Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (23) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 55993  
Subject: Safety while cooking Date: 10/28/2012 3:29 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 13
A few months ago I was boiling eggs, walked out of the kitchen to do something or other in another room and became involved in whatever it was I was doing. About 15 minutes later, I heard some cracking noises and then remembered the eggs. The water had boiled away and one of the eggs had cracked in a few places -- but that was all.

I started to then think about how much more serious an event like that could be, depending on what I had on the stove.

So, ever since then, regardless of what I'm cooking, if I leave the kitchen, I set the good ole Presto timer. (It has a loud ring.) Even if I only set it for 5 minutes, it will at least remind me (when I get involved in something else in another room) that I need to go check on whatever's cooking (and reset the timer for another 5, 10 or 20 minutes (or longer), as the case may be).

It's now a habit and one that I think is a good one.

Christina
Print the post Back To Top
Author: QuickCarrera Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Global Fool Motley Fool One Everlasting Fool SN Olympia3 Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54678 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/28/2012 4:15 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Christina,

Thanks for sharing—perhaps it will save others a nasty experience.

Being in the insurance business, I can't tell you how many greese/oil fires I've seen caused by a very similar scenario as you described. Someone comes to the door, the phone rings, etc. Setting the timer is a smart thing to do.

BTW, stay safe and good luck to you and your friends and neighbors there on the east coast over the next few days!!

Bill

Print the post Back To Top
Author: pauleckler Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54679 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/28/2012 4:22 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
And remember the best you can do with a range fire is smother it (as with a cookie sheet or lid) or carry it outside if it is small.

Never, ever put water on a grease fire. It will usually cause a flareup and a much bigger fire.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54680 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/28/2012 7:21 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Someone comes to the door, the phone rings, etc. Setting the timer is a smart thing to do.

In my case, it could be just wandering into another room for some reason or other and then getting "involved" and totally forgetting that I have something on the stove!

Once I got into the habit, setting the timer became automatic and I do believe that it will be even more important as I continue "to age".

BTW, stay safe and good luck to you and your friends and neighbors there on the east coast over the next few days!

Thanks, Bill, we may need it!

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54681 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/28/2012 7:24 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
And remember the best you can do with a range fire is ....or carry it outside if it is small.

Not good advice for me as I live on the 10th floor!!

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: Goofyhoofy Big funky green star, 20000 posts Top Favorite Fools Top Recommended Fools Feste Award Nominee! Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54682 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 9:27 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I have a microwave oven which beeps every 10 seconds after you nuke something, to remind you that your coffee is ready or you potato is hot or whatever. The beep is persistent, but not obnoxious ...

So when I need that sort of safety reminder, I just nuke the empty chamber for ONE SECOND, and then the microwave continues to pester me until I attend to it.

While you shouldn't turn on the microwave for a long period without something to absorb the energy in the chamber, one second is barely enough time to get the electrons flowing, so it's no big deal. And while it also has a "timer" mode, that rings once and stops. If I walk out of the room and it goes off, I never hear it. The little beep every ten seconds reminds me no matter how longs I've been gone.

(Sometimes after I boil eggs, for instance, I'll leave them to cool on the stovetop before putting them in the fridge. Then I'll go shower, but then forget them and leave them there all day. With the reminder, the next time I'm anywhere near the kitchen I get the beep and go "Oh yeah, the eggs...")

Print the post Back To Top
Author: RainyDayWoman Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54683 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 11:43 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
So when I need that sort of safety reminder, I just nuke the empty chamber for ONE SECOND, and then the microwave continues to pester me until I attend to it.

Good idea. Even better, nuke your kitchen sponge for a minute and kill the nasty bugs on it. Make the microwave do double duty.

RDW

Print the post Back To Top
Author: sheila727 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54684 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 12:28 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
Even better, nuke your kitchen sponge for a minute and kill the nasty bugs on it.

What nasty bugs? Sponges are cleaned after use. Soap/water are adequate. What more is truly needed? People don't get sick from kitchen sponges.


sheila

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54685 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 2:14 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
which beeps every 10 seconds after you nuke something....The beep is persistent, but not obnoxious ...

That might be good for certain things but I really don't want something to start beeping at me 10 seconds after I set it. I can set my timer to go off up to 59 minutes after I set it. Allows time for the eggs to boil or whatever.

I also don't really want something to keep on beeping, whether it's obnoxious or not.

However, YMMV.

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54686 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 2:19 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Sponges are cleaned after use. Soap/water are adequate.

What about folks who use the sponge to wipe the counter after cutting raw chicken, etc.?

I try to remember NOT to use the sponge and use paper towels but....

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: sheila727 Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54687 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 6:45 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
What about folks who use the sponge to wipe the counter after cutting raw chicken, etc.?

I do such cutting on a cutting board, then scrub it. Never occurred to me anyone does such messy cutting directly on the countertop. And if there's anything possibly contaminating to wipe up, I'd do it only with a paper towel and dispose of it immediately.


sheila

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54688 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/29/2012 7:33 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
And if there's anything possibly contaminating to wipe up, I'd do it only with a paper towel and dispose of it immediately.

That's what I try to remember to do too, however, I'm not sure that absolutely everyone does that.

Christina, more concerned right now about that crane dangling 90 floors up just a couple of blocks from my apartment than I am about a "germy" sponge

Print the post Back To Top
Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54689 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/30/2012 6:15 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
. . . more concerned right now about that crane dangling 90 floors up just a couple of blocks from my apartment than I am about a "germy" sponge



Christina, still got power? See; http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/raw-new-york-power-st... .
;-(

C.J.V. - ours was out for 8 or 7 weeks after Hurricane Katrina, us

Print the post Back To Top
Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54690 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/30/2012 6:22 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Also see; http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/nyc-faces-11-foot-sto... .
;-(

C.J.V. - wishing I sold my ConEd stock Friday, me

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54691 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/30/2012 2:21 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
Christina, still got power?

I never lost power, however, most of Manhattan below 34th Street (which I believe includes sheila) is without power.

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: voelkels Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54692 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/31/2012 5:50 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
“Christina, still got power?”

I never lost power, however, most of Manhattan below 34th Street (which I believe includes sheila) is without power.


Glad you made it through o.k., me. DW has been getting photos and short videos from my brother in MD. He presently owns the old family “beach house” in Lavallette, N.J.
;-(

C.J.V. - hope he got flood insurance on it, yes

Print the post Back To Top
Author: MetroChick Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54693 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/31/2012 2:45 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Sponges are cleaned after use. Soap/water are adequate. What more is truly needed? People don't get sick from kitchen sponges.

Sponges are not considered clean just from soap and water. Commercial/restaurant kitchens aren't even allowed to use sponges.

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/28/dining/squeaky-clean-not-e...

''A sponge that's been in use for no more than two or three days in a kitchen will harbor millions of bacteria,'' said Elizabeth Scott, co-director of the Simmons Center for Hygiene and Health in the Home at Simmons College in Boston. That's a problem, she said, ''if you pick up the pathogen or a pathogenic E. coli, salmonella or campylobacter on the sponge.''

A sponge should be nuked in the microwave or put through the dishwasher daily and replaced at least every 30 days.

Also, wiping down the sick just with soap and water isn't enough to kill bacteria - I spray mine down each night with a mixture of diluted bleach and let it dry overnight.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: TMFPMarti Big funky green star, 20000 posts Home Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54694 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/31/2012 3:37 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
Also, wiping down the sick just with soap and water isn't enough to kill bacteria - I spray mine down each night with a mixture of diluted bleach and let it dry overnight.

I figure this is a good way to keep your children from complaining about not feeling well.

(I rarely make fun of typos, but this one was too precious to resist.)

Phil
Rule Your Retirement Home Fool

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54695 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/31/2012 8:34 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
I spray mine down each night with a mixture of diluted bleach and let it dry overnight.

If you have a septic system (as opposed to a connection to a sewer, etc.), you might want to limit how much bleach you use.

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: chkNYC Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54696 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 10/31/2012 8:39 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
(I rarely make fun of typos...)

Did I ever tell you about the email I got (when I was still practicing law at a Wall Street firm) from a young attorney (on the other side in a matter I was working on), apologizing for a Type-O?

I didn't recall that any blood had been donated....LOL.

Christina

Print the post Back To Top
Author: MetroChick Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54697 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 11/1/2012 10:57 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0

I figure this is a good way to keep your children from complaining about not feeling well.


Meant sink.

But wiping down your children each day with diluted bleach before the re-enter the house from school, might cut down on what you catch from them ;)

Print the post Back To Top
Author: MetroChick Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54698 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 11/1/2012 11:01 AM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
If you have a septic system (as opposed to a connection to a sewer, etc.), you might want to limit how much bleach you use.

Don't have a septic system - but the "recipe" Alton Brown uses for sanitizing spray is 1 1/2 teaspoons bleach to a pint of water (replaced weekly). If one's afraid for their septic system from that, they could always used a sink stopper before spraying, as by morning it will evaporate to salt.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: rharmelink Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 54707 of 55993
Subject: Re: Safety while cooking Date: 11/3/2012 11:07 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
A friend once told me he was making caramel sauce by boiling a can of condensed milk. Then he realized he needed to pick something up quickly at the store. Forgot about the boiling can and didn't return for a few hours.

A seam on the can had split open, just slightly, but enough to cause a small stream of caramel sauce to spray out of the can, under high pressure. And, as it sprayed, the can spun. So he ended up with a nice sticky caramel sauce sprayed all around the kitchen.

On the commercial side, I talked with a friend who, along with a few investors, had bought out an Chinese restaurant in a mall, so they could open an Italian restaurant. He said they spent a week scraping layers of grease off the walls of the kitchen. Several inches deep in some places.

Anyone watching the new "Health Inspectors" show on the Food Network? Yuck.

Print the post Back To Top
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (23) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Advertisement