Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
No. of Recommendations: 17
A good laugh for people in the over 50 group !!!
When I bought my Blackberry, I thought about the 30-year business I ran with 1800 employees, all without a cell phone that plays music, takes videos, pictures and communicates with Facebook and Twitter. I signed up under duress for Twitter and Facebook, so my seven kids, their spouses, 13 grand kids and 2 great grand kids could communicate with me in the modern way. I figured I could handle something as simple as Twitter with only 140 characters of space.

That was before one of my grandkids hooked me up for Tweeter, Tweetree, Twhirl, Twitterfon, Tweetie and Twittererific Tweetdeck, Twitpix and something that sends every message to my cell phone and every other program within the texting World.

My phone was beeping every three minutes with the details of everything except the bowel movements of the entire next generation. I am not ready to live like this. I keep my cell phone in the garage in my golf bag.

The kids bought me a GPS for my last birthday because they say I get lost every now and then going over to the grocery store or library. I keep that in a box under my tool bench with the Blue tooth [it's red] phone I am supposed to use when I drive. I wore it once and was standing in line at Barnes and Noble talking to my wife and everyone in the nearest 50 yards was glaring at me. I had to take my hearing aid out to use it, and I got a little loud.

I mean the GPS looked pretty smart on my dash board, but the lady inside that gadget was the most annoying, rudest person I had run into in a long time. Every 10 minutes, she would sarcastically say, "Re-calc-u-lating." You would think that she could be nicer. It was like she could barely tolerate me. She would let go with a deep sigh and then tell me to make a U-turn at the next light. Then if I made a right turn instead. Well, it was not a good relationship..
When I get really lost now, I call my wife and tell her the name of the cross streets and while she is starting to develop the same tone as Gypsy, the GPS lady, at least she loves me.

To be perfectly frank, I am still trying to learn how to use the cordless phones in our house. We have had them for 4 years, but I still haven't figured out how I can lose three phones all at once and have to run around digging under chair cushions and checking bathrooms and the dirty laundry baskets when the phone rings.

The world is just getting too complex for me. They even mess me up every time I go to the grocery store. You would think they could settle on something themselves but this sudden "Paper or Plastic?" every time I check out just knocks me for a loop. I bought some of those cloth reusable bags to avoid looking confused, but I never remember to take them with me.

Now I toss it back to them. When they ask me, "Paper or Plastic?" I just say, "Doesn't matter to me. I am bi-sacksual." Then it's their turn to stare at me with a blank look. I was recently asked if I tweet. I answered, No, but I do fart a lot."

P.S. I know some of you are not over 50. I sent it to you to allow you to forward it to those who are.
We senior citizens don't need anymore gadgets. The TV remote and the garage door remote are about all we can handle.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Two cans and some string...



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Speak for yourself. I'm 76; wife is 73. I think that qualifies us as seniors. We have 3 computers, 4 HD-DVRs, and I want an iPhone. And then there's the 100" HT with 10 speakers. I love the gadgets!

db
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Speak for yourself. I'm 76; wife is 73. I think that qualifies us as seniors. We have 3 computers, 4 HD-DVRs, and I want an iPhone. And then there's the 100" HT with 10 speakers. I love the gadgets!

db


Nice system. Projection TV, center speaker, two left and two right fronts (or single fronts and two front presence), left and right dipole/bipole surrounds, two rears (or two presence), and a sub. Amp is probably a 7.2 and has the advanced Dolby and DTS sound codecs.

Mine has additional five speakers (extra sub, extra two fronts (A&B) and two rear presence). Amp is a 11.2. Screen is a 60-in. plasma.

I am 74. Know something, db? Those kids at Best Buy don’t know diddly squat.

MichaelR
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Michael,

An Oppo BDP-95 with SOTA DACs connected via analog XLR stereo and RCA 7.1 to a Cary Cinema 11a processor in bypass mode is the main audio source. A DirecTV HD-DVR is connected via HDMI. The system has two Velodyne HGS-15 subs controlled by an SMS-1 bass manager. A 3-channel and two 2-channel Proceed amps feed KEF Reference speakers via XLR lines. The LR mains are a pair of 107/2s.

Most of the equipment was bought used from sellers on Audiogon at a fraction of MSRP. We use the system for both music and HT. It does both well.

db
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Michael,

An Oppo BDP-95 with SOTA DACs connected via analog XLR stereo and RCA 7.1 to a Cary Cinema 11a processor in bypass mode is the main audio source. A DirecTV HD-DVR is connected via HDMI. The system has two Velodyne HGS-15 subs controlled by an SMS-1 bass manager. A 3-channel and two 2-channel Proceed amps feed KEF Reference speakers via XLR lines. The LR mains are a pair of 107/2s.

Most of the equipment was bought used from sellers on Audiogon at a fraction of MSRP. We use the system for both music and HT. It does both well.

db


Niiiiiice. And you’ve proven you don’t have to sell one of the grandkids to build it.

We’re of the same approach: good picture, sure, but equally as good sound. Having ten-fifteen speakers may be, to some, over the top yet with that many the sound envelops and is clear without excessive volume.

