No. of Recommendations: 18
Since it is pretty darned clear that no financial adviser is going to suggest this, and I felt it was time to remove the discussion from that thread.

At first onset, we'll develop as terrible sleeping disorder and need strong sleeping pills, prescribed by as many doctors as we can see in a short period of time. It shouldn't take very long to have a large enough supply and take tham all at once. Less messy than driving into a bridge abutment at 100 MPH.

It doesn't have to be that complicated, unless of course you are looking for an insurance payout. We are eliminating life insurance.

Helping the terminally ill end their lives, condemned for decades as immoral, is gaining traction. Banned everywhere but Oregon until 2008, it is now legal in five states. Its advocates, who have learned to shun the term "assisted suicide," believe that as baby boomers watch frail parents suffer, support for what they call the "aid in dying" movement will grow further.

In January, the New Mexico Supreme Court authorized doctors to provide lethal prescriptions and declared a constitutional right for "a competent, terminally ill patient to choose aid in dying." In May, the Vermont Legislature passed a law permitting it, joining Montana, Oregon and Washington. This spring, advocates are strongly promoting "death with dignity" bills in Connecticut and other states.


http://www.telegram.com/article/20140208/NEWS/302089876/1116...

And it's legal in several countries overseas. No need to worry about a botched job making things worse.

I helped my parents hospice at home with my sisters, both of which thankfully are nurses, one actually a hospice nurse. So I had it relatively "easy," being basically support staff and providing emotional support as my parents lives tortuously ebbed. There was nothing comforting or pleasant about the experiences, and I frankly wonder if our presence made things worse by keeping them from passing on, causing them to fight harder. I so wanted to take that vial of morphine that Sis guarded and end their pain. I guess you could say they looked peaceful at death, but only in comparison to the actively tortured state they had just left. I came home and threw out the "Scream" Halloween masks the kids had from their trick or treating days. Reminded me way too much of Dad's face in his final days.

And don't even get me started on Alzheimers. Went through that experience with someone I considered a second Mom. That is no life. I could fill pages and pages with horror stories, but hopefully you get my point.

But I did have the blessing of seeing a friend of the family chose his own exit. Saddled with Lou Gehrig's, he chose to stop taking meds, food or water, and passed away in a hospice where they administered palliative care. He empowered himself rather than allow himself and his wife to become a victim of his illness. It was very clear that he was truly at peace with his decision, and though it had been a struggle to get his wife on board with his ideas, she eventually also became accepting of his choosing his exit.

We are kinder to our pets than we are to ourselves, not allowing them to suffer unnecessarily. Our medical ability to keep life hanging on by the barest thread has long surpassed our ability to calmly discuss this subject of personal choice. I am hopeful that when my time comes to make that choice, society will have come to terms with it, but if not, I will be proactive. Though I am now in good health, I have already started discussing my choice with DH, who will be my biggest impediment. And my last act of love will be to protect my family from repeating my experience, leave them remembering me as vibrant, not an unrecognizable shell of my former self.

IP,
way more afraid of "living" too long than dying
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The Swiss are now allowing assisted suicide for the elderly even if they are not sick.

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/may/26/swiss-exit-as...

A Swiss organisation that helps people take their own lives has voted to extend its services to elderly people who are not terminally ill.

Exit added "suicide due to old age" to their statutes at an annual general meeting held over the weekend, allowing people suffering from psychological or physical problems associated with old age the choice to end their life.

Assisted dying is legal in Switzerland and technically even a healthy young person could use such services. However, organisations involved in this work set their own internal requirements, which differ from group to group.

</snip>


I believe Oregon and Washington State require a doctor's note saying you're terminal and have less than 6 months to live, and are not depressed.

intercst
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"I believe Oregon and Washington State require a doctor's note saying you're terminal and have less than 6 months to live, and are not depressed."

Because it is important to force severely depressed people to gut it out to the bitter end?
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jgc123 asks,

"I believe Oregon and Washington State require a doctor's note saying you're terminal and have less than 6 months to live, and are not depressed."

Because it is important to force severely depressed people to gut it out to the bitter end?

</snip>


No. They want to make sure that if you have depression that's treatable, that you aren't mistakenly killing yourself in error.

intercst
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Netherlands has had a program that allows early death for those with terminal illness for decades. It is one way they control medical costs of the terminally ill.

We know that expenditures in the final months of life of the terminally ill are often very high due to all the added services they receive in hospitals.
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And my last act of love will be to protect my family from repeating my experience, leave them remembering me as vibrant, not an unrecognizable shell of my former self.

My father died from brain cancer. He told me there are worse things than dying. I took that bit of advice to heart.

My FIL, who had terminal cancer, was euthanized as per his wishes with the assistance of his hospice nurse and his doctor, who changed his pain medication prescription from a specific dose, to "to comfort." The nurse complied, and he passed in his sleep a few hours later.
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This is a big slippery slope.

Biggest point to make, there is a difference between comfort care/hospice care (which some can call passive assisted suicide) and active assisted suicide.

The former, the patient and family have forgone actively treating a disease and all heroic life saving measures. Nutrition and hydration may or may not be continued. Pain medications can be given in various amounts, even to the point of causing respiratory depression/cessation ultimately leading to death. This I have no problems with occurring.

Active assisted suicide, purposefully giving medication with the specific intent to end the life right then and there, is where I start to fear the slippery slope and get that queasy feeling. Sure it seems like a no brainer in a patient that has cancer, multiple mets, less than 6 weeks much less 6 months to live. Then you get characters like Jack Kevorkian stepping in with questionable morals/ethics and sign a few papers, video a confession/request, and you start "assisting" people that have 2, 3, or 5 years left who just happen to be very afraid of being incapacitated/burdened. Then you start raising the question of babies born with severe malformations, why waste time, money, and effort to grow a vegetable? The possibilities become exponential to where you can end up like "Logan's Run", happy 30th birthday, it will be your last.

While some countries might appear to have rules/guidelines/safe guards for active assisted suicide, there have been enough stories/studies/reports to show that the system can easily be abused.

JLC
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This is a big slippery slope.

Controversial? You bet. But worse would be ignoring peoples' right to chose their own final departure. Worse would be continuing to torture people with questionable value medical treatments against their will.

As to Kevorkian type premature terminations, if I knew that I could legally define a state at which my life would be terminated and was not overrideable by my spouse or SO, it would preclude the need for me to end things while I was still capable of self-termination, which would be sooner than absolutely necessary. So this type of legal protection could very well extend life.

We as a people are impressive when it comes to developing technology, much of which is very beneficial in extending life. Where we need to catch up is in the philosophical area, tackling the hard question of when is it no longer kind to apply this wonderful technology.

It is rather ironic that in a culture where women have been granted control over their bodies to the extent that they are allowed to terminate another life, we as competent adults are not extended the same right to terminate our own. Women are not forced to perform their own abortions, why should people be forced to end their own lives?

IP,
DEFINITELY NOT looking to get into a discussion on "morals" here, since the law has little to do with that
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JLC writes,

This is a big slippery slope.

</snip>


The State of Oregon has allowed assisted suicide since 1998. In the past 15 years less than 1000 people have met the criteria and taken the option. If that's a 'slippery slope', there aren't many people on the slide.

https://public.health.oregon.gov/ProviderPartnerResources/Ev...

intercst
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