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Author: rjstanford Big red star, 1000 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 757652  
Subject: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 3:50 PM
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Since its been discussed frequently here, I thought that this group might enjoy the following:

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For all you married folks out there. A Lasting Marriage is worth £60,000 a Year Concludes New Analysis of Happiness

Found at University of Warwick - http://www.csv.warwick.ac.uk/news/pr/business/164

Business & Economics

A Lasting Marriage is worth £60,000 a Year Concludes New Analysis of Happiness

A lasting marriage brings as much happiness as having an additional 60,000 of pounds income, according to a new research report on levels of happiness entitled "Well Being in Britain and the US".

The study, by economists Professor Andrew Oswald at the University of Warwick, and David Blanchflower at Dartmouth College USA, found that despite a decline over the last quarter century in the number of married people, those who are married report much higher happiness levels than the unmarried. The authors examined the lives of 100,000 randomly sampled people in Great Britain and the US.

In the early 70s, 72% of the report's sample of the US and British population were married. This figure drops to 55% by the late 1990s. However, the report discovered that those in the sample who are separated, widowed or divorced consistently showed worse levels of unhappiness than comes from losing your job.

The report also looked at levels of wealth, and unsurprisingly, found that the more money one has the happier one is. When the amount of happiness generated by a lasting marriage was compared to the amount of happiness produced by a change in one's financial circumstances, the authors' statistical calculations showed that a lasting marriage brings as much added happiness as 60,000 pounds sterling (100,000 Dollars) extra in one's annual income. Some other conclusions of the report include:

* Happiness is greatest among; women, the highly educated, and, of course, married people

* Money does buy happiness - but less than is generally thought

* The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point

Professor Oswald's web page can be found at http://www.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/Economics/oswald/

A full copy of this research paper in PDF format can be found at http://www.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/Economics/oswald/Wellbeingnew.pdf
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Author: cmorford Three stars, 500 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6808 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 3:57 PM
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* The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point

Dang, no wonder I'm so dissatisfied...I'm at the bottom of the Happiness Curve and I'm un-married....

Bummer...

Chuck


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Author: Daryll40 Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6810 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 4:06 PM
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* The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point

Dang, no wonder I'm so dissatisfied...I'm at the bottom of the Happiness Curve and I'm un-married....

Bummer...

Chuck


Double Dang...I'll be 40 in a few weeks.

Daryll40 (really still Daryll39)


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Author: Madness Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6814 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 4:24 PM
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* The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point


Oh, excellent! I just turned 40, and am very happy. I can't wait to see where things go from here!

--madness

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Author: izandal One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6828 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 6:28 PM
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* The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point

Is that why they say "Life begins at 40"?

40, married, and fairly happy.

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Author: NowInMaui One star, 50 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6831 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 7:32 PM
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The report conclusions were:

Happiness is greatest among; women, the highly educated, and, of course, married people;
Money does buy happiness - but less than is generally thought; The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point


Having read the report, I would argue that, like the statistical differentiation of personality types among ER's and potential ER's relational to the general population, there would be a signifigant statistical difference if just ER's were measured for happiness.

For example, I would argue that instead of a U shaped happiness graph, an ER's curve would look more like a V shaped graph: The nadir, or bottom of the V, would represent the day before ER, and the zenith, or top of the V, the day after ER. Age would become an irrelevant factor in our curve. Some retire before 40, and I cannot accept that they are unhappy and retired before 40. And, since ER requires money to retire, and most of us are educated, we should all be off a measurable happiness chart. I know that since ER, I am.<grin> NowInMaui





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Author: scratchi Two stars, 250 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6832 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 7:42 PM
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I'm planning to stay 39.95 until retirement, myself!


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Author: DogLovingFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6839 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/23/2000 10:12 PM
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* The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at around age 40 and increasing after that point


Wow, I'm 40, nearly 41, and married. Have a great dog. Found the Fool at 40, DH is about to retire, things are looking up more and more everyday. I think they may be right! :-)

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Author: jpkiljan One star, 50 posts Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6879 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/25/2000 12:17 AM
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. . . The graph of happiness over one's life-time is U shaped - falling on average to its lowest point at
around age 40 and increasing after that point . . .


I looked through the links on the original post to try to find this and couldn't. I just wanted to give copies to my 40-year old friends and tell them to cheer up because things start getting better from now on. If anyone can tell me how they found it (or better yet, just copy the link), it'd be much appreciated.
TIA, -- John


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Author: vickifool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6891 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/25/2000 10:36 AM
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The study reported:
* Happiness is greatest among; women, the highly educated, and, of course, married people


I had read previously that studies showed that Married Men were happiest, followed by Single Women, then Married Women, and lastly Single Men. Obviously other researchers have reported on this ongoing study. (Typically leading to lurid headlines like: Marriage bad for women!) I found the additional conclusions very interesting.

The bottoming-out of happiness at 40 may be physical--rather like getting your adult teeth beginning at age 8. As I've gotten older and watched myself "turning into my mother," one of the things we both did around that age was develop high blood pressure and become harder to get along with. Men are stereotypically renowned for their "mid-life crisis" purchase of a sports car or aquisition of a younger wife. (I've been encouraging my husband to get a sports car, just in case.) And speaking of teeth, how many people do you know who needed a root canal right around 40?

Vickifool -- whose blood pressure is down and disposition is up, now.

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Author: 1HappyFool Big gold star, 5000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 6969 of 757652
Subject: Re: Sidenote on Happiness Date: 3/27/2000 8:31 AM
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Vickifool asked:
And speaking of teeth, how many people do you know who needed a root canal right around 40?

I needed three root canals just before turning 41. Two in one day and one more several weeks later. There were no forewarning symptoms. Just old fillings that had developed cracks. I used to say, "I would rather have a root canal than wait in line at the California DMV", but three was well over the CADMV pain threshold.

1HappyFool


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