Message Font: Serif | Sans-Serif
 
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (8) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Author: BobbysPapa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: of 2851  
Subject: Software? Date: 5/3/2012 4:50 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Can anyone recommend a good program for writing your own recipes? I tried doing a search on this board, but didn't see much.

Alternatively, if anyone would like to share a good pale ale recipe (all-grain, 5 gallon) I'd greatly appreciate it! Thanks so much....

Mike in NJ
Print the post Back To Top
Author: NechesInvst Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2656 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 5/3/2012 10:45 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
DEFALCO'S AMERICAN PALE ALE (APA)
Effervescent, light amber tint, floral hop bite. Very popular!
O.G. - 1.050 F.G. - 1.012
INGREDIENTS:
6 lbs. light malt extract
1 1/2 lb. pale malt
1/2 lb. cara-pils malt
1/2 lb. medium crystal malt
1 oz. Centennial or Perle hops (bittering)
1/2 oz. Cascades hops (flavoring)
1/2 oz. Cascades hops (finishing)
1 pkg. Burton water salts
Yeast: Dried - 1 pkg. Nottingham or Safale US-56 ale yeast
Liquid - Wyeast #1056, #1272 or White Labs California or California V Ale Yeast
1 pkg. Bru-Vigor (yeast food, if using tap water)
3/4 cup corn sugar (priming)

PROCEDURE:
Note: If you are using Wyeast liquid yeast, prepare the yeast 24 hours prior to brewing! Activate the yeast by “smacking” it to rupture the internal pouch, thereby mixing its contents with the other contents in the pouch. Allow the yeast to remain at room temperature to swell. Check the packaging date on the pouch. If it has been over two months since it was packaged, allow an extra day for the pouch to swell up. If you are using White Labs Pitchable Yeast, simply remove from refrigerator and allow to warm up to room temperature during the brew session.
1. In a small saucepan, bring a gallon of water to 160° - 170° and turn off the heat. Add the bag of grains and water salts (if used) and steep 30 minutes. Now, gently sparge (rinse) the grains with hot tap water (ideal temperature 168°) and bring the total volume up to two or more gallons in a stainless steel or enameled kettle (avoid aluminum). As a rule, boiling as much of the full five gallons as possible is best. Bring to boil and resume step #2.
2. Turn off heat and add malt extract. Return to boil, taking care not to allow wort to overflow onto your stovetop. Start timing now, continuing the boil for 5 minutes. Add the bittering hops (1 oz. Centennial or Perle) and boil 45 minutes. Now add the flavoring hops (1/2 oz. Cascades) and boil 10 minutes. For aroma, add the finishing hops (1/2 oz. Cascades) and immediately turn off heat.
3. To facilitate cooling, we suggest placing your brewing kettle in the sink with 5 or 6 inches of cold water (A tray or two of ice cubes in the cooling bath wouldn't hurt). Allow to stand for 20 - 30 minutes in the cooling bath.
4. If using dried yeast, rehydrate it while the wort is cooling. To do this, sprinkle the yeast into a cup of lukewarm (90° - 100°F) water and cover with saran wrap or tin foil. Let stand for 10 - 20 minutes. For best results, we recommend using Wyeast or White Labs liquid yeast.
5. Pour the cooled wort into the fermenter. Bring the total volume up to five gallons. Check and record the temperature and specific gravity at this time. Make the necessary gravity corrections for temperatures above 60° (Add .001 for every 7° above 60°F).
6. If the temperature is less than 80o, pour the yeast "slurry" and the packet of Bru-Vigor into the wort and place the lid and airlock over the fermenter. Although ideal fermentation temperatures are lower, it is very important to get the fermentation started as soon as possible to avoid contamination of the
beer. In any case, be aware that temperatures over 110o will most likely kill your beer yeast.
7. For best results, ferment at 62° - 75°F.
8. FERMENTATION: Double Stage - The beer will be ready to rack (syphon) when the rocky head subsides (2 - 4 days) and the gravity drops to approximately 1.016 or less. Syphon the beer into the sec- ondary fermenter. As soon as the foaming allows, top up the secondary with water to within 2 - 3 inches of the fermentation lock if your volume is short. Allow to ferment and settle until action has virtually ceased and the beer has clarified.
FERMENTATION: Single Stage - Allow wort to ferment for 7 days. Assuming your fermentation lock has stopped bubbling proceed to step #9, bottling preparations.
9. Check the specific gravity. This final gravity (F.G.) should read about 1.012 (or less). If it is more than 1.017, do not bottle until you call us!
10. Prepare the priming sugar by making a simple syrup on the stove. Pour the sugar into a small saucepan containing a cup of boiling water. Stir to dissolve. Pour this mixture into the finished beer as you are syphoning it into a sanitized priming container. Stir well, but avoid excess splashing. Immedi- ately syphon the beer into sanitized bottles, leaving about an inch of head space. Use a bottle filler for ease in filling.
11. Allow beer to age at room temperature for at least two weeks before chilling. Peak flavor should be reached about six weeks and lasts several months.
12. Chill and serve! Pour carefully so as not to disturb the small amount of sediment on the bottom of the bottles. Enjoy your homemade beer!