My hearing is as good as it ever was but for a slight diminishment at 21KHz but I am still in the range of the system (15Hz to 20KHz). My speakers are Velodyne, Infinity Reference, Mirage 360s, and PSB. For me it means I can balance all to where the ‘wall of sound’ blends across the sound spectrum.

One last. The electrical supply to our house is poor: so much junk added to the supply and it showed both in video and sound. I put in a Monster Constant Voltage leveler unit and a Monster Line smoother and the system became clearer and cleaner. Colors popped out and the Yamaha Z-11 seemed to process sound that much better.

MichaelR
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
I am up in the mountains of NC, catching up on my e-mail and TMF. I read your post, laughing the entire time, and then read it to my friend. You would think the second time around, I could control the laughter, but, alas, I could not. You truly made my day.

Donna (still laughing)
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 1
Agreed, Donna, it was funny and I did chuckle yet it perpetuates a stereotypical dodderingness that I find on reflection awry with fact. I would put dollars on those of us geezers in their three-score and ten years still doing ‘stuff’ as well as if we were much younger.

It wasn’t that dbphd and I hijacked the threat talking about home theater but that – both of us in our mid seventies – can and have built high-end systems parallel to few. And it isn’t that db ‘just’ built his system but that he’s knowledgeable about each component in it and how each interacts with its fellows. We’re talking micrometer adjustments here so the system is at its peak. That takes smarts.

Point is we in the latter part of our lives really don’t fit the stereotype of losing everything portable and who are mystified by the modern electronics and their use. Sure, those without any prior interest may find some difficulty but, in the main, we’ve seen the concept before and learning how to handle the modern iteration can be learned.

Doddering we ain’t.

MichaelR
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 5
re: Facebook for Seniors

My 86 y.o. MIL uses Facebook and keeps up with family and with friends she and her late husband met during their many motorhome caravan trips across the country. She was also a nurse cadet during WWII and she participates in some long-term Harvard nurses study, so she has a pretty good network.

She started using a computer in about 1997 after broadly hinting that she wouldn't mind receiving any computer we might be getting rid of. Teaching her was hilarious and frustrating as h3ll. The mouse nearly did us all in, but she's a pro now.

ChiliSpouse has some program he uses to log into her computer remotely when she screws something up. He's told her repeatedly to never, ever do anything, not one single thing, the 80 or 90 y.o. self-style computer gurus tell her to do, but sometimes they talk her into it and CS has to do a remote repair.

She now also has a 10-inch Samsung Galaxy S2 wireless tablet that she loves, Garmin GPS for the car and really, really wants a smartphone to replace her dumb cellphone, but we've drawn the line there. The keys are too small and we agree she doesn't need to surf the net on a phone when she has a PC and a tablet. The Garmin is easier to read than Google Maps on a cellphone, too.

She may still get the smartphone. Who knows? The woman still teaches line dancing and a daily exercise class.

When Michael J. Fox was asked if he tweeted, he said, "No, but I twitch."

Chili
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
pauleckler:

What a fabulous post!!! I laughed out loud at parts of it.

Like you, I managed a group of people years ago, if not as many as you, and we did fine without the phone/laptop gadgets.

We have an ancient Tracfone we try to keep charged by simply not using it, or even leaving it on, except when we need to call one of the kids, or when we expect them to call us. It's just for emergencies. (Even that came with a big book describing all its features, but I just keep the names and numbers on there we MAY choose to call. No texting or whatever.)

My wife and I think one of the reasons so many couples seem to have trouble with each other and with their other relationships these days is that they're all tied up with "gadgets" and are forgetting how to communicate without those.

And the kids? I worry about where they may be headed...

Good post.

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
MichaelR :

To clarify...

I've been an Extra Class FCC licensed radio amateur for over 50 years. I've built a lot of my stuff, have designed many antennas and put them up myself, have managed to contact virtually all of the countries in the world (and actually know where they are, too), and have been active in various contests and competitions, doing rather well in them.

In other words, I don't consider myself "doddering", but I do not choose to get all ensnarled in what I call the "crap" of Twittering, Texting, Ipods, Ibooks or whatever. (Yes, I finally got a Facebook account, but severely limited it to maybe half a dozen family members only.) I do enjoy emailing a few friends, and sometimes also enjoy these bulletin boards. Oh, and I do enjoy reading books.

My wife and I are old fashioned. She doesn't even want to bother with a computer. We call people on the phone if we want to talk to them, we enjoy seeing people in person at church or elsewhere, and use road maps if necessary. We dearly love the peace and quiet resulting from NOT having a bunch of beeping, annoying gadgets around us.

To each his or her own, I guess!

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<I've been an Extra Class FCC licensed radio amateur for over 50 years. I've built a lot of my stuff, have designed many antennas and put them up myself, have managed to contact virtually all of the countries in the world (and actually know where they are, too), and have been active in various contests and competitions, doing rather well in them. >>



I got my license circa 1970 myself. I've kept the license but I haven't had a station up in many years.


