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No. of Recommendations: 9
How sad I was to see the criticisms of Ethipoian food, given that the nature of the cooking board is the exaltation of all the bounty the earth provides us. How unfortunate to hear "Oh, it's mush- it's tasteless"- type comments. I have had Ethiopian food on three continents now (Atlanta, London and Tokyo) and guess what- just as is the case with Mexican, Japanese, Chinese, French and any other cuisine it's the restaurant, and at least some knowledge on the part of the customer, that determines the quality of the food and experience. It's safe to say that I like good Ethiopian as much as any dish. Good food is good food, period.

I've found Ethiopian food to be exciting, delicious and interesting. And as for Ethiopian wine- while quite different from what I'm use to, it certainly was pleasant and produced quite a "giggle factor".

Sorry to sound so cheesed off, but living here in Tokyo, I get my share of "Oh, an American. You must miss hambugers, french fries and the like" all too often. It is a terrible shame to hear such comments, as they reflect a sort of culinary prejudice I find most disappointing; there are so very opportunities to savor the magic of international cuisine if one only takes the time to learn, and to search out the best.

Wilkun
Whose wife made a most excellent Japanese-style curry this evening- Yum!
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I get my share of "Oh, an American. You must miss hambugers, french fries and the like"

I went to Italy back in 1995 for a cousin's wedding. Planned to spend the entire trip in trattorias and bars. Ended up spending a significant amount of time in a Neopolitan burger bar called "Gnam" because the Italian side of my family thought it was much trendier and more wonderful than plain old Italian food. SO much seems to be a matter of perspective. As one of the bashers of Ethiopian food, it never occurred to me to make one of my underlying assumptions clear - the ethnic food you get here is going to bear little or no resemblance to the ethnic food you get in the particular ethnic region. Italian food here is lasagne and baked ziti. Italian food in Italy is eggplant, basted with olive oil, grilled and stuffed with caponata...
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No. of Recommendations: 2
<the nature of the cooking board is the exaltation of all the bounty the earth provides us.>

It could not have been said better. Perhaps there would be more peace and cultural tolerance if we were all exposed to the cuisines of others.

Jean

p.s. Your wife's Japanese curry: recipe, please!
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No. of Recommendations: 2
How sad I was to see the criticisms of Ethipoian food, given that the nature of the cooking board is the exaltation of all the
bounty the earth provides us. How unfortunate to hear "Oh, it's mush- it's tasteless"- type comments. ... I've found Ethiopian food to be exciting, delicious and interesting.


I second that emotion. The thread mystified me, as my several experiences eating in Ethiopian restaurants in Atlanta, Ann Arbor and Minneapolis (two different restaurants in Mpls) were all delightful to the palate and interesting to the eyes and ears. I can't wait until I can eat at one again on another trip.
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What I would like someone to explain to me is - If you don't care for the recipe why do you feel it is necessary to slam it? Why not just post a alternative?? In my opinion every poster of recipes on this board is pleased with thier work and wish to share it and not ask you to be a Critic.
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No. of Recommendations: 1
How sad I was to see the criticisms of Ethipoian food, given that the nature of the cooking board is the exaltation of all the
bounty the earth provides us. How unfortunate to hear "Oh, it's mush- it's tasteless"- type comments. ... I've found Ethiopian food to be exciting, delicious and interesting.


Although I don't happen to like Ethiopian cooking, I do agree that it is thoughtless to make such comments. I was always brought up that it is VERY rude to denigrate someone else's tastes and preference. The comments have nothing to do with prejudice, the comments have to do with a lack of manners.
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No. of Recommendations: 5
<If you don't care for the recipe why do you feel it is necessary to slam it?>

Okay, let's all be nice.

But no way should we take back the bad things we all said about fat-free cream cheese.
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But no way should we take back the bad things we all said about fat-free cream cheese.

I like fat-free cream cheese. It's good on toast or sourdough English muffins. (I don't eat bagels).

I like fat-free mayo. It's good on sandwiches.

I like fat-free sour cream. You just have to learn how to work with it. Think of it as a challenge of your culinary skills.

I like fat-free cottage cheese. If I want some fat in my cottage cheese, I'll add some slices of avocado...

I like fat-free ricotta. It's great stuff!

I like fat-free cheese slices on my sandwiches.

I don't like fat-free milk. I drink 1% fat milk.

Have I forgotten anything???


8^)
OleDoc
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No. of Recommendations: 18
Although I don't happen to like Ethiopian cooking, I do agree that it is thoughtless to make such comments. I was always brought up that it is VERY rude to denigrate someone else's tastes and preference. The comments have nothing to do with prejudice, the comments have to do with a lack of manners.

Look, I have no desire to start a tussle, but I'm confused here. Since when is it rude to have an opinion? I thought cooking (and eating)was still an area where it is okay to have an opinion. I had a bad experience with Ethiopian food, just like other people have had bad experiences with jello salads, Circus Peanuts, peeps and Spam. What is wrong with saying I didn't like the taste or the texture? Food writers do, all the time. The people that rate recipes on Epicurious.com have no trouble saying "hey, it sucked!" I grant you, it would be rude if I came to your house and announced "Ewwww, I hate this" to something you went to the trouble to cook for me. It would also be rude to suggest that Ethiopia should be turned into an all-glass, self-lighting parking lot because I hate the food. Or that my experience in an Ethiopian restaurant leads me to hate all Ethiopians. But I haven't said, nor do I feel, any of that. I had a bad experience with Ethiopian food, and I will maintain my opinion of Ethiopian food until such a time as I have a good experience with it. And I don't believe an opinion based on personal experience of someone's cuisine counts as "prejudice", anymore than it is prejudiced to say "I don't like medium-rare steak."