ALL-GRAIN RECIPE
10 lb. domestic two row pale malt
1/4 lb. cara-pils malt
1/2 lb. medium crystal malt
1 oz. Centennial or Perle hops (bittering)
1/2 oz. Cascades hops (flavoring)
1/2 oz. Cascades hops (finishing)
1 pkg. Burton water salts
Yeast: Dried -1 pkg. Nottingham or Safale US-56 ale yeast
Liquid - Wyeast #1056, #1272 or White Labs California or California V Ale Yeast
3/4 cup corn sugar (priming)

Mashing Procedure: Heat 3 1/2 gallons of water to 168o, mix in water salts and stir thoroughly, now dough your crushed grain in, making sure to stir constantly to avoid dry pockets of grain. Once grain is thoroughly mixed in, cover. Check temperature after approximately five minutes, it should be about 153°, plus or minus 4°. If it is noticeably colder or hotter, add boiling water or ice cubes and stir to mix in to adjust temperature. Stir mash every 10 - 15 minutes. After an hour of mashing, recirculate wort back through grain bed until it begin to flow relatively clear, not a lot of cloudiness. Now you may run this clear wort off into your kettle while you slowly sparge the grain with hot water at about 168o. Try to collect a total of at least 6 1/2 - 7 gallons. Bring to a boil for about 10 minutes, then begin adding hops as outlined above. Please note that when using all grain recipes, your original and final gravities may vary considerably from our predicted readings.

I've loved their recipes.

As for software: I can think of 3
http://www.beersmith.com/
http://www.promash.com/

And a freebie for your mobile device: http://brewology101.com/

Mike

Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Print the post Back To Top
Author: chestersakl Three stars, 500 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2657 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 5/4/2012 12:25 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f84/software-available-42935/

Here's a good list (but a little outdated on a few links) of the software out there.

Personally I use BrewSmith 2.0 and really like it. That'll run you $28, but you can download a trial version to test it out first.

I've also seen people recommend Brewtarget (http://brewtarget.sourceforge.net/) as an open source option, but I have no personal experience with it.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: RIKris Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2673 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 5/8/2012 3:32 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
I'd vote for beer smith too. It well worth the $20 or $30 they charge for it. I think you can try it for free too. Make sure you take the time to enter the details about the equipment you use. My favorite part is the print outs of the step by step instructions for brew day. I don't need to make any calculations it does it all for me.

Print the post Back To Top
Author: BobbysPapa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2674 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 5/21/2012 6:40 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Mike- Thanks so much! I now have this recipe fermenting away in the primary, and all went well. In a few weeks I will be able to report the results to you....


Mike in NJ

Print the post Back To Top
Author: BobbysPapa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2675 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 6/20/2012 10:06 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
Well, I am drinking this brew as we speak. It is pretty good, if a little tart for my taste, but I definitely like it! My specifics:

O.G.- 1.052
F.G.- 1.010

I used dry Nottingham yeast, rehydrated; didn't use the water salts at all, and I used turbinado sugar for the priming. There was hardly any sediment at all in the final product, and, although it has very little head, is a clear, light brown/tan color.

Very good, and thanks!!


Mike in NJ

Print the post Back To Top
Author: BobbysPapa Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2678 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 7/18/2012 4:56 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 1
Hey Mike! I just wanted to report back that the original tartness I noticed in this recipe seems to have mellowed after an additional week or two in the bottle. It is now very smooth and drinkable, and I am going to finish it up tonight (assuming I can stay awake long enough!)

Thanks again!


Mike in NJ

Print the post Back To Top
Author: NechesInvst Big red star, 1000 posts Old School Fool CAPS All Star Add to my Favorite Fools Ignore this person (you won't see their posts anymore) Number: 2679 of 2851
Subject: Re: Software? Date: 7/29/2012 2:43 PM
Post New | Post Reply | Reply Later | Create Poll Report this Post | Recommend it!
Recommendations: 0
My brew buddies brewed this a second time. It is a very drinkable beer. I'm the only holdout for brewing nothing but IPAs. The American Pale Ale is still a flavorful brew which lacks the hop bite of an IPA.

I'm glad you liked it. I could drink this all year.

Mike

Print the post Back To Top
UnThreaded | Threaded | Whole Thread (8) | Ignore Thread Prev Thread | Next Thread
Advertisement