What varieties of equipment do you like?

Personally I recall the Heath Kits, Knight Kits, Viking Rangers and other tube equipment of the 1960s most fondly.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
SP:

I first started with an old Heathkit AT-1 transmitter kit in the 50's, an old surplus ARC-5 3-6 MHz receiver, and a "coupler" made by winding enamel covered wire on a cardboard tube from a roll of toilet paper, with clip leads and an old variable cap from a broadcast receiver. Pretty crude, but I had fun! In those days, too, of course, there were no VFO's so each transmitter crystal gave you ONE frequency to send on! I had three 80-meter Novice band crystals -- a big deal!

Over the years, I went to a Heath DX-100 transmitter, Hallicrafters receiver, etc. Now I just use an Icom IC-746 transceiver and an all-band wire antenna in the trees -- ample to contact people anywhere I choose from up on this ridge. (I have a KW amp, but never use it.)

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
Thanks for the thought Vermonter. But I didn't write that. It came in an email that I shared. I suppose I should have noted that.
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
My wife and I are old fashioned. She doesn't even want to bother with a computer. We call people on the phone if we want to talk to them; we enjoy seeing people in person at church or elsewhere, and use road maps if necessary. We dearly love the peace and quiet resulting from NOT having a bunch of beeping, annoying gadgets around us.

To each his or her own, I guess!

Vermonter


My point, of which you are a damn good example, is though we’re the older generation we aren’t bemused by technology. Sure, we pick and choose what technologies we adopt yet we do, in certain areas of our interests, keep abreast of what’s current and leading. Age hasn’t slowed that.

I’ll bet a dollar when you’re on shortwave you’re chatting about this and that but also about equipment and what works best and what doesn’t. You are up-to-date on shortwave ‘stuff’. And I’ll bet another dollar that no one knows your true age unless you tell them.

Mine is audio/visual. For 50 years I’ve built just about all the components making up a good system. Now I have a superb setup because I not only continue having the interest but because I know what works and what doesn’t. I answer questions on TMF’s Help With This Home Theater board and no one there bases what I write on the fact I am an old fart.

MichaelR
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<<I first started with an old Heathkit AT-1 transmitter kit in the 50's, an old surplus ARC-5 3-6 MHz receiver, and a "coupler" made by winding enamel covered wire on a cardboard tube from a roll of toilet paper, with clip leads and an old variable cap from a broadcast receiver. Pretty crude, but I had fun! In those days, too, of course, there were no VFO's so each transmitter crystal gave you ONE frequency to send on! I had three 80-meter Novice band crystals -- a big deal!>>


I built my first transmitter mostly from parts from a TV chassis I bought from a thrift store. I was on 40 meters and I had two or three crytals as I recall. That was about 1970.


My ideal at the time was the Viking Ranger transmitter. Still is, really! I thought that was about everything you could want in a low power HF transmitter.


Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
MichaelR:

True about no one "out there" knowing your age. I started as a young teenager (14) and soon became a highly skilled Morse code (c.w.) operator, gaining respect among associates I contacted. No one judged me by my age -- only by my skills on the air.

The same holds true today; however, after all these years, I've become a lot better known in amateur circles, so most experienced hams around the world know who I am. Being in a "rare" state doesn't hurt, either!

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
SP:

The newer radios do everything but sit up and bark! You might check them out.

Even though many hams go for big towers and costly antennas, though,I still have a modest wire antenna in the trees and work most anything I want to. I've confirmed contact with every country in the world except two. Takes a bit more skill and patience at times, but it's still fun!

I confess to not being as active as I used to be. I think most of us find that our interests vary and spike up or down.

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
<< SP:

The newer radios do everything but sit up and bark! You might check them out.>>



Heh, heh! So radio transmitters that chirp are bad but they are good if they bark??


So what kind of features do you like and use?



Seattle Pioneer
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
SP:

Well, my now aging Icom IC-746 (one of the cheaper ones in their line) has all the features I need. Full break-in on c.w.; three instantly resettable frequencies on each band (160 through 2 meters), handy for when you might want to set the tcvr on a pileup but want to go away briefly and come back; nice, sharp optional filters; auto-tuner built-in (once set on a band, you change bands and just send in seconds); AM/FM/SSB/FSK/c.w.; and more if you need it. And many other features.

This is my second unit, by the way. The first one was literally "smoked" by a lightning hit on the antenna years ago, despite being disconnected! The hit VAPORIZED the copper wires in my 450-ohm ladder line, too. I brought some pieces of the "window line" stuff to a club meeting to show how the copper wires were totally gone!

I also have a programmable electronic keyer that I love, as a c.w. op. Runs almost indefinitely on 4 AA batteries. It has three banks of 6 messages each. You program each message by setting it and sending into it. For contests, you can even set it to automatically upnumber the serial number each time, too.

Enough?

Vermonter
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 2
Print the post Back To Top
No. of Recommendations: 0
What?? Poor Todd Akin did not get to put in a vote for "real" rape?
Print the post Back To Top
Advertisement