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I will be making more than the limit allowing me to deduct the contribution to a traditional IRA this year. I would like to know if, under these circumstances, a Roth IRA is the best way to go. Since I would have no deduction for a traditional IRA, doesn't a Roth make the most sense? At least I would get a tax benefit after I retire. Any other possibilities? I apologize if this has been asked a thousand times. Thanks.

WSGrunt
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If your adjusted gross income is less than $150000 a year for married, filing jointly, you are allowed a Roth IRA.
If your income is too great for a traditional IRA to be tax deductible, the Roth makes all kinds of sense because you do not pay tax on the capital gains.
If you are in an even higher income range, then the non-deductible traditional IRA is all you have available. In that case it still lets you defer tax on the earnings and is better than nothing.
Best wishes, Chris
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Greetings, WSGrunt, and welcome. You asked:

I will be making more than the limit allowing me to deduct the contribution to a traditional IRA this year. I would like to know if, under these circumstances, a Roth IRA is the best way to go. Since I would have no deduction for a traditional IRA, doesn't a Roth make the most sense? At least I would get a tax benefit after I retire. Any other possibilities? I apologize if this has been asked a thousand times.

Award yourself a gold star for Foolish thinking. You are correct that when all you can make is a nondeductible contribution to an IRA, then that contribution should be to a Roth IRA, assuming you meet the AGI limits for your filing status to make such a contribution. Ultimately, you may take everything from a Roth IRA totally free of income taxes. In the traditional, the earnings would be taxed.

Regards..Pixy
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