you maybe change shoes? Stiff soled shoes tend to aggravate the condition, I'm told.


I did not change shoes.

decath

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Author: alaskack Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 4680 of 62040
Subject: Re: Retirment issues? Date: 4/18/2007 3:53 PM
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PolymerMom:
By the way, the heel pain sounds like plantar fascitis. Did you maybe change shoes? Stiff soled shoes tend to aggravate the condition, I'm told.

decath:
I did not change shoes.


I used to have heel pain all the time. About 15 years ago I switched to Asics, which have gel soles. The heel pain felt better the first time I walked in them and went completely away after 3 weeks. Haven't had any pain since then, even when I wear dress shoes for work. Also, get shoes that proper for your foot type. Roadrunnersports.com has a guide to determine the best fit for your foot type.

Calvin

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