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Author: hy7ujhy7 One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 65358  
Subject: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 3:46 PM
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If the install prompted me for a root password, I don't remember it. I need to install some unix stuff in /usr/local. My user account has admin privileges, but that doesn't seem to be enough. How much trouble am I in?
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Author: mzee20 Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3220 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 5:06 PM
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It should just be the password you chose for the primary user when you first installed OS X. It is the same one you use for filesharing and logon. Your main account comes with privileges, but you have to invoke them explicitly by using the login password to excercise them. Apple is trying to protect us from ourselves :-), although in the old days when I was sysadmin for multiuser systems, I always had three different accounts: ordinary user, superuser, and God. Apple sets it up this way for us, as it's considered good practise.

MZ

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Author: bingoboy Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3224 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 6:50 PM
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If the install prompted me for a root password, I don't remember it. I need to install some unix stuff in /usr/local. My user account has admin privileges, but that doesn't seem to be enough. How much trouble am I in?

No trouble at all. From the mothership:

Resetting the original Admin user password
Use these steps to reset a password when there is only one Admin user on the computer, or if the original Admin user (of several) needs a password reset. "Original" Admin user refers to the one that was created immediately after installing Mac OS X. So long as the original Admin password is known, the original Admin user may reset the passwords of other Admin users using the steps described above.

1. Start up from the Mac OS X 10.0 Install CD.
2. Select Reset Password from the Installer menu.
3. Select your Mac OS X hard disk volume.
4. Set the selected user to the name of your original Admin.
5. Enter a new password.
6. Click Save.

Important: If you log in as a secondary Admin user and try to change the password of the original Admin user, a sheet appears with this message:

"The Keychain password for this user cannot be changed to the new account password. The old Keychain password remains in effect."

This message is not correct. If you log out and attempt to log back in as the original Admin user, you will find that the password has actually been changed. At this time, this is not a preferred method for resetting the original Admin password. You should use the steps described above when started up from CD.

http://til.info.apple.com/techinfo.nsf/artnum/n106156

bingo

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Author: hy7ujhy7 One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3226 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 7:09 PM
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That doesn't seem to be it. When I change something for a preferences panel, and it prompts me for the password, that works fine. What doesn't work is when I want to, for example, "cp x /usr/local" in Terminal. That directory is owned by root, but when I try to "su", that password doesn't work.

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Author: bingoboy Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3229 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 7:39 PM
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That doesn't seem to be it. When I change something for a preferences panel, and it prompts me for the password, that works fine. What doesn't work is when I want to, for example, "cp x /usr/local" in Terminal. That directory is owned by root, but when I try to "su", that password doesn't work.

Okay. Now I know what you want to do. You will need to enable root access, which is not at all the same as the administrator user you normally use. Btw, do not just create a new user call "root". Anyway, this link shows you the way.

Enabling the root password (three ways)
http://www.macosxhints.com/profiles.php?sid=20010324095804436&what=emailstory

bingo

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Author: mzee20 Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3230 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 7:39 PM
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You might want to check out http://www.macfixit.com/ultimate/Forum26/HTML/001611.html and other related threads. Search on "root" in the subject line. It was my impression that while we can easily get admin privs that we don't get true root privs (root=God). But this is just a vague idea in the back of my mind which is likely to have been corrupted by damage caused by age and past bad habits. In any case, the place where I read it has a fix, but I can't find it now.

Sorry I can't help. Someone else will undoubtedly be along soon who can, though.

MZ

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Author: bingoboy Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3231 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 7:52 PM
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Darn it! That link didn't work. Go to http://www.macosxhints.com/
Do a search for Enable Root.

bingo

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Author: hy7ujhy7 One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3232 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/6/2001 8:02 PM
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Thanks! "sudo" and "sudo su" are just what I was looking for.

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Author: reetnem Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3281 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/9/2001 4:59 PM
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Having more then one account for a single person is so silly. Still on the 24th when I installed OS X on my Ti I had 4 accounts set up!

Trebor - the original administrator
Bob - for personal files and normal usage
root - for when you absolutly have to get it done
guest - a safe user to show off OS X

What is neat is that you can log in as one user and still change some preferences as the original administrator! To change the boot disk (to boot in OS 9), you must unlock the startup preference as an administrator.

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Author: mzee20 Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 3282 of 65358
Subject: Re: root password in OSX Date: 4/9/2001 5:52 PM
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re:Having more then one account for a single person is so silly.

It seems so at first, but you have already found the utility of having a login for each of your "hats". Remember to deauthorize privs when you are finished so you don't accidently allow yourself or someone else to do something you will later regret.

It's nice to be an ordinary user and bounce around your little playpen, sure that you're not doing anything stupid, or at least nothing that will bring down your system. You can even have special logins to represent users on other systems (for testing software, change prefs and colors to test interfaces, etc).

MZ

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