Just my 2 cents.

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Since when is it rude to have an opinion? I thought cooking (and eating)was still an area where it is okay to have an opinion.

-tmdyer in 10924

Hi again all,

OK, I owe a bit of an apology. forgive me for having a bit of a bad hair day when I wrote the note opening this thread. Only after submitting it did I give thought to the inflammatory nature of the word "prejudice" these days. I certainly had no intention of claiming any distaste on the part of others for a nation, racial group or way of life. All I wanted to say was "Gee, surely one bad experience can't sour y'all on a whole style of cookery."

Just as is the case with Chinese, Italian, or any other cuisine, there are good restaurants and bad, regardless of how exotic the food. Heaven knows, the first time I took my parents to get Indian, they insisted on ordering for themselves, and unfortunately, went away very dissatisfied with the experience. We've been back since, and had a grand time, once they had more of an idea of how the dishes are meant to fit together. I'm just suggesting that perhaps a visit to a different restaurant, or a trip with someone knowledgable about both the food of the region as well as your own likes and dislikes might well lead to a much more exciting experience.

Just a thought.

Wilkun
Who enjoyed sweet and sour stir fried whitefish, a corn croquette, a mini ham and veggie ommelette and rice topped with salmon today in the box lunch prepared by his Sweetie- Yum City!
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I like fat-free cream cheese. It's good on toast or sourdough English muffins. (I don't eat bagels).

I like fat-free mayo. It's good on sandwiches.

I like fat-free sour cream. You just have to learn how to work with it. Think of it as a challenge of your culinary skills.

I like fat-free cottage cheese. If I want some fat in my cottage cheese, I'll add some slices of avocado...

I like fat-free ricotta. It's great stuff!

I like fat-free cheese slices on my sandwiches.

I don't like fat-free milk. I drink 1% fat milk.

Have I forgotten anything???


OleDoc:

How about fat-free beer?

C.J.V.

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Hi, Ole Doc:

"I don't like fat-free milk. I drink 1% fat milk."

I wonder. I betcha that you, like me, are old enough to remember the taste of real whole milk, just off the farm, with real cream on top. And I remember how, in the wintertime, as it froze on the stoop, the cap on a glass bottle would be pushed upwards, and the cats would try to lick the cream before we could "rescue" it. (I hate "memories" as opposed to "today's experience".)

Ray

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I had a bad experience with Ethiopian food, and I will maintain my opinion of Ethiopian food until such a time as I have a good experience with it.

If you're ever in Minneapolis, I'll help you with this. There are several *fantastic* Ethiopian restaraunts in town, and I've had great meals at all of the ones I've been to.


Yum!
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Have I forgotten anything???


8^)
OleDoc


Fat-free lamb with red wine?

John :o)
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I don't like fat-free milk. I drink 1% fat milk.

Fat-free milk is somewhat akin to not-so good wine. MUST be served ICE cold to be palatable.

John
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I wonder. I betcha that you, like me, are old enough to remember the taste of real whole milk, just off the farm, with real cream on top. And I remember how, in the wintertime, as it froze on the stoop, the cap on a glass bottle would be pushed upwards, and the cats would try to lick the cream before we could "rescue" it. (I hate "memories" as opposed to "today's experience".)

<slobber>
I remember this from junior high in the '80s. We had a milkman (!) who delivered raw milk every week. Now I can only get it pasteurized (which I don't mind so much) at the store. But it still has the cream on top, *and* it's Guernsey milk, so it's super tasty. No wonder my cholsterol is sky-high. Ah well. Eat healthy, die anyway.
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Ray,
I wonder. I betcha that you, like me, are old enough to remember the taste of real whole milk, just off the farm, with real cream on top

Yep! And when we went to dinner at Grandma's house, the milk was fresh from the cow to the table in a stainless steel bucket.

I actually hated 2% milk for a long time but I finally got used to it. Switched to 1% a few years ago and got used to it.

I get my "milk fat" quota by eating a little bit of double cream champignon brie now and then <grin>


OleDoc
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John:
Fat-free lamb with red wine?

Dang! I knew I was forgetting something!!!


OleDoc
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forgive me for having a bit of a bad hair day when I wrote the note opening this thread

Not a problem. You made a very good point about how Americans are viewed (and view themselves) abroad. I suspect a great deal of it may stem from insular and boorish behavior. No, my undies got bunched by the rudeness post.

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Culinary Prejudice? I'll bet not as much as some other cultures. We, at least, are open-minded enough to beat ourselves up about it (as we are about lots of things). But how easy it is to be prejudiced! A German friend told me of one of their popular dishes -- pig stomach stuffed with potatoes and (sausage?) Skuse me, I already ate. Insects? Vermin? Hey! If being a little picky is prejudiced, I imagine folks all over the world would qualify.

Mike <eating fritos w. hot sauce>
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