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Author: cmonkey Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 121703  
Subject: Seizures Date: 5/12/1999 4:16 PM
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Boy, I am just having the worst pet karma lately. Phoebe (my Schipperke) had a seizure last night; ordinarily I wouldn't be too concerned, but this is the third one this year. Now that's less than one a month, but it's more than she's ever had before (which is none).

As they go, it wasn't that severe; I could hear her little feet skittering around on the floor, and then she mostly stood and craned her neck. There was a bit of drooling, but it wasn't much. I patted her and talked to her and we waited it out. Then she went to sleep and horked down a big breakfast this morning (including most of Rita's; she's nothing if not a chow hound).

Has anyone ever had a pet who *occasionally* had seizures but was otherwise healthy? How do you determine when it's time to take them in for a checkup? Well obviously if they became common and/or intractable, but aside from that, should I take the 'well, right now they're infrequent, she's otherwise normal' attitude or should I panic? Is it just a personal comfort level at this point?

Can anybody fix my dog?

Wearily yours,
cmonkey
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Author: mys Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 703 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/12/1999 4:31 PM
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>>Boy, I am just having the worst pet karma lately. >>

Poor you! And poor Phoebe!

I don't have any really helpful, practical advice -- but I would suggest taking her in to the vet to check it out. If they are increasing in frequency it might be time to do something about it.

mys

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Author: ToddlerMom Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 704 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/12/1999 5:13 PM
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cmonkey,

My oldest kitty had seizures last year and were found to be due to a moderateley severe anemia. Which was corrected and she has become her old, if somewhat peevish, self again.

Please take Phoebe to the vet to be checked out. There are many things which can cause siezures in dogs, cats and humans. I hope it will be easily remedied.

GA

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Author: TMF2Aruba Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 705 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/12/1999 5:34 PM
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cmonkey,

PLEASE take Phoebe to the vet. There has to be something wrong, and only the vet will be able to determine what it is (hopefully!).

My heart is going out to you right now, as it brings back memories of my cat, Sandi. She was diabetic, and it was nearly impossible to keep her regulated. She would have seizures too, and it was heartbreaking to see it happening. The poor thing didn't know what was hitting her, and it was as hard on us when it happened.

If I'm not mistaken, seizures are a symptom of some disorder, not the disorder itself. You need to have the vet determine the cause of the symptoms so poor Phoebe [and you] don't have to suffer.

Please keep us informed as to how it's going.

Tony
...but I still am...

Off2Aruba

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Author: basilparmesan Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 706 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 8:07 AM
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My 16.5 yr. old Pekingese started having seizures more than a year ago. They came in clusters and seemingly were triggered by exertion, stress or sometimes nothing.

She was diagnosed with heart problems and has been medicated with digitalis and a mild barbituate. After several adjustments to the dosages, she has returned to reasonably health (age considered). Don't give up.



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Author: TMFPsyche Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 708 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 9:40 AM
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Do you have a videocamera? If so, videotape a seizure if another comes about (which frankly, I hope it doesn't). My brother's cat went into seizures every now and again and they took him to 4 different vets. Taboo went through nuerous x-rays, brain scans, exams, medications, probes, and ultrasounds. None of the vets knew what was going on. When they wanted to do surgery, I convinced my brother to first go to my vet (my brother was a bit of a snob and didn't feel that a "country vet" <actually just small town> could figure out a problem so complex as a seizure)> He finally agreed, and my vet said "Videotape the seizure next time it happens and bring the tape and the cat in." My brother did this - the vet took one look at the tape and knew exactly what it was. Now how this is, I don't know... must be some kind of vet magic knowledge thing. But anyway, surgery was avoided, medication was used for a week, and Taboo has never had another seizure.

I wish you the best. Watching a cat go into a seizure (or any animal or person for that matter) is very difficult. I hope this is easily remedied, for your sake and the kitty's...

Thoughts and best wishes,
TMF Psyche

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Author: lazyglen One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 709 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 9:58 AM
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Cmonkey,

With your crew, my guess is that you have a regular Vet with whom you have a relationship. Give them a call and ask if they feel Phoebe needs to be looked at. You may even be able to talk directly to the Vet if you ask and can wait or let them call you back.

If it happens again, be sure to watch carefully to what happens, my guess is that the Vet will want to know specifics about the seizure.

Lastly, I have read that (at least with humans) that when they are having the siezure, they can still see and hear, so be sure to give love while it is happening.

LazyGlen
Sending good pet karma your way.

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Author: Raggmopp Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 710 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 3:35 PM
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so be sure to give love while it is happening.

LazyGlen


Uh, Glen. I'd think twice before trying to give love to anything (animal, vegitable or mineral) while it is having a siezure.


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Author: lazyglen One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 711 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 6:05 PM
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Raggmopp,

Perhaps I should have made myself more clear, it depends on how violent a seizure it is. I was once waiting for a table at a restaraunt when a guy had a seizure. One of the other patrons and I helped his wife lower him to the floor and kept him from hitting his head on anything hard. It looked like all the muscles in his body had tensed up and were vibrating slightly. We just held his hands, talked to him and waited it out.

cmonkey saidAs they go, it wasn't that severe; I could hear her little feet skittering around on the floor, and then she mostly stood and craned her neck. There was a bit of drooling, but it wasn't much. I patted her and talked to her and we waited it out.

If however, arms, legs, head (and tails) are flying in random directions, the best thing to do is probably to try to make a large an area as possible for them to flail.

Perhaps there are other folk here who know more about seizures who can chime in.

LazyGlen.

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Author: cmonkey Big gold star, 5000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 712 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 6:24 PM
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<<f however, arms, legs, head (and tails) are flying in random directions, the best
thing to do is probably to try to make a large an area as possible for them to flail.>>

Well, she ain't got no tail (Schipperke). We're going in on the 24th; it was the soonest I could get in at the vet school, which is where we went when she was having horrible some form auto-immune arthritis. They were great and she did really well. That was about 6 years or so ago, but they remember her. Who wouldn't, she's a peach.

So I'll let you all know what I find out. I do know that there are certain types of seizures that are more common during certain periods in life (puppies tend to have one kind more often than 6 year olds, etc.)


cmonkey

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Author: Raggmopp Big funky green star, 20000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 713 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 8:03 PM
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Perhaps there are other folk here who know more about seizures

In today's episode we found out why Raggmopp is not a paramedic...

Raggmoppp

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Author: ToddlerMom Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 714 of 121703
Subject: Re: Seizures Date: 5/13/1999 8:27 PM
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Raggmopp,

You were correct in recommending caution when an animal is having a seizure. Even the most loving animal could do severe damage if she/he bit the human without intending to do so.

I speak with experience as this is what my wonderful, loving cat did to me during a seizure. It hurt! And she really did not mean to do it. It was a reflex during the seizure - humans are known to bite their own tongues during Grand Mal seizures.

GA